NH
Natural Hazards

Jonathan Rizzi

I have a bachelor in GIS and Remote Sensing and a master and a PhD in Environmental Sciences. Since several years, I work in the field of Climate Change and Risk assessment. I worked with the University of Venice and the Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change, while travelling across the world, from China to Ecuador. For three years, I have been working in Norway, first as postdoc at the University of Oslo, and now as researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research. My research focus is now mainly on climate change and forestry. I think that one of the most positive aspect of being a researcher is meet and cooperate with many people; therefore, I strongly believe networking initiatives are particularly useful. I am one of the founder of NhET and I think the Blog will be a great channel to engage more ECS - and more experienced researcher as well - working on Natural Hazard.

Time for submissions: sessions proposed by NhET at the next EGU conference!

The new year is approaching, and at the beginning of 2019, there is also the deadline for the submission of abstracts for the next EGU conference in Wien, from the 7th to the 12th of April 2019. The Natural hazards Early career scientist Team has proposed many sessions and short courses. Below you can find a list of them.

 

We also remind that there is the opportunity for financial support to attend EGU. The deadline to apply and submit the abstract is the 1st of December and more information can be found on the dedicated section of the website of EGU19.

 

SESSIONS

Remember:you can submit an abstract to a session until the 10th of January 2019, 13:00 CET. And don’t forget the One-Abstract Rule, what does it mean? “Authors are allowed as first author to submit either one regular abstract plus one abstract solicited by a convener, or two solicited abstracts. A second regular abstract can be submitted to the EOS programme group (the maximum number of abstracts, including solicited abstracts, remains two)”. You can submit following the links of each session below.

 

Session NH6.7/BG2.61/GI3.21/SSS13.17

Hazard and risk assessment of climate related impacts on Agricultural and Forested Ecosystems using Remote Sensing and modelling (co-organized)

Convener: Jonathan Rizzi  | Co-conveners: Luigi Lombardo, Mahesh Rao, Wenwu Zhao

Abstract submission

 

Session NH9.11/ESSI1.8/GI1.11/GMPV6.3/HS11.44/SM3.7/SSS13.19

Methods and Tools for Natural Risk Management and Communications – Innovative ways of delivering information to end users and sharing data among the scientific community (co-organized)

Convener: Raffaele Albano  | Co-conveners: Valeria Cigala, Jonathan Rizzi

Abstract submission

 

Session NH9.5

Hazard and Risk Databases

Convener: Emanuela Toto

Abstract submission

 

Session NH1.8/HS11.61

Implementation of Flood Directive in different countries (co-organized)

Convener: Emanuela Toto | Co-convener: Nilay Dogulu

Abstract submission

 

SHORT COURSES

Short courses are open to everyone, but we invite you to pre-register in order to help to organize the course in the best way (not mandatory). You can find pre-registration forms in the courses’ description.

 

Session SC1.49/NH10.2

The “Social” in Disaster Resilience: Risk Perception and Preparedness (co-organized)  Convener: Canay Doğulu  | Co-conveners: Mariana Madruga de Brito , Jonathan Rizzi

 

Session SC2.11

Research speed dating

Convener: Luigi Lombardo  | Co-conveners: Mariana Madruga de Brito , Jonathan Rizzi , Giulia Roder

 

Session SC2.10

Serious games for Natural Hazards: understand the different roles in natural hazard prevention and management through a simple exercise

Convener: Valeria Cigala  | Co-conveners: Francisco Cáceres , Graziella Devoli , Canay Doğulu , Jonathan Rizzi

Bridging the gap between science and decision makers – a new tool for nuclear emergencies affecting food and agriculture

Bridging the gap between science and decision makers – a new tool for nuclear emergencies affecting food and agriculture

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has developed an online system to assist in improving the response capabilities of authorities in the event of an emergency caused by natural hazards. This tool provides a clear overview of radioactive contamination of crops and agricultural lands through improved data management and visualization, it also assists in decision support processes by suggesting management actions to decision makers. In this interview, we have the pleasure to introduce Ms Amelia Lee Zhi Yi, working at the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture to speak about DSS4NAFA, said system that will be extensively discussed hereafter.

1)  Nuclear Emergency Response (NER) for food and agriculture – why is that important and what does that entail?

In the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, the response should be performed swiftly in the interest of human health. After ensuring the well-being of the population, it is necessary to prioritize the assessment of possible radioactive contamination of crops and agricultural lands to avoid ingestion of radioactivity.

Proper data management, data visualization and risk communication are essential for efficient response to a nuclear emergency. Factors that should be considered for such response include support for sampling and laboratory analysis, optimal allocation of manpower and analytical instruments, and integrated communication between stakeholders.

To make well-informed decisions on for instance planting and food restrictions, food safety authorities need to have a good understanding of the radiological conditions after a fallout event. This is accomplished through the collection of environmental samples such as soil and plants, and food products that are then analysed using consistent methods in qualified laboratories. Further, these data should be displayed in an intuitive manner so that authorities will be able to interpret the data under stressful, time-bound conditions. Finally, to reduce confusion and clearly communicate decisions made to the public, standardized communication protocols of the decisions made by policymakers need to be implemented. [Read More]

Ethics and Geosciences: discovering the International Association for Promoting Geoethics

Ethics and Geosciences: discovering the International Association for Promoting Geoethics

Geoscientists do not have to deal only with technical matters, but have to think also about the ethical implications related to their discipline. To increase the awareness of researchers on the ethical aspects of their activities, it has been created the International Association for Promoting Geoethics (IAPG). To better understand what geoethics and the IAPG are, we interviewed Silvia Peppoloni, founder member and Secretary General of the association. She is researcher at the Italian Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology and her activity covers the fields of geohazards and georisks. She is also elected councillor of the IUGS – International Union of Geological Sciences (2018-2022), member of the Executive Council of the IAEG Italy – International Association of Engineering Geology and the Environment, lecturer to international conferences, editor and author of books and articles,. She has also been awarded with prizes for science communication and natural literature in 2014, 2016 and 2017.

 

Can you clarify what is geoethics?

Geoethics is defined as the “Research and reflection on the values that underpin appropriate behaviours and practices, wherever human activities interact with the Earth system. Geoethics deals with the ethical, social and cultural implications of geoscience knowledge, education, research, practice, and communication, and with the social role and responsibility of geoscientists in conducting their activities”.

This definition includes aspects of general ethics, research integrity, professional ethics, and environmental ethics. It reminds to geoscientists about individual ethical conduct, which is characterized by the awareness of being also a social actor, of possessing a scientific knowledge that can be put to the service of society and employed for a more functional interaction between humans and the Earth system.

[Read More]