CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Cryospheric Sciences

Image of the week: The Song of Sastrugi

Wavy ice feature in front of wide blue sky.

Sastrugi are significant features in glaciology, providing valuable insights into wind patterns, snow dynamics, and surface processes. So although at first sight they may be easy to walk over (quite literally), their patterns and features can tell us more than you might think, so next time take a moment to look and see the story they have to tell…   The Song of Sastrugi The wind’s icy b ...[Read More]

Cryoscientist life stories – an interview with our incoming deputy division president, Daniel Farinotti

A profile image of a white man with beard, shirt and pullover in front of a glacier landscape.

We would like to introduce Daniel Farinotti to you, our Cryosphere Division incoming deputy president, who will take over as division president from 2025-2027. For that, our Cryosphere Division outreach officer, Larissa van der Laan, interviewed Daniel at the EGU General Assembly in April 2024, to ask him a few questions about himself and his view of this exciting role within the EGU. Larissa: Hi ...[Read More]

Cryo Comm – Explaining ice core science with “cool” educational videos

Cryo Comm – Explaining ice core science with “cool” educational videos

Mastering the art of science communication is becoming more and more important, especially in the realm of climate science! Training and practice can really help PhD students acquire this skill. With this in mind, the DEEPICE project, a training network of 15 PhD students, has developed a wide range of activities to train the DEEPICE students, including the creation of a series of educational vide ...[Read More]

You thought it was over? Here’s more on the 2023 Antarctic sea-ice extent record low

A figure showing several lines for several years of sea ice extent. They look like a wave with the minimum around february each year and the maximum around october.

  In November last year (see this post), we promised to provide you an update of what happened with Antarctic sea ice during the year 2023 – a year of an exceptionally low extent. In this post, we try our best to discuss the conditions that lead to (part of) the recent loss in Antarctic sea ice, including atmospheric and ocean processes. How sea ice usually works… One of the ways scientists h ...[Read More]

Are you ready for EGU 2024?

Are you ready for EGU 2024?

Are you planning on attending the EGU General Assembly happening very shortly in Vienna, Austria? – We are! As every year, we are very much looking forward to connecting with you during the various events and are very excited to already share some of our highlights with you today. Keep an eye open on social media for daily cryosphere highlights during EGU! Would you like to meet us? Find us ...[Read More]

The joy of collecting snow meltwater: a problem-solving hunt for meltwater in Northern Finland

The joy of collecting snow meltwater: a problem-solving hunt for meltwater in Northern Finland

We know that climate change is affecting many aspects of what we have considered “stable” throughout a long period of modern times. One of many impacted and changing factors is snow and thereby also snow meltwater. One way to study meltwater is to trace it by the usage of stable water isotope signals and we plan to use it by asking: Are we underestimating the portions of snow meltwater in differen ...[Read More]

Did you know? We can see what’s going on inside an ice shelf using geophysics!

Did you know? We can see what’s going on inside an ice shelf using geophysics!

Understanding what is going on inside an ice shelf is important for many reasons. But mostly, it allows us to better understand their contribution to sea level rise, and to understand how they are changing and evolve over time, with our changing climate. Geophysical methods offer a means to be able to see inside an ice shelf, and get an idea of their properties. Read on to find out a bit more abou ...[Read More]

SciComm notes: can Granny understand your science?

A conversation between a person and a smiling elder lady.

As an EGU division blog, we facilitate that the most recent cryoscientific insights reach a wider audience. To do this, we have a team of experienced editors (and former authors), but we also love helping first time authors getting experience with outreach. But if you have ever written an outreach piece, you might know that it can be more difficult than expected to write down your research in simp ...[Read More]

Did you know that a lack of Arctic shipping regulation has detrimental environmental effects?

Did you know that a lack of Arctic shipping regulation has detrimental environmental effects?

Increased maritime transport in the Arctic, facilitated by the reduction in sea ice cover, is causing tremendous harm to an already vulnerable part of the world. Insufficient regulation of Arctic shipping has detrimental environmental effects on a global scale. These effects include, e.g. underwater noise pollution, oil spill risk and threats to the global climate. But did you know what role regul ...[Read More]

Ice-Hot News – You have a “cool” new Policy Point of Contact in the Cryosphere Division!

Ice-Hot News – You have a “cool” new Policy Point of Contact in the Cryosphere Division!

At the 2023 EGU General Assembly, our cryosphere division members all voted “YES!” to have a division policy point of contact! If you’re wondering how to engage in science policy at our division level, what a division policy officer does, who was named and what happened next… This blog post should answer a lot of these questions (or I hope)! First off, a little history about how policy officers ca ...[Read More]