GD
Geodynamics

Introducing the blog team!

Introducing the blog team!

It’s time for another proper introduction of the blog team! As you will probably know, things have been a bit silent on the blog front lately. This is because all the blog editors were very busy and also: it’s hard to upload 52 times a year. You come up with some great blog ideas! (if you do: e-mail us, please!). Luckily, we used the EGU General Assembly to find some fresh blood for the blog team. Together with the seasoned blog team members and a new blog strategy, we are buzzing to give you regular content once again. Expect the usual blog posts on Wednesday at 9:00 am and in the future, maybe expect a little extra on Fridays… But who are these great people providing you with your weekly dose of geodynamics news?

The Blog Team

Iris van Zelst
I am a PhD student in the Seismology and Wave Physics group at ETH Zürich, Switzerland. I am right at the seismology border of geodynamic research, as I am combining geodynamic modelling with dynamic rupture modelling to look at earthquakes in subduction zones on the entire timescale relevant to the process. I also occasionally look at some data, because you should always keep it real. I am in the final year of my PhD (oh help!), so my aim as Editor-in-Chief is to make sure everyone else is organised and uploading regularly, while I will be mostly pulling the strings behind the scenes and writing an occasional blog post. Such as this one! In my spare time, I love to read lots of books in all kinds of genres, go to the theatre, and play a little bit of theatre myself. I recently enrolled in an improv class and it is so much fun! All the world’s a stage. You can reach my via e-mail.

Luca Dal Zilio
I am a postdoctoral researcher in Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). My research is primarily aimed at understanding the relationship between crustal deformation and earthquakes in mountain belts, such as the Alps and Himalaya. By combining theoretical, computational, and observational approaches, I attempt to understand the interplay between geodynamic space–time scales of millions of years of slow and broadly distributed regional deformation with seismic space–time scales of rapid and localised earthquake processes. My passion lies in democratising science communication via innovative and accessible tools in order to spread scientific research and discovery. And yes, I like coffee. Espresso. You can reach me via e-mail.

Anne Glerum
I am a postdoctoral researcher at GFZ Potsdam, Germany. With numerical models, I investigate the link between local stress and strain observations and far-field forcing in the East African Rift System. Other modelling interests include magma-tectonic feedback and surface evolution during continental extension. Outside of research, I love to go on walks with my dog, to explore my new home Berlin and to read books on all possible topics. I’m excited to show you the variety of geodynamics and its overlap with other disciplines as an editor of the GD blog team. You can reach me via e-mail.

Anna Gülcher
I am a PhD student at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics group at ETH Zürich, Switzerland. With the use of numerical modelling, I study the interior dynamics of the Earth and other planets. For my research, I am trying the put geophysical, geological, and geochemical observations in a geodynamically coherent framework (with an emphasis on trying). I found a passion for windsurfing early on while still living in my flat home country (the Netherlands). Yet, since moving to mountainous Switzerland, I have traded in my windsurfing equipment for hiking boots or snowboarding gear and try to spend my free time in the Alps to seek some adrenaline. I’ve very recently started to learn how to play the guitar, and am very proud to say that I can now play my very first complete song. I am excited to be part of the GD team as an Editor! You can reach me via e-mail.

Diogo Lourenço
I am a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California Davis, USA. My research aims at understanding the evolution and interior dynamics of the Earth and other rocky planets, primarily through the use of numerical models. When I am not working on theoretical geodynamics, I like to keep things theoretical. I like reading and playing music. Sometimes I also exercise by walking around museums and looking at things. With my work as an editor in this blog, I hope to bring geodynamics to the reader in a friendly and exciting way. I also hope to help building a more involved and integrative geodynamics community. You can reach me via e-mail.

Tobias Meier
I am currently a PhD student at the Center for Space and Habitability (CSH) at the University of Bern. My research focuses on understanding the interior dynamics of rocky exoplanets, particularly planets that are partly molten. At the CSH, Earth and planetary scientists and astrophysicists work side-by-side to understand the formation and evolution of solar system bodies and exoplanets. As an editor of the GD blog I will nurture the link between geodynamics and terrestrial planet evolution and foster interactions between related disciplines.
As an undergraduate I worked in the field of cosmology, so it was necessary for me to downsize from thinking about the vast scales of the universe to zooming in on individual planets when I transitioned to my PhD work. At the time of writing, there has not been a confirmation of an inhabited exoplanet where we could possibly travel to. So, on our own wonderful planet, I enjoy hiking in the beautiful Swiss mountains and I also (almost) never say no to a game of table tennis. You can reach me (also for table tennis!) via e-mail.

Antoine Rozel
I am a senior researcher in ETH Zürich. After studying physics (nobody is perfect), I have been working on numerical simulations of mantle convection involving absurd rheologies for quite a while now, I am getting old. I am also interested in crust and craton production in all solar system planets. To make life even more beautiful, I have also finished the conservatory in classical piano and I organised some painting exhibitions in the last years (you can find my gallery here). I have also found recently that -when I do not play pinball or videogames- I can save time by doing both music and sport at the same time by playing Japanese drums (taiko)! You can reach me via e-mail.

Grace Shephard
I am a Researcher at the Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics (CEED) at the University of Oslo, Norway. My research links plate tectonics,​ palaeogeography, and deep mantle structure and dynamics. I spend much of my time hunting for evidence to constrain the opening and closure of ocean basins, particularly around the Arctic, Atlantic and the Pacific. I think GPlates is an excellent Tardis with which to time travel. Geodynamics offers a lot of interdisciplinary and creative avenues to explore – and why not follow up your idea with a blog post! You can reach me via e-mail or find a sporadic tweet at @ShepGracie.

The Sassy Scientist
I am currently employed at a first tier research institute where I am continuously working with the greatest minds to further our understanding of the solid Earth system. Whether it is mantle or lithosphere structure and dynamics, solid Earth rheology parameters, earthquake processes, integrating observations with model predictions or inversions: you have read a paper of mine. Even if you are working on a topic I haven’t mentioned here, I still know everything about it. Do you have any problems in your research career? I have already experienced them. Do you struggle with your work-life balance? Been there, done that. Nowadays, I have only one hobby: helping you out by answering the most poignant questions in geodynamics, research, and life. I am waiting for you right here. Get inspired.

Iris van Zelst
Iris van Zelst is a PhD student at ETH Zürich in Switzerland. She is working on the modelling of tsunamigenic earthquakes using a range of interdisciplinary modelling approaches, such as geodynamic, dynamic rupture, and tsunami modelling. Current research projects include splay fault propagation in subduction zones and the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. Iris is Editor-in-chief of the GD blog team. You can reach Iris via email. For more details, please visit Iris' personal webpage.

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