EGU Blogs

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GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: A spectacular rainbow

Imaggeo on Mondays: A spectacular rainbow

Back in February 2005, François Dulac and Rémi Losno worked in the field in the very remote Kerguelen Islands (also known as the Desolation Islands). Located in the southern Indian Ocean they are one, of the two, only exposed parts of the mostly submerged Kerguelen Plateau. Our work consisted in sampling atmospheric aerosols and their deposition by rain on the island, which is a meeting point for ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoSciences Column: Don’t throw out that diary – medieval journals reveal the secret of lightning

GeoSciences Column: Don’t throw out that diary – medieval journals reveal the secret of lightning

When 17th century Japanese princess Shinanomiya Tsuneko took note of an afternoon storm in her diary one humid Kyoto summer, she could not have imagined her observations would one day help resolve a longstanding scientific conundrum. Statistical analysis of her journals has revealed a link between lightning strikes and the solar wind – proving that your teenage diary could contain good scien ...[Read More]

GeoLog

EGU 2018: Registration open

EGU 2018: Registration open

The EGU General Assembly brings together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting that covers all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The conference is taking place in Vienna on 8–13 April 2018, providing an opportunity for both established scientists and early career researchers to present their work and discuss their ideas with experts in all fields of the geoscie ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Autumnal Larch

Imaggeo on Mondays: Autumnal Larch

For a fantastically picturesque train ride, consider travelling by rail between Lanquart and Davos (in Switzerland). You’ll be rewarded with stunning Alpine views, especially in autumn when the Larches, surrounded by Spruces, turn yellow and cast pretty reflections in the waters of the mountain lakes. Seen here is Schwartzsee, located only a few meters from ‘Davos Laret’ train station. Imaggeo is ...[Read More]

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

How Rome and its geology are strongly connected

How Rome and its geology are strongly connected

Walking through an ancient and fascinating city like Rome, there are signs of history everywhere. The whole city forms an open-air museum, full of remnants of many different times the city has known, from the Imperial to the Medieval times, the Renaissance, the Fascist period, and finally the present day version of Rome. For historians and archaeologists, unravelling the exact history of the city ...[Read More]

Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

A little fracture can go a long way: How experiments illuminate our understanding of volcanic eruptions

A little fracture can go a long way: How experiments illuminate our understanding of volcanic eruptions

What controls how violently a volcano erupts? Stratovolcanoes like Mount St Helens (USA), Gunung Merapi (Indonesia), or Volcán de Colima (Mexico) tend to erupt in two distinct ways: effusively and/or explosively. Effusive eruptions are eruptions where lava is extruded without any major explosions. Although effusive eruptions can be dangerous, at stratovolcanoes they tend to be restricted to volcan ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Bárbara Zambelli Azevedo: Access​ ​to​ ​clean​ ​water,​ ​gender​ ​equality​ ​and​ ​geosciences

Bárbara Zambelli Azevedo: Access​ ​to​ ​clean​ ​water,​ ​gender​ ​equality​ ​and​ ​geosciences

The importance of access to safe drinking water in our lives is quite obvious. Although its relation with gender equality and sustainable development may be less so. In this article, Bárbara Zambelli Azevedo explores the relationship between the two and discusses what geoscientists can do to improve the situation. In 2017, according to the WHO, over 2.1 billion people still don’t have access to sa ...[Read More]

GeoLog

A first-timer’s guide to the 2018 General Assembly

A first-timer’s guide to the 2018 General Assembly

Will this be your first time at an EGU General Assembly? With almost 14,500 participants in a massive venue, the conference can be a confusing and, at times, overwhelming place. To help you find your way, we have compiled an introductory handbook filled with history, presentation pointers, travel tips and a few facts about Vienna and its surroundings. Download your copy of the EGU General Assembly ...[Read More]

Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

Update on the Agung volcanic eruption in Indonesia

Update on the Agung volcanic eruption in Indonesia

Since our last blog, Agung has had two months to reflect and has recently begun a strong ash venting process, with incandescence visible at night in the summit. Updates from Magma Indonesia, the official communications hub for natural hazards in Indonesia, have highlighted an elevated level of volcanic tremor and an evacuation zone to 12 km radius around the volcano is being enforced. You can foll ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Angular unconformity

Imaggeo on Mondays: Angular unconformity

It is not unusual to observe abrupt contacts between two, seemingly, contiguous rock layers, such as the one featured in today’s featured image. This type of contact is called an unconformity and marks two very distinct times periods, where the rocks formed under very different conditions. Telheiro Beach is located at the western tip of the Algarve; Portugal’s southernmost mainland region and the ...[Read More]