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Natural Hazards

Landslide hazard

Mount Saint Helens 40 years later – May 18, 1980: for everything to stay the same, everything must change

Mount Saint Helens 40 years later – May 18, 1980: for everything to stay the same, everything must change

Vancouver, Vancouver, this is it! Just a few words radioed by volcanologist David ‘Dave’ Johnston on May 18, 1980, to USGS headquarter in Vancouver, Washington State. It was 8:32 a.m., and a few hours later he lost his life during the (in)famous Mount Saint Helens eruption. That day, exactly forty years ago, the eruption of Mount St. Helen upset the world. It all started with a collapse on the nor ...[Read More]

NH medallists Episode II – John Clague & his passion for Natural Hazard

NH medallists Episode II – John Clague & his passion for Natural Hazard

In today’s interview, we talk with Prof John J. Clague, who was awarded the 2020 Sergey Soloviev Medal for his remarkable scientific contributions in fundamental and applied research on earthquakes, tsunamis, outburst floods and landslides, directed towards risk reduction for the benefit of societies. Hi John, can you please briefly introduce yourself, telling your main research focus and wh ...[Read More]

How satellites measuring soil moisture provide a new understanding of rainfall patterns

How satellites measuring soil moisture provide a new understanding of rainfall patterns

Soil moisture and rainfall are the two fundamental variables in the water and energy cycle and their knowledge in many applications is crucial. For instance, for predicting the occurrence and the magnitude of flood and landslide events the knowledge of the initial soil moisture condition and of rainfall amount is mandatory. In the last decade, some authors have proposed a completely new approach, ...[Read More]

The Italian catalogue of earthquake-induced ground failures: saving the past for the future seismic hazard assessment #CEDIT

The Italian catalogue of earthquake-induced ground failures: saving the past for the future seismic hazard assessment #CEDIT

  The Italian Catalogue of Earthquake-Induced Ground Failures (CEDIT) is a database available online since January 2013 that stores data about ground failures induced by strong earthquakes, which occurred on the Italian territory since 1000 AD up to now. CEDIT is freely available on a web-GIS portal (currently the access is granted using Firefox as a web browser, the upgrade to other browsers ...[Read More]