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GD Guide to EGU19

GD Guide to EGU19

With this year’s EGU General Assembly (GA; #EGU19) looming in less than a week, it’s time for all attendees to finish (or start) their own scientific contributions, create their own personal programs as well as plan other activities during the conference. In this blog Nico Schliffke (GD ECS Rep) would like to share some useful advice how to successfully navigate through the conference and highlight relevant activities, both scientific and social, for Geodynamics Early Career Scientists (ECS).

The huge variety of scientific contributions (~18,000 at EGU18) might seem intimidating to begin with and makes it impossible for any individual to keep track of everything. To be well prepared for the conference, allow for a bit of time to create your own personal programme by logging in with your account details and search for relevant sessions, keywords, authors, friends or any other fields of interest. If you have found anything interesting, add it to your personal programme by ticking the ‘star’. After completing your personal programme you can print your own timetable or open it in the EGU 2019 app.

Besides all the (specific) scientific content of the GA, EGU19 offers a wide spread of exciting workshops and short courses to boost your personal and career skills, as well great debates, union wide events and division social events. Below you will find a list of highlight events, special ECS targeted events, social events and other things to keep in mind and to make the best of EGU19:

For first time attendees:

How to navigate the EGU: tips and tricks (Mon, 08:30 – 10:15, Room -2.16) – This workshop is led by several EGU ECS representatives and will give an overview of procedures during EGU as well as useful tips and tricks how to successfully navigate the GA.

GD workshops and short courses:

Geodynamics 101A: Numerical methods (Thur, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.62) Building on last year’s short course, we are happy to announce two short courses this year as a part of the ’Solid Earth 101’ series together with Seismology 101 and Geology 101. The first course deals with the basic concepts of numerical modelling, including discretisation of governing equations, building models, benchmarking (among others).

Geodynamics 101B: Large-scale dynamical processes (Fri, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.62)  The second short course will discuss the applications of geodynamical modelling. It will cover a state-of-art overview of main large-scale dynamics on Earth (mantle convection, continental breakup, subduction dynamics, crustal deformation..) but also discuss constraints coming from seismology (tomography) or the geological record.

Geology 101: The (hi)story of rocks (Tue, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.62)The complementary workshop in the 101 series: Find more about structural and petrological processes on Earth. It’s definitely worth knowing, otherwise why should we be doing many of these Geodynamical models?

Seismology 101 (Wed, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.62)The second complementary workshop in the 101 series. Many geodynamical models are based on observations using seismological methods. Find out more about earthquakes, beachballs and what semiologists are actually measuring – this is essential for any numerical or analogue geodynamical model!

GD related award ceremonies and lectures:

Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECS Lecture by Mathew Domeier (Tue, 12:00-12:30 Room -2.21) – The Arne Richter award is an union-wide award for young scientists. We are happy to see that Mathew as a Geodynamicist has won the medal this year! Come along and listen to his current research.

Augustus Love Medal Lecture by Anne Davaille (Thur, 14:45-15:45, Room D1) – Listen to the exciting work of the first female winner of the Augustus Love Medal (the GD division award), Anne Davaille! She is specialised on experimental and analytical fluid dynamics which has given Geodynamics many new insights.

 Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture by Jean Braun  (Tue, 12:45-13:45, Room E1) – This one of the most prestigious EGU award for solid Earth geosciences. Jean is a geodynamicist from Potsdam and works on integrating surface and lithospheric dynamics into numerical models.

 

 

GD division social activities:

ECS GD informal lunch  (Mon, 12:30-14:00) – Come and meet the ECS team behind these GD activities! Meet in front of the conference center (look for “GD” stickers), to head to the food court in Kagran (2 subway stops away from the conference center, opposite direction to city centre).

ECS GD dinner (Wed, 19:30-22:00) – Join us for a friendly dinner at a traditional Viennese ‘Heurigen’ with fellow ECS Geodynamicists at Gigerl – Rauhensteingasse 3, Wien 1. Bezirk!  If you would like to attend the ECS GD dinner on Wednesday, please fill out this form to keep track on the number of people: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScpi8gvDDMOOOjLbtq4BrElsoBtTv86Mud7qNQ5yl7qWP5cUA/viewform  Remember to bring some cash to pay for your own food and drinks!

GD/TS/SM drinks (Wed, after ECS GD dinner) – Don’t worry if you cannot make for the ECS GD dinner! After dinner we’ll have a 5 min walk to Bermuda Bräu – Rabensteig 6, 1010 Wien for some drinks together with ECS from Seismology (SM) and Tectonics/Structural (TS), so you can meet us there too!  

GD Division meeting (Fri, 12:45-13:45 Room D2) – Elections and reports from the division president, ECS representative and other planning in GD related matters. Lunch provided!

Meet the division president of Geodynamics (Paul Tackley) and the ECS representative (Nico Schliffke) (Wed, 11:45-12:30, EGU Booth) – Come and discuss with the president and ECS rep about any GD related issues, suggestions or remarks.

Geodynamicists eating lunch at Kagran – it’s tradition by now.

EGU wide social activities:

Networking and ECS Zone (all week – red area)This area is dedicated to early career scientist all week and provides space to chillout, get your well deserved coffee or find out more about ECS related announcements.

Opening reception (Sun, 18:30 – 21:00, Foyer F) – Don’t miss out on many new faces and friends, as well as free food and drinks and the opening (ice-breaker) reception! There will also be a ECS corner to meet fellow young scientists, especially if it’s your first EGU.

EGU Award Ceremony (Wed, 17:30 – 20:00, Room E1) – All EGU medallists will receive their award at this ceremony.

ECS Forum (Wed, 12:45 – 13:45, Room L2)An open discussion on any ECS topic

ECS Networking and Careers Reception (by invitation only) (Tue, 19:00-20:30, Room F2)

Conveners’ reception (by invitation only) (Fri 19:30 – 0:00, Foyer F) 

Credit: Kai Boggild (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Great debates

Science in policymaking: Who is responsible?  (Mon, 10:45 – 12:30, Room E1) – Actively take part in one of the presently most important and hot topic!

How can Early Career Scientists prioritise their mental wellbeing? (Tue, 19:00 – 20:30, Room E1) – Many ECS find it challenging to prioritise their mental wellbeing. Discuss with many other young scientist how to tackle this really important issue and maybe learn helpful tips how to improve your own wellbeing! 

Other useful skills to polish your career/CV:

Help! I’m presenting at a scientific conference (Mon, 14:00 –15:45, Room -2.62) – Your first conference talk might be daunting. Find out best practices and tips how to create a concise and clear conference talk.

How to share your research with citizens and why it’s so important (Mon, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.16) – Do you share your research with the public? Can you explain in simple matters? An important topic for researchers currently!

How to make the most of your PhD or postdoc experience for getting your next job in academia (Tue, 16:15 – 18:00, Room -2.85) – It’s never too early to plan your next career step.

How to convene and chair a session at the General Assembly (Tue, 08:30-10:15, Room -2.85) – Find out what it needs to convene a session of short course at EGU. You may be surprised, but you could to it next year if you liked,

How to peer-review? (Mon, 16:15 -18:00, Room -2.85) – After the end of a PhD (or sometimes even earlier!) you may be asked to peer-review journal contributions, but hardly anyone knows the process beforehand.

How to find funding and write a research grant (Tue, 10:45-12:30, Room -2.16) – One of the major tasks when you finish your PhDs. It might even be useful when writing applications for travel support etc.

Funding opportunities: ERC grants (Tue, 12:45-13:45, Room 0.14) – Find out more about these generous grants and how to successfully apply for them

How to apply for the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grants (Wed, 12:45-13:45, Room 0.14)

Balancing work and personal life as a scientist (Wed, 16:15 – 18:00, Room -2.85) – Find out how not to lose sight of your hobbies and personal life in a increasingly competitive academic environment. 

Other interesting events:

Academia is not the only route (Thu, 10:45-12:30, Room -2.16) – Are you finishing your degree and not overly excited by an academic future? Try this short course on exploring career alternatives both inside and outside academia

Games for Geoscience (Wed, 16:15-18:00 (Talks) in Room L8 and 14:00-15:45 (Posters), Hall X4) – Games are more fun than work! Learn more on how to use games for communication, outreach and much more. 

Unconscious bias (Wed, 12:45-13:45, Room -2.32) – Become aware of the obstacles that some of your colleagues face every day, and that might prevent them from doing the best science

Promoting and supporting equality of opportunities in geosciences (Thu, 14:00-18:00, Room E1) – Any of us should promote an open, equal opportunity working environment and this session promises some very interesting talk on common issues, solutions and initiatives.

What I’ve learned from teaching geosciences in prisons – (Thu, 14:00-15:45, Hall X4 – Poster) by GD ECS Phil Heron.

Rhyme Your Research (Tue, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.16) – Reveal the poet in you and explain your research in an interesting and unusual way!

This is just a small list of possible activities during EGU19, and I’m sure to have missed out many more. So keep your eyes and ears open for additional events and spread the word if you know anything of particular interest. Also make sure you follow the GD Blog, our social media (EGU GD Facebook page) and EGU Twitter, to keep updated with any more information during the week! The official hashtag is #EGU19. All the best for EGU and I am looking forward to meeting many of you there!

 

Conferences: Secret PhD Drivers

Conferences: Secret PhD Drivers

Conferences are an integral part of a PhD. They are the forum for spreading the word about the newest science and developing professional relationships. But as a PhD student they are more likely to be a source of palpitations and sweaty palms. This week Kiran Chotalia writes about her personal experience on conferences, and lessons learnt over the years.

Kiran Chotalia. PhD Student at Dept. of Earth Sciences, University College London, UK.

My PhD is a part of the Deep Volatiles Consortium and a bunch of us started on our pursuit of that floppy hat together. Our first conference adventure was an introduction to the consortium at the University of Oxford, where the new students were to present on themselves and their projects for a whole terrifying two minutes. At this stage, we had only been scientists in training for a few weeks and the thought of getting up in front of a room of established experts was scary, to say the least. Lesson #1: If it’s not a little bit scary, is it even worth doing? It means we care and we want to do the best we can. A healthy dose of fear can push us to work harder and polish our skills, making us better presenters. Overcoming the fear of these new situations takes up a lot of your energy. But it always helps to practice. In particular, I’ve always been encouraged to participate in presentation (poster or oral) competitions. Knowing that you’re going to be judged on your work and presentation skills encourages you to prepare. And this preparation has always helped to calm my nerves to the point where I’m now at the stage I can enjoy presenting a poster.

Regular work goals that crop up in other professions are often absent, especially when we’re starting out.  The build-up to a conference acts as a good focus to push for results and some first pass interpretations. At the conference itself, it makes sure people come to see your poster and you can start to get your face out there in your field. Lesson #2: Sign up for presentation competitions. AGU’s Outstanding Student Presentation Award (OSPA) and EGU’s Outstanding Student PICO and Poster (OSPP) awards are well established. At smaller conferences, it’s always worth asking if a competition is taking place as, speaking from experience, they can be easily missed. They also give you a good excuse to practice with your research group in preparation, providing the key component of improving your presentation skills: feedback. Lesson #3: Ask for feedback, not just on your science but your presenting too. If you’re presenting to people not in your field, practice with office mates that have no idea what you get up to. By practicing, you can begin to find your style of presenting and the best way to convey your science.

Me, (awkwardly) presenting my first poster at the Workshop on the Origin of Plate Tectonics, Locarno.

Sometimes, you’ll be going to conferences not only with your fellow PhD students, but also more senior members. They can introduce you to their friends and colleagues, extending your network, more often than not, when you are socialising over dinner, after the main working day. Lesson #4: Keep your ear to the ground. These events provide a great opportunity to let people know you are on the hunt for a job and hear about positions that might be right for you. At AGU 2018, I became the proud owner of a ‘Job Seeker’ badge, provided by the Careers Centre. It acted as a great way to segue from general job chat into potential leads. A memento that I’ll be hanging on to and dusting off for conferences to come!

One of the biggest changes to my conferencing cycle occurred last year after attending two meetings: CIDER and YoungCEED. Both were workshops geared towards learning and research, with CIDER lasting four weeks and YoungCEED lasting a week. Lesson #5: Attend research specific meetings when the opportunity arises. Even if they don’t seem to align with your research interests from the outset, they are incredible learning opportunities and a great way to expand your research horizons. By attending these meetings, the dynamic of my first conference after them shifted. There was a focus on catching up with the collective work started earlier in the year. Whilst the pace was the most exhausting I’ve experienced thus far, it was also the most rewarding.

Between all the learning and networking, faces start to become familiar. Before you know it, these faces become colleagues and colleagues quickly become friends. In our line of work, our friends are spread over continents, moving from institution to institution. They tend to offer the only opportunity to be in the same place at the same time. This also results in completely losing track of time and catching up into the early hours of the morning, so the next lesson is more subjective. Lesson #6: Know your limits. Some can stay out until 4am and rock up at the 8.30am talk. I wish I was one of these people but I have a hard time keeping my eyes open past 12.30am. Whatever works for you!

Me, presenting my most recent poster at AGU 2018 with my job seeker badge!

After the conference finishes, you are often in a place that you’ve never visited before. Lesson #7: Have a break. If you can, even an extra day or two of being a tourist is great treat after a hectic build-up as well as the conference itself. If staying for a mini holiday post-conference is not an option, make sure you take some time when you get home to rest and readjust before you get back to work and start planning for the next one.

Last but not least, Lesson #8: Don’t forget to have fun. The stress surrounding conferences and your PhD in general can at times be all consuming. Remember to enjoy the small victories of finally getting a code to run or finding time on the SEM to analyse your samples. At conferences, enjoy being surrounding scientists that are just starting out and the seasoned professionals with a back catalogue of interesting stories. And if you’re lucky enough to be at a conference somewhere sunny, make sure to get outside during the breaks and free time to soak up some vitamin D!

The Shanghai skyline after the Sino-UK Deep Volatiles Annual Meeting at Nanjing University.

Get conference ready!

Get conference ready!

It’s almost time for the AGU fall meeting 2018! Are you ready? Have you prepared your schedule and set up all your important business meetings? Here are some final tips to nail your presentation and/or poster!

Nailing your presentation
The art of the 15-minute talk: how to design the best 15-minute talk
Presentation skills – 1. Voice: how to get the most out of your presentation voice
Presentation skills – 2. Speech: how to stop staying ‘uh’

Making the best poster
Poster presentation tips: how to design the best poster layout
The rainbow colour map (repeatedly) considered harmful: how to make the best scientific figures

Presentation skills – 2. Speech

Presentation skills – 2. Speech

Presenting: some people love it, some people hate it. I firmly place myself in the first category and apparently, this presentation joy translates itself into being a good – and confident – speaker. Over the years, quite a few people have asked me for my secrets to presenting (which – immediate full disclosure – I do not have) and this is the result: a running series on the EGU GD Blog that covers my own personal tips and experience in the hope that it will help someone (you?) become a better and – more importantly – more confident speaker. Last time, we discussed your presentation voice. In this second instalment, I discuss everything related to how you speak.

1. Get rid of ‘uh’

Counting the number of times a speaker says ‘uh’ during a presentation is a fun game, but ideally you would like your audience to focus on the non-uh segments of your talk. Therefore, getting rid of ‘uh’ (or any other filler word for that matter) is important. I have two main tips to get rid of ‘uh’:

Write down your speech and practice (but don’t hold on to it religiously)

Practice. Practice. And practice it again. Maybe a few more times. Almost… no: practice it again.
I am being serious here. If you know exactly what you want to say, you won’t hesitate and fill that moment of hesitation with a prolonged uuuuuhhh. The added benefit of writing down your presentation and practising it religiously is that it will help you with timing your presentation as well. I also find it helpful to read through it (instead of practising it out loud) when I am in a situation that doesn’t allow me to go into full presentation mode (on the plane to AGU for example). However, make sure to practise your presentation out loud even though you wrote it all down: thinking speed (or reading in your head) and talking speed are not the same!

If you write down your presentation, and you know exactly what you want to say, you have to take care to evade another (new) pitfall for saying ‘uh’: now that you know exactly what you want to say and how to say it most efficiently, you start saying ‘uh’ when you can’t remember the exact wording. Let it go. Writing down your speech helps you to clarify the vocabulary needed for your speech, but if you don’t say the exact sentences, just go with something else. You will have a well thought out speech anyway. Just go with the flow and try not to say ‘uh’.

The second main tip for getting rid of ‘uh’ is to

Realise that it is okay to stay silent for a while

If you forget the word you wanted to say and you need some time to think, you can take a break. You can stay silent. You don’t need to fill up the silence with ‘uh’. In fact, a break often seems more natural. Realise that you forgot something, don’t panic, take a breath, take a break (don’t eat a KitKat at this point in your presentation), and then continue when you know what to say again. Even if you don’t forget the exact words or phrasings, taking a breath and pausing in your narrative can be helpful for your audience to take a breath as well. It will seem as if your presentation is relaxed: you are not rushing through 50 slides in 12 minutes. You are prepared, you are in control, you can even take a break to take a breath.

2. Speed

A lot of (conference) presentations will have a fixed time. At the big conferences, like EGU and AGU, you get 12 minutes and not a second more or less. Well, of course you can talk longer than 12 minutes, but this will result in less (if any) time for questions.

I don’t think the conveners will kill you, but don’t pin me down on it

And on top of that, everyone (well, me at the very least) will be annoyed at you for not sticking to the time.

So: sticking to your time limit is important!

But how can you actually do this? Well, there are a few important factors:
1. Preparation: know exactly what you want to say (we will cover this more in a later instalment of this series)
2. The speed at which you speak.

We will be discussing the latter point in this blog entry. For me (and many other people), I know I can stick to the rule of “one slide per minute”, but I always have a little buffer in that I count the title slide as a slide as well. So, my 12-minute long presentation would have 12 slides in total (including the title slides). This actually spreads my 12 minutes over 11 scientific slides, so I can talk a little bit longer about each slide. It also gives me piece of mind to know that I have a bit of extra time. However, the speed at which you talk might be completely different. Therefore, the most important rule about timing your presentations is:

Knowing how fast you (will) speak

I always practice my short presentations a lot. If they are 30 minutes or longer, I like to freewheel with the one slide per minute rule. But for shorter presentations, I require a lot of practice. I always time every presentation attempt and make a point of finishing each attempt (even if the first part goes badly). Otherwise you run the risk of rehearsing the first part of your presentation very well, and kind of forgetting about the second part. When I time my presentation during practice, I always speak too long. For a 12 minute presentation, I usually end up at the 13.5 minute mark. However, I know that when I speak in front of an audience, I (subconsciously?) speed up my speech, so when I time 13.5 minutes, I know that my actual presentation will be a perfect 12 minutes.

The only way to figure out how you change or start to behave in front of an audience is by simply giving a lot of presentations. Try to do that and figure out whether you increase or decrease the speed of your speech during your talk. Take note and remember it for the next time you time your presentation. In the end, presenting with skill and confidence is all about knowing yourself.

3. Articulation and accent

There are as many accents to be heard at a conference as there are scientists talking. Everyone has there own accent, articulation, (presentation) voice, etc. This means that

You should not feel self-conscious about your accent

Some accents are stronger than others and may be more difficult for others to follow. Native speakers are by no means necessarily better speakers and depending on whom you ask, their accent might also not be better than anyone else’s.
Of course your accent might become an issue if people can’t understand you. You can try and consider the following things to make yourself understandable for a big audience:
1. Articulate well.
2. Adapt the speed at which you talk

Some languages are apparently faster than others. French is quite fast for example, whereas (British) English is a slower language. You have to take this into account when switching languages. If you match the pace of the language you are speaking, your accent will be less noticeable, because you avoid any ingrained rythm patterns that are language specific. Then you might still have your accent shine through in your pronunciation of the words, but it will not shine through in the rhythm of your speech.
In addition, you can consider asking a native speaker for help if you are unsure of how to pronounce certain words. Listening or watching many English/American/Australian tv series/films/youtube will also help with your pronunciation.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is about everything I have to say on the matter of speech. You should now have full control over your presentation voice and all the actual words you are going to say. Next time, we go one step further and discuss your posture during the presentation and your movements.