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GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Križna jama

Imaggeo On Monday: Križna jama

The Križna jama Cave on the east side of the periodic Cerknica Lake in Slovenia is an underground karstic cave primarily famous as a rich site of bones of the extinct cave bear, Ursus speleus. The eight kilometer long cave is full of stalagmites and stalactites (sometimes called drip-stone decorations) and also boasts 50 underground lakes separated by sinter barriers through which crystal clear wa ...[Read More]

G
Geodesy

Geodesists on Tour: On the left side of the road for getting the g

Geodesists on Tour: On the left side of the road for getting the g

Getting the small g (the absolute gravity value) outdoors has always been some sort of a challenge. But, in the early 2000s the possibility to measure gravity has changed by the arrival of the first A10 absolute gravimeters. They to a large extent revolutionized the approach of performing gravity measurements in the open field and with that improved the approach to design and measure national grav ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Congratulations to the winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2021

Congratulations to the winners of the EGU Best Blog Posts of 2021

At EGU, we like to believe that a new year is more meaningful when we pause to look back at the year gone by – just a brief glimpse to appreciate all our good work and progress! 2021 was certainly an excellent year for our blogging network at EGU. Across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog and division blogs we had so many inspiring, thought-provoking and even entertaining posts this year. Thank you t ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Quartz – sericite mylonite, Calamita, Elba

Imaggeo On Monday: Quartz – sericite mylonite, Calamita, Elba

Concomitant thrusting and magmatism resulted in the development of ductile mylonites in the Calamita Schists, part of the contact aureole of the Late Miocene Porto Azzurro pluton. This mylonite is made up of stretched and recrystallized quartz layers, interlayered with thin sericite-rich levels. Sericite resulted from the crushing of contact-metamorphic minerals such as andalusite, cordierite, and ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

seismoART: Visualising earthquakes through their ground motions

seismoART: Visualising earthquakes through their ground motions

Martijn van den Ende, a Postdoctoral research fellow at Université Côte d’Azur, takes us through his seismoArt project – a new and colourful way of visualising the ground motions of earthquakes!   First of all: how does it work? Imagine that you have an incredibly steady hand, holding a pen, and a piece of paper on a table. Once you put your pen on the paper, an earthquake happens ...[Read More]

GeoLog

The James Webb Telescope may forever alter our view of the universe

The James Webb Telescope may forever alter our view of the universe

Where is Webb? This seemingly simple question is quickly making its way into everyday conversation, and not just in scientific and astronomy circles. After a long 32-year wait, NASA officially launched the James Webb Telescope a couple of weeks ago on 25 December 2021. More recently, the telescope deployed its final primary mirror segment on 8 January this year, a crucial milestone in its mission ...[Read More]

GeoLog

What if a tsunami’s magnetic field could predict the height of the wave?

What if a tsunami’s magnetic field could predict the height of the wave?

It’s been well established that tsunamis generate magnetic fields as they move seawater (which is conductive unlike freshwater) through the Earth’s magnetic field. Although researchers previously predicted that the tsunami’s magnetic field would arrive before a change in sea level, they lacked the means to simultaneously measure magnetics and sea level to confirm this phenomenon. Now, a new study ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

“State of the ECS”: What to do in 2022?

“State of the ECS”: What to do in 2022?

Hello all, Matthew here wishing you a very Happy New Year! A new year provides an opportunity for a fresh start, a chance to reflect on the past and look to the future. I don’t know about you, but 2021 was a rather mixed bag for me, with strict lockdowns gradually fading into freedoms (and back again…). 2022 still holds many uncertainties, but I do hope that as a community we can come together aga ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Artificial peridotite takes its gold coat off

Imaggeo On Monday: Artificial peridotite takes its gold coat off

Sometimes in order to test a theory about how processes work below the surface of the Earth, scientists need to recreate minerals found in very specific circumstances. This photograph was taken through a binocular microscope during a critical step of the creation of artificial peridotite: extraction of the artificial peridotite from its gold capsule. The sample is a little cylinder, 3 mm long with ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoPolicy: What’s new in 2022?

GeoPolicy: What’s new in 2022?

2021 was yet another year of uncertainty, with many changes and disruptions to our plans, activities, and goals. EGU’s science for policy programme was no exception to this with the Science for Policy Pairing Scheme and annual Science for Policy Event taking a back seat. We hope that 2022 will not only bring new activities but also rekindle those that were put on hold as a result of the pandemic. ...[Read More]