GeoLog

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Science above the Amazon rainforest

Imaggeo on Mondays: Science above the Amazon rainforest

The color and symmetry of the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) sticks out against the endless green of the rainforest. Built in a remote and pristine location, the ATTO tower is the tallest construction in South America. In a joint Brazilian-German project, atmospheric scientists aim to unravel the interaction of pristine rainforest with the atmosphere. With its height of 325 meters, the ATTO tower allows for studying atmospheric processes at different spatial scales.

Description by Achim Edtbauer, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few hours left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Have coffee, Vienna style

Experience the true delights of Viennese coffee at Cafe Prükel. Strong and delicious – even better with a slice of your favourite cake. http://www.prueckel.at/

Immerse yourself in Austrian artwork

Experience the work of Gustav Klimt, one of Austria’s most famous painters in a special exhibition on his work. https://www.belvedere.at/Beyond_Klimt

Explore the city by bike

One of the best ways to see Vienna is by bike – there’s no shortage of great tours around the city. Better yet, hire your own and take a trip along the Danube. https://www.vienna-unwrapped.com/vienna-tours-by-bike/

An evening of space science

Enjoy a mega space science celebration at Vienna’s Natural History Museum. Celebrate the first human in space and 50 years since the Moon landing with a talk from ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer. https://der-orion.com/aktuell/termine/orion-termine/1617-yuri-s-night-2019?fbclid=IwAR1kGPGKSujeoyhr9kVMacWTqVpsXKdTSFTlpEMziOmUqIsN7SElumMDk-o

Cafe Prückel, Vienna, Austria. (Credit: Andreas.poeschek by CC-BY-SA-2.0-at via Wikimedia Commons)

Seasonal markets – Easter

Visit one of the seasonal Easter markets where you can watch artists at work, see Easter decoration from different countries and snack on Austrian specialities.

http://www.visitingvienna.com/sights/eastermarkets/am-hof-ostermarkt/

Vienna Blues Spring – a Musical Festival

Enjoy some of the best local and international blues musicians. http://www.visitingvienna.com/entertainment/events/blues-spring/

Discover the work of modernist female artists

“City of women” is a long overdue exhibition of the works of Viennese artists that made a significant contribution to the artistic scene in Austria between 1900 and 1938. https://www.belvedere.at/city_of_women

Pritzker winner architecture

Explore modern architectural wonders designed by Pritzker winners such as Jean Nouvel, Zaha Hadid and the Herzog & de Meuron duo. https://www.wien.info/en/sightseeing/architecture-design/by-nobel-prize-winners

By Sara Mynott, Anastasia Kokori and Maria Rubal, Press Assistants at the EGU General Assembly

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Competition 2019!

The selection committee received over 600 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants at the 2019 General Assembly have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  of the conference and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to 2019’s fantastic photographers!

 

43°29’S 147°08’E – Meet me at the lighthouse. Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Light pollution is an environmental hazard we often overlook. When I had the chance to view the Southern Hemisphere’s night sky with only the Antarctic Ocean in front of me, I realised how much we have already lost in the Northern Hemisphere and Europe. It almost seems as if the night is becoming extinct.

 

A frozen time capsule. Credit: Florian Konrad (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Schwarzmooskogel-Höhlensystem is located in the Totes Gebirge in Austria and consists of 17 individual caves with a total length of about 140km. Inside, it felt like time did not pass or just passed really slowly. The shapes that the ice had sculptured were endless and took our breath away.

 

Temporary pond within ice fall of Fox Glacier. Credit: Stefan Winkler (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu).A temporary pond of meltwater on the surface of Fox Glacier, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Due to the fast movement and the rough surface, there is not an established supraglacial or englacial meltwater system resulting in temporary ponds forming and subsequently draining during over several weeks to a few months.

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

At the Assembly 2019: Friday highlights

At the Assembly 2019: Friday highlights

The conference is coming to a close and there’s still an abundance of great sessions to attend! Here’s our guide to getting the most out of the conference on its final day. Boost this information with features from EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly – download it here.

Union-wide sessions

The final day of the conference kicks off with the last two Union sessions. The first session, Mountain Building, Volcanism, Climate and Biodiversity in the Andes: 250 years after Alexander von Humboldt (US2: 08:30–12:15 in Room E1), pays tribute to the 250th anniversary of the birth of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), the intrepid explorer of the Andes and other regions in the world, and the most famous scientist of his time. This symposium will recognise Alexander von Humboldt’s legacy by reviewing the state-of-the-art studies of the coupled lithosphere – atmosphere – hydrosphere – biosphere system with a focus on the Andean mountain belt.

The second and last Union session will focus on Past and future tipping points and large climate transitions in Earth history (US3: 16:15–18:00 in Room E1), The aim of the session is to point out the most recent results concerning how a complex system as the climate of the Earth has undergone many tipping points and what is the specificity of the future climate changes. You can follow both sessions on twitter #EGU19US if you’re not attending, tune in with the conference live stream.

Medal lectures

Be sure to also attend the last two medal lectures of the assembly:

Ilya Usoskin giving the 2018 Julius Bartels Medal Lecture (Credit: EGU/Foto Pfluegl)

Short courses

The last leg of short courses offers insight into new technologies, tips for publishing your work, and advice on how to develop your career and engage with the public. Here are a few of the short courses you can check out today:

Scientific sessions

The four final inter- and transdisciplinary events also take place today, covering all sorts of interesting topics, from climate sciences to geodiversity and geoheritage. Here are the last cross-disciplinary events:

It’s your last chance to make the most of the networking opportunities at the General Assembly, so get on down to the poster halls and strike up a conversation. If you’re in the queue for coffee, find out what the person ahead is investigating – you never know when you might start building the next exciting collaboration! Here are some of today’s scientific highlights:

Today we also announce the results of the EGU Photo Competition! Keep an eye on EGU’s blog and social media pages to find out who the winners are.

What have you thought of the Assembly this week? Let us know at www.egu2019.eu/feedback and help make EGU 2019 even better.

We hope you’ve had a wonderful week and look forward to seeing you in 2019! Join us on this adventure in Vienna next year, 3–8 May 2020.