NH
Natural Hazards
Avatar photo

Asimina Voskaki

My name is Asimina Voskaki, and I am a Doctoral Researcher working on analysing climate risk in an airport context. I am a geologist with an MSc in environmental planning and an MRes in airport environmental strategy assessment and water management efficiency. I am passionate about climate resilience and using my skills to support organisations to prepare for, mitigate the impact and recover from the effects of climate change.

Behind the scenes: The EGU Natural Hazards Division Blog Editorial Team unveiled!

Behind the scenes: The EGU Natural Hazards Division Blog Editorial Team unveiled!

2023 draws to a close. Looking back, our NH Division Blog has rolled out 20 different posts! We’ve chatted with awesome medallists, tackled current challenges in natural hazards, and showcased key projects and activities in the field. But who are the lovely and creative minds behind this? In this year’s final post, we’re going to find out together.   The Blog Editorial Team is cu ...[Read More]

Is culture the missing link to disaster risk reduction?

The City of Kobe, Chuo Ward (photo credit: Asimina Voskaki)

Sophocles, a great tragic writer of Classical Athens, said that “success is dependent on effort”. When it comes to disaster risk reduction, are we doing enough to develop a culture of resilience and how do cultural factors affect people’s willingness to protect themselves and build an effective disaster reduction and reconstruction mechanism? In 1995 (17/01/1995), Kobe, Osaka (Ja ...[Read More]

Five (or more) reasons why… you should become a blog editor about natural hazards!

Five (or more) reasons why… you should become a blog editor about natural hazards!

If you want to be a blog editor about natural hazards… This post is for you! The EGU Natural Hazards Division Blog Editorial Team is looking for new motivated blog editors to join our interdisciplinary and inclusive team. Now you are wondering why you should join us. There are plenty of good reasons, indeed. In this blog post, we will do our best to convince you that becoming part of our editorial ...[Read More]

Understanding and assessing hydrological extremes, a discussion with Alberto Viglione

Photo credit: Image by Dean Moriarty from Pixabay (Pixabay License)

Extreme hydrological events affect billions of people worldwide, and their negative impacts will likely increase due to climate change, urbanisation and ageing infrastructure. Further understanding of hydrological extremes and societal responses to floods is critical in mitigating flood risk and creating better urban environments. In today’s interview, we talk with Prof. Alberto Viglione. Al ...[Read More]