NH
Natural Hazards

Early Career Scientists

Behind the scene: knowing the President of the EGU Natural Hazard Division – Ira Didenkulova!

Behind the scene: knowing the President of the EGU Natural Hazard Division – Ira Didenkulova!

In this last post of 2019, I have the pleasure to ask some questions to Ira Didenkulova, the President of the EGU Natural Hazards division who has been recently elected for a second mandate.   Ira, can you introduce yourself and tell what led you the position of EGU Natural Hazard (NH) Division president? What are the main challenges you had and what’s next for the NH division? It seems this ...[Read More]

Time for submissions: sessions proposed by NhET at the next EGU General Assembly!

Time for submissions: sessions proposed by NhET at the next EGU General Assembly!

We are getting closer to 2020 and one of the first deadlines is for the submission of abstracts for the next EGU General Assembly (GA) in Wien, from the 3rd to the 8th of May 2020. The Natural hazards Early career scientist Team (NhET) has proposed several sessions and short courses also for next GA. Below you can find a list of them.   We also remind that there is an opportunity for financia ...[Read More]

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

The ultimate scope of scientists is to publish their research advancement and share it with the scientific community and civil society. Researchers, whether coming from academia or research institutes, publish their results in peer-reviewed journals, that are usually highly technical and often incomprehensible to anyone except the major experts in the field. In some subjects is inevitable given th ...[Read More]

Cyclone Fani: A success in weather forecast and disaster preparedness

Cyclone Fani: A success in weather forecast and disaster preparedness

Hurricane, cyclone and typhoon are different terms for the same weather phenomenon: torrential rain and maximum sustained wind speeds (near centre) exceeding 119 km/hour (World Meteorological Organization https://public.wmo.int/en). The terminology depends on the region (e.g. in the western North Pacific, they are called typhoons; in the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea they are named as cyclones ...[Read More]