EGU Blogs

Highlights

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Geoscientific selfie at the Dead Sea

Imaggeo On Monday: Geoscientific selfie at the Dead Sea

This is an aerial image taken from a balloon at around 150m height, at the eastern shoreline of the Dead Sea. Such “selfies” are scientifically valuable, providing important data that help researchers to analyze the morphology of the retreating lake and investigate associated hazards like sinkholes, subsidence and landslides. The older shorelines, visible as lines on the shore stand fo ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

The Sassy Scientist – Dress Code Delirium

The Sassy Scientist – Dress Code Delirium

Unsettled by a well-nigh void wardrobe, Giuseppe bethinks himself of his scholarly stature and posits to moot that his foibles and idiosyncrasies are promulgated through a predilection for plebeian raiments: What should a scientist dress like? Dear Giuseppe, Firstly, heave thine integral collection of aforementioned raiments atop a scorching blaze and instill upon thyself the manner they evanesce. ...[Read More]

GeoLog

New EGU webinar: Careers outside Academia

New EGU webinar: Careers outside Academia

Last week EGU hosted the second of our official quarterly webinar series, on Careers outside Academia. Up to 70% of scientists will transition to careers outside of academia after their PhD. Transferable scientific skills and knowledge are becoming progressively valued in non-academic job sectors. However, navigating job opportunities and transitioning to different career paths can be difficult. T ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo On Monday: Patterns in the landform

Imaggeo On Monday: Patterns in the landform

The badlands at the Zabriskie Point (Death Valley, California, USA) rest upon a mudstone foundation. In the prehistoric lakes of Death Valley, fine grained sediments were deposited to form soft rocks. The clay minerals in the mudstone are shaped like tiny plates, which helps create the layers. The combination of the almost impermeable mudstone and Death Valley’s low rainfall makes plant grow ...[Read More]

WaterUnderground

Calling on hydrologists to help each other with emergency remote teaching

Calling on hydrologists to help each other with emergency remote teaching

By Tom Gleeson, Adam Ward, Anne Jefferson, and Skuyler Herzog Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are in the same situation: all of a sudden ‘pivoting’ to online teaching, which is probably better called ‘emergency remote teaching’ since few of us have the background, training, and resources to purposefully develop online courses. Fortunately, this response has also catalyzed the open sharing ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

Geosciences Column: Thunderstorm asthma, the unexpected impact of lightning storms on pollen allergies.

In October 2015 a series of massive thunderstorms rolled across the Eastern Mediterranean. In the hours and days that followed many people living along the Israeli coast had to go to their nearest medical centre because they were experiencing respiratory problems, which appeared very similar to asthma. But what could have caused these breathing problems? Well in research recently published in Natu ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Careers outside of academia

Careers outside of academia

You’ve just finished your PhD or postdoc… now what? Perhaps you’re thinking of a non-academic career, but don’t know where to start, or which skills you need? Up to 70% of scientists move into non-academic careers after graduation (The Royal Society, 2010). But finding useful information and advice is hard. In today’s blog, we summarise the EGU Webinar ‘Careers outside of academia’ which took plac ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

Happy blog birthday!

Happy blog birthday!

This week, the EGU Blog Team is authorised by me to buy itself a cake with 3 little candles on top to celebrate the fact that we have been blogging about geodynamics for 3 years! Hooray! We have had a particularly successful year, so let’s have a look at what happened. What did we do? At the start of this blog year, we reorganised how the blog team functions to relieve a bit of the pressure ...[Read More]

NH
Natural Hazards

Mount Saint Helens 40 years later – May 18, 1980: for everything to stay the same, everything must change

Mount Saint Helens 40 years later – May 18, 1980: for everything to stay the same, everything must change

Vancouver, Vancouver, this is it! Just a few words radioed by volcanologist David ‘Dave’ Johnston on May 18, 1980, to USGS headquarter in Vancouver, Washington State. It was 8:32 a.m., and a few hours later he lost his life during the (in)famous Mount Saint Helens eruption. That day, exactly forty years ago, the eruption of Mount St. Helen upset the world. It all started with a collapse on the nor ...[Read More]