EGU Blogs

Highlights

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Meeting Plate Tectonics – Barbara Romanowicz

Meeting Plate Tectonics – Barbara Romanowicz

These blogposts present interviews with outstanding scientists that bloomed and shape the theory that revolutionised Earth Sciences — Plate Tectonics. Get to know them, learn from their experience, discover the pieces of advice they share and find out where the newest challenges lie! Meeting Barbara Romanowicz Barbara Romanowicz studied mathematics and applied physics and did two PhDs, one in astr ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sunset and moonrise at Yosemite

Imaggeo on Mondays: Sunset and moonrise at Yosemite

This side view of Half Dome at Yosemite National Park (California, USA) was taken from Washburn Point, a less frequented overlook a few hundred meters away from the popular Glacier Point outlook. The sun just on the right side behind the camera, which gave the orange tint to the back side of Half Dome. At the same time a full moon was mere minutes from bursting in the background, which resulted in ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

An interview with Jenny Turton, early-career representative for the cryo-division of the EGU

An interview with Jenny Turton, early-career representative for the cryo-division of the EGU

The European Geophysical Union (EGU) has a number of scientific divisions or themes, such as cryosphere, atmospheric sciences and geodesy. Each division has a representative for early career scientists, and often a team of scientists who write and edit blogs and organise events. Today,  Jenny Turton, the new representative for the cryo-division, explains a bit more about the role and what she hope ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoTalk: Connecting art and science with the 2019 EGU artists in residence

GeoTalk: Connecting art and science with the 2019 EGU artists in residence

At the annual EGU General Assembly in April, more than 16,000 scientists from 113 countries convened in Vienna to share exciting research and discuss the latest advances in their field. During this conference, the EGU hosted two artists in residence to engage with scientific research in a dynamic setting and be inspired by new scientific discoveries. This year, we interviewed the 2019 artists in r ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

The Sassy Scientist – Time Trials

The Sassy Scientist – Time Trials

Every week, The Sassy Scientist answers a question on geodynamics, related topics, academic life, the universe or anything in between with a healthy dose of sarcasm. Do you have a question for The Sassy Scientist? Submit your question here. Sylvie asks: What would you say is the main problem you encountered during your research career? Dear Sylvie, Easy: time management and focus. Doing scientific ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

Production and recycling of Archean continental crust

Production and recycling of Archean continental crust

Continents are essential for the development and survival of life on Earth. However, as surprising as it may sound, there did not exist a planetary scale numerical model to show the formation of the oldest continents until the recent study ‘Growing primordial continental crust self-consistently in global mantle convection models‘ in Gondwana Research by Jain et al., 2019. Hot off the p ...[Read More]

HS
Hydrological Sciences

Featured catchment series: The North will rise again!

Featured catchment series: The North will rise again!

This is the first post of “Featured Catchment”, a series of posts in the HS Blog that present experimental catchments across Europe and beyond. Here, the authors of the posts will explain the main characteristics (e.g., climate, geology, topography, land use) of their catchments, why hydrologic research is important in their study areas, describe the applied methodologies (field instrumentation an ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Weathering the storm from a research vessel

Weathering the storm from a research vessel

Fieldwork can take geoscientists to some of the most remote corners of the Earth in some of the harshest conditions imaginable, but stories from the field hardly make it into a published paper. In this blog post, Raffaele Bonadio, a PhD student in seismology at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies in Ireland, shares a particularly formidable experience in the field while aboard a research ves ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Foggy Bandon beach, Oregon

Imaggeo on Mondays: Foggy Bandon beach, Oregon

This picture was taken at Bandon beach, Oregon. Bandon is well-known for its memorable seascape of stacks of all shapes and sizes. These rock formations are known to geologists as ‘knockers’ and carry nicknames like ‘the Wizards hat’. They date from the Jurassic period – about 200 to 145 million years ago – and are what remains from the great mélange during tectonic subduction processe ...[Read More]

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

The Netherlands: In search of the oldest rocks of a muddy country

The Netherlands: In search of the oldest rocks of a muddy country

Technically speaking, the Netherlands isn’t really a city, even though it is the most densely populated country in the European Union and one of the most densely populated countries in the world, with 488 people/km­2. It is a delta, and for many people geology is not the first thing that springs to mind when thinking about the flat countryside. Large parts of the country have been more often below ...[Read More]