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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

The ultimate scope of scientists is to publish their research advancement and share it with the scientific community and civil society. Researchers, whether coming from academia or research institutes, publish their results in peer-reviewed journals, that are usually highly technical and often incomprehensible to anyone except the major experts in the field. In some subjects is inevitable given th ...[Read More]

NH10 Multi-Hazards: The Latest EGU Natural Hazards Sub-Division

NH10 Multi-Hazards: The Latest EGU Natural Hazards Sub-Division

Earlier this year, the EGU Natural Hazards Division approved the addition of a new sub-division focused on the theme of ‘multi-hazards’. The Science Officers representing this sub-division, Joel Gill (British Geological Survey) and Marleen de Ruiter (IVM-VU Amsterdam), reflect on why this sub-division is necessary and how you can get involved. Many regions are affected by multiple natural hazards, ...[Read More]

Alpine rock instability events and mountain permafrost

Alpine rock instability events and mountain permafrost

Rockfalls, rock slides and rock avalanches in high mountains The terms rockfall, rock avalanche and rockslide are often used interchangeably. Different authors have proposed definitions based on volume thresholds, but the establishment of fixed boundaries can be tricky. Rockfall can be defined as the detachment of a mass of rock from a steep rock-wall, along discontinuities and/or through rock bri ...[Read More]