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Geodynamics

Archives / 2020 / November

Geodynamics 101: Dynamic Topography

Geodynamics 101: Dynamic Topography

The Geodynamics 101 series serves to showcase the diversity of research topics and/or methods in the geodynamics community. In this week’s post, Fred Richards explains how ‘Dynamic Topography’ is used in the Geosciences, and discusses the knowns, unknowns, and the challenges ahead.  Since shortly after its tumultuous formation 4.5 billion years ago, Earth has been steadily cooling, wit ...[Read More]

The Sassy Scientist – The Final Hurdle

The Sassy Scientist – The Final Hurdle

While coming down from a caffeine-high after his online thesis submission, Giulio think about the next step: How should I prepare for my geodynamics PhD viva? Dear Giulio, I like how you omitted to specify if your viva is online or offline, but I am working under the assumption that everything happens in the virtual realm now. It seems unbelievable now that busy academics such as myself used to fl ...[Read More]

On the way back to Mercury

On the way back to Mercury

It is the smallest planet of the Solar System, the closest to the Sun and the quickest at orbiting around it, the one with the least inclined and most elongated orbit, the only one where a day lasts two-thirds of a full year, the one with the highest bulk density. Mercury is a planet of extremes, but rarely visited by space missions (compared to Mars, Venus and the Moon). This week Dr. Nicola Tosi ...[Read More]

The Sassy Scientist – Reaching For The Stars

The Sassy Scientist – Reaching For The Stars

In a world of repetitive home office clean-ups, Freya is teetering on the brink of mental breakdown. Whereas al of our brilliant suggestions, such as cooking, befriending your neighbours, brush up on your programming skills, consider a career outside academia, acquiring new hobbies or wasting your time watching silly movies, have not posed good enough of an answer to alleviate the worries floating ...[Read More]