GD
Geodynamics

Join the EGU GD Blog Team!

Join the EGU GD Blog Team!

We are looking for both regular editors and Sassy Scientist columnists for the new ‘EGU year’ (which, by our definition runs from the week after EGU GA 2020 up to and including EGU GA 2021, i.e., May 11, 2020 – May 2, 2021)!
Being an editor is lots of fun and you will be welcomed in a small, but dedicated team. You will have the opportunity to meet lots of people from the geodynamics community and boost your own profile within the geodynamics community. Interested? Send an e-mail to: i.vanzelst@leeds.ac.uk

:man_dancing: You give back to the community and EGU
:sun_with_face: You learn new concepts and ideas


Tobias Meier – Editor

“Being a blog editor helped me get in touch with a lot of interesting people and broaden my knowledge in geodynamics.
When I started as an editor I did not have a lot of experience with blogs and I was also still quite new to the field of geodynamics. But being an editor of the EGU geodynamics blog helped me to broaden my knowledge in geoydnamics and to get to know a lot of other geodynamicists. Especially at conferences, being an editor is definitely a big advantage because you can easily get in contact with a lot of different people. Also, the whole blog team is always there to help if you struggle to find a guest author or something to write.”


:tumbler_glass: You practise distilling terminology/concepts for a broader audience

:male_mage: You put your outreach hat on


Antoine Rozel – Editor
“Being an editor for the EGU GD blog has been a great way for me to stay in closer contact with colleagues from everywhere around the world and gave me a good reason to contact people I met around. It is also a great way to help young researchers to advertise their work. The blog is very open to lots of topics, not necessarily only related to science. So, being an editor made me think quite a lot about which directions science and especially academics could take. Overall being an editor places you in the center of the community: a bit like a citizen and not only as a worker. I do feel like I am an active part of something that is worth it!

Editors give opportunities to people; this is a very nice feeling.”


:+1: You get a sneak preview

:t-rex: You are part of the EGU GD behind-the-scenes crew

Regular editors are required to provide blog posts every few weeks (depending on the amount of editors). These posts can be either written by the editor themselves or commissioned: you invite a guest author and then edit their blog post. There is a comprehensive schedule so that the whole team stays on track. I will help you settle in as an editor and I can help you meet your deadlines. Since everyone is busy, there is a lot of flexibility in the schedule and everyone on the team helps each other out in case of unexpected busy-ness!

The Sassy Scientist is an anonymous columnist who writes weekly posts. If you want to be the next Sassy Scientist, you will be sworn to secrecy for life! So unfortunately, this is not a CV booster. However: it is incredibly fun. You can say anything you want as our own, anonymous Sassy Scientist and share your uncensored opinion with the world in a post dripping with sarcasm. In consultation with me (the ‘editor-in-chief’) and others, we will figure out a schedule that works for you, such that you do not have to provide a blog post every week (but the Sassy Scientist still uploads every week… *oooohhh*). So, in effect, you might become a part-time Sassy Scientist to minimise the workload associated with the busy upload schedule!

:hedgehog: You will constantly be reminded that English grammar can be a pain… you are not alone!

Are you interested in becoming an editor or a Sassy Scientist columnist? Do you have any questions before committing to a year of joyous blogging? Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me by e-mailing to i.vanzelst@leeds.ac.uk. Hopefully I can soon welcome you in our lovely team!

Iris van Zelst
Iris is a postdoc at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom. Her current research revolves around intermediate-depth seismicity and the geodynamic modelling of subducting plates. Her recently completed PhD was on the modelling of tsunamigenic earthquakes using a range of interdisciplinary modelling approaches, such as geodynamic, dynamic rupture, and tsunami modelling. Iris is Editor-in-chief of the GD blog team. You can reach Iris via email. For more details, please visit Iris' personal webpage.


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