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Geodynamics

EGU conference series

GD Guide to EGU19

GD Guide to EGU19

With this year’s EGU General Assembly (GA; #EGU19) looming in less than a week, it’s time for all attendees to finish (or start) their own scientific contributions, create their own personal programs as well as plan other activities during the conference. In this blog Nico Schliffke (GD ECS Rep) would like to share some useful advice how to successfully navigate through the conference and highlight relevant activities, both scientific and social, for Geodynamics Early Career Scientists (ECS).

The huge variety of scientific contributions (~18,000 at EGU18) might seem intimidating to begin with and makes it impossible for any individual to keep track of everything. To be well prepared for the conference, allow for a bit of time to create your own personal programme by logging in with your account details and search for relevant sessions, keywords, authors, friends or any other fields of interest. If you have found anything interesting, add it to your personal programme by ticking the ‘star’. After completing your personal programme you can print your own timetable or open it in the EGU 2019 app.

Besides all the (specific) scientific content of the GA, EGU19 offers a wide spread of exciting workshops and short courses to boost your personal and career skills, as well great debates, union wide events and division social events. Below you will find a list of highlight events, special ECS targeted events, social events and other things to keep in mind and to make the best of EGU19:

For first time attendees:

How to navigate the EGU: tips and tricks (Mon, 08:30 – 10:15, Room -2.16) – This workshop is led by several EGU ECS representatives and will give an overview of procedures during EGU as well as useful tips and tricks how to successfully navigate the GA.

GD workshops and short courses:

Geodynamics 101A: Numerical methods (Thur, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.62) Building on last year’s short course, we are happy to announce two short courses this year as a part of the ’Solid Earth 101’ series together with Seismology 101 and Geology 101. The first course deals with the basic concepts of numerical modelling, including discretisation of governing equations, building models, benchmarking (among others).

Geodynamics 101B: Large-scale dynamical processes (Fri, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.62)  The second short course will discuss the applications of geodynamical modelling. It will cover a state-of-art overview of main large-scale dynamics on Earth (mantle convection, continental breakup, subduction dynamics, crustal deformation..) but also discuss constraints coming from seismology (tomography) or the geological record.

Geology 101: The (hi)story of rocks (Tue, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.62)The complementary workshop in the 101 series: Find more about structural and petrological processes on Earth. It’s definitely worth knowing, otherwise why should we be doing many of these Geodynamical models?

Seismology 101 (Wed, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.62)The second complementary workshop in the 101 series. Many geodynamical models are based on observations using seismological methods. Find out more about earthquakes, beachballs and what semiologists are actually measuring – this is essential for any numerical or analogue geodynamical model!

GD related award ceremonies and lectures:

Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECS Lecture by Mathew Domeier (Tue, 12:00-12:30 Room -2.21) – The Arne Richter award is an union-wide award for young scientists. We are happy to see that Mathew as a Geodynamicist has won the medal this year! Come along and listen to his current research.

Augustus Love Medal Lecture by Anne Davaille (Thur, 14:45-15:45, Room D1) – Listen to the exciting work of the first female winner of the Augustus Love Medal (the GD division award), Anne Davaille! She is specialised on experimental and analytical fluid dynamics which has given Geodynamics many new insights.

 Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture by Jean Braun  (Tue, 12:45-13:45, Room E1) – This one of the most prestigious EGU award for solid Earth geosciences. Jean is a geodynamicist from Potsdam and works on integrating surface and lithospheric dynamics into numerical models.

 

 

GD division social activities:

ECS GD informal lunch  (Mon, 12:30-14:00) – Come and meet the ECS team behind these GD activities! Meet in front of the conference center (look for “GD” stickers), to head to the food court in Kagran (2 subway stops away from the conference center, opposite direction to city centre).

ECS GD dinner (Wed, 19:30-22:00) – Join us for a friendly dinner at a traditional Viennese ‘Heurigen’ with fellow ECS Geodynamicists at Gigerl – Rauhensteingasse 3, Wien 1. Bezirk!  If you would like to attend the ECS GD dinner on Wednesday, please fill out this form to keep track on the number of people: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScpi8gvDDMOOOjLbtq4BrElsoBtTv86Mud7qNQ5yl7qWP5cUA/viewform  Remember to bring some cash to pay for your own food and drinks!

GD/TS/SM drinks (Wed, after ECS GD dinner) – Don’t worry if you cannot make for the ECS GD dinner! After dinner we’ll have a 5 min walk to Bermuda Bräu – Rabensteig 6, 1010 Wien for some drinks together with ECS from Seismology (SM) and Tectonics/Structural (TS), so you can meet us there too!  

GD Division meeting (Fri, 12:45-13:45 Room D2) – Elections and reports from the division president, ECS representative and other planning in GD related matters. Lunch provided!

Meet the division president of Geodynamics (Paul Tackley) and the ECS representative (Nico Schliffke) (Wed, 11:45-12:30, EGU Booth) – Come and discuss with the president and ECS rep about any GD related issues, suggestions or remarks.

Geodynamicists eating lunch at Kagran – it’s tradition by now.

EGU wide social activities:

Networking and ECS Zone (all week – red area)This area is dedicated to early career scientist all week and provides space to chillout, get your well deserved coffee or find out more about ECS related announcements.

Opening reception (Sun, 18:30 – 21:00, Foyer F) – Don’t miss out on many new faces and friends, as well as free food and drinks and the opening (ice-breaker) reception! There will also be a ECS corner to meet fellow young scientists, especially if it’s your first EGU.

EGU Award Ceremony (Wed, 17:30 – 20:00, Room E1) – All EGU medallists will receive their award at this ceremony.

ECS Forum (Wed, 12:45 – 13:45, Room L2)An open discussion on any ECS topic

ECS Networking and Careers Reception (by invitation only) (Tue, 19:00-20:30, Room F2)

Conveners’ reception (by invitation only) (Fri 19:30 – 0:00, Foyer F) 

Credit: Kai Boggild (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Great debates

Science in policymaking: Who is responsible?  (Mon, 10:45 – 12:30, Room E1) – Actively take part in one of the presently most important and hot topic!

How can Early Career Scientists prioritise their mental wellbeing? (Tue, 19:00 – 20:30, Room E1) – Many ECS find it challenging to prioritise their mental wellbeing. Discuss with many other young scientist how to tackle this really important issue and maybe learn helpful tips how to improve your own wellbeing! 

Other useful skills to polish your career/CV:

Help! I’m presenting at a scientific conference (Mon, 14:00 –15:45, Room -2.62) – Your first conference talk might be daunting. Find out best practices and tips how to create a concise and clear conference talk.

How to share your research with citizens and why it’s so important (Mon, 14:00-15:45, Room -2.16) – Do you share your research with the public? Can you explain in simple matters? An important topic for researchers currently!

How to make the most of your PhD or postdoc experience for getting your next job in academia (Tue, 16:15 – 18:00, Room -2.85) – It’s never too early to plan your next career step.

How to convene and chair a session at the General Assembly (Tue, 08:30-10:15, Room -2.85) – Find out what it needs to convene a session of short course at EGU. You may be surprised, but you could to it next year if you liked,

How to peer-review? (Mon, 16:15 -18:00, Room -2.85) – After the end of a PhD (or sometimes even earlier!) you may be asked to peer-review journal contributions, but hardly anyone knows the process beforehand.

How to find funding and write a research grant (Tue, 10:45-12:30, Room -2.16) – One of the major tasks when you finish your PhDs. It might even be useful when writing applications for travel support etc.

Funding opportunities: ERC grants (Tue, 12:45-13:45, Room 0.14) – Find out more about these generous grants and how to successfully apply for them

How to apply for the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grants (Wed, 12:45-13:45, Room 0.14)

Balancing work and personal life as a scientist (Wed, 16:15 – 18:00, Room -2.85) – Find out how not to lose sight of your hobbies and personal life in a increasingly competitive academic environment. 

Other interesting events:

Academia is not the only route (Thu, 10:45-12:30, Room -2.16) – Are you finishing your degree and not overly excited by an academic future? Try this short course on exploring career alternatives both inside and outside academia

Games for Geoscience (Wed, 16:15-18:00 (Talks) in Room L8 and 14:00-15:45 (Posters), Hall X4) – Games are more fun than work! Learn more on how to use games for communication, outreach and much more. 

Unconscious bias (Wed, 12:45-13:45, Room -2.32) – Become aware of the obstacles that some of your colleagues face every day, and that might prevent them from doing the best science

Promoting and supporting equality of opportunities in geosciences (Thu, 14:00-18:00, Room E1) – Any of us should promote an open, equal opportunity working environment and this session promises some very interesting talk on common issues, solutions and initiatives.

What I’ve learned from teaching geosciences in prisons – (Thu, 14:00-15:45, Hall X4 – Poster) by GD ECS Phil Heron.

Rhyme Your Research (Tue, 14:00 – 15:45, Room -2.16) – Reveal the poet in you and explain your research in an interesting and unusual way!

This is just a small list of possible activities during EGU19, and I’m sure to have missed out many more. So keep your eyes and ears open for additional events and spread the word if you know anything of particular interest. Also make sure you follow the GD Blog, our social media (EGU GD Facebook page) and EGU Twitter, to keep updated with any more information during the week! The official hashtag is #EGU19. All the best for EGU and I am looking forward to meeting many of you there!

 

Meeting, mentoring and awards at EGU18

Meeting, mentoring and awards at EGU18

Having just about recovered from the session-packed, networking-fest, coffee-filled, schnitzel-test that was EGU2018 (8-13th April, Vienna), it is now possible to reflect and look towards upcoming dates. Earlier posts in the blog have described some of the GD side event highlights. For this week’s post, I have summarised some key points from the GD Division meeting, the EGU Mentoring program, and the upcoming EGU award nominations.

Geodynamics (GD) Division Meeting

During the Friday lunchtime break GD President Paul Tackley (ETH Zürich) led the session about GD activities and statistics to an eager audience of around 50 attendees. Within the 19 GD-led sessions for EGU2018 there were 481 abstracts (adding co-organized sessions raised this to ~1450 abstracts). As in previous years, the structure of EGU, and meeting fun facts were delivered – this year there were over 15.000 attendees, 17.000 abstracts in the programme, 666 unique sessions and 68 short courses. New to this year’s conference, there was a Cartoonist and Poet-in-residence, re-usable water bottles, and CO2 emission offset initiative.

A portion of the lunchtime meeting was dedicated to discussing the time and space constraints associated with increasing attendance and presentations at the GA. Many rooms are already overcrowded and maximum poster capacity is expected to be reached within the next 2 years (this year 8% of GA presentations were PICOs, 64% posters and 28% orals). As extra space in the Austria Centre Vienna is not a possibility, several ideas were put forward by EGU including increasing the GA from 5 to 6 days, limiting to 1 abstract per person (2 if invited), increasing oral times from 6-8 hours per day, holding different posters in morning and afternoon, and shorter talks (12 minutes). Several audience members expressed opinions regarding the proposed changes, and the audience seemed in favour of more overall oral time-slots but not shorter talks, or moving to a 6 day conference. We shall see what is implemented but there are at least new set of rules for 2019:

Apart from the consumption of free sandwiches, audience arms were put to use when voting for Division Officers (van Hunen, Artemieva, Biggin, Bunge, Karato) and the Medal Committee (Houseman, Parmentier, Parsons, Phipps Morgan) – all approved.

For the GD ECS specifics, we will welcome the new GD Early Career Scientist (ECS) Representative Nicholas Schliffke (U. Durham), as Adina Pusok (UC San Diego) steps into a co-representative position for the next year. Our blog activities over the last year were also presented by our enthusiastic Editor-In-Chief Iris van Zelst (ETH, Zürich). As always, we encourage more ECR members to get in touch with us to be a guest writer.

Some important EGU2019 dates for your calendar:

25 June-13 September 2018
Public call-for-sessions
(the rolling over of sessions will not occur – join forces with your colleagues!)

15 October 2018 – 10 Jan 2019
Abstract submission

7-12 April 2019
EGU2019, Vienna

EGU GD Awards

The Meeting also highlighted the Division’s 2018 award recipients, Edgar Marc Parmentier and Thibault Duretz, which we here congratulate again:

The GD Outstanding Poster/PICO (OSPP) for 2017 was awarded to Ludovic Räss for his poster “M2Di: MATLAB 2D Stokes solvers using the finite difference method.”

In particular, please note the upcoming deadline for award nominations for 2019 on the 15th June.
We encourage you to put forward your colleagues for nominations for both categories! You can read more about the awards and nomination process here.

And with only a single female winner of the GD Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award (<7 years from highest degree; no age limitation), and none for the Augustus Love Medal, I am sure you do not have to look far for worthy candidate(s) to help improve the gender balance of these awards.

Mentoring program – we need you!

In its second year running, EGU organized a mentoring program during the conference. This year the program received double the number of registrations from 2017. The aim is to connect mentors – those who are EGU veterans in terms of multiple attendances – with mentees, prioritized to early-career participants (Masters and PhDs) who are first-time attendees. Matching was primarily based on division affiliations or research keywords, but as there are 22 divisions and over 50 identified research interests, interdisciplinary matches were commonplace.

This year from GD specifically there were 3 mentors and 2 mentees signing up – as EGU Media and Communications Officer Barbara Ferreira said “a rare (and positive) case of more mentors than mentees registering for the programme”. These 3 mentors were eventually matched with 6 mentees. However, across the board around 75 mentees had to be rejected because of insufficient mentors available.

So, if you have attended numerous EGU GAs and know the lay of the land, please do sign up next year! I can highly recommend being a mentor; to sit down for a coffee and a chat is really not taxing and is a good opportunity to meet new faces in your division and from further afield.

 

Tschüss – see you in Vienna next year.

Editorial thanks to GD President Paul Tackley and EGU Media and Communications Officer Bárbara Ferreira (@dinnerpartysci) for summary slides for the GD Meeting and Mentoring programs, respectively. Cheers again to the EGU organizers for a fantastic meeting.

Making the most of the EGU General Assembly 2018 as a Geodynamicist and Early Career Scientist

Making the most of the EGU General Assembly 2018 as a Geodynamicist and Early Career Scientist

Are you still deciding on how to best fill your EGU General Assembly program next week in Vienna? Wondering what is on offer specifically for the Geodynamics (GD) early career community? Our EGU GD Early Career Scientist representative, Adina Pusok (Scripps, UC San Diego), shares some planning tips and event highlights for the big week ahead. We are looking forward to seeing you there!

The EGU General Assembly 2018 (popularly known as EGU2018, or the official hashtag of #EGU18) in Vienna is about to kick off this coming Sunday, and I am sure many geoscientists worldwide are making the last preparations, or even getting the last results in (good luck!). Hopefully, some of you have already had a chance to look on the EGU2018 meeting organizer available (also with a great mobile app) and “star” some of your favourite sessions and events in your personal programme. And probably soon enough, you have also realized that it is not humanly possible to attend everything that you find interesting (unless you are in possession of a time machine to be in multiple places at the same time).

A meeting the size of EGU2018 can be intimidating to most attendees, especially first timers, and being selective becomes a valuable skill. It is a place where you can check out the latest research across a wide range of fields within the geosciences, and within your own area of science. And of course, it is a place to catch up or make new friends and collaborations from all over the world.

Assuming that you’ve already marked in your personal programme your own presentation(s) and scientific sessions of interest, I want to draw your attention to the other side of the conference. The EGU2018 is not just a conference where the latest science is reported, but also one of the best places where you can develop your personal and career skills in a short amount of time. As I’ve written before, Early Career Scientists (ECS) have different needs compared to established scientists. And for that, the EGU2018 schedule comes with a wide range of sessions, short courses, great debates, union wide events, and division social events that complement the scientific agenda of the meeting.

I write this blog post primarily for Geodynamics ECS and first time attendees at the EGU2018 to help them navigate through this “hidden” schedule and make the most out of EGU2018. As an ECS myself, I’ve always liked to explore what every meeting has to offer, and try to learn some new things. So, here are some of my tips and highlights for this year’s EGU2018 meeting schedule:

  1. Short courses – learn a new skill or two in no time

    Learn a scientific skill:
  • Geodynamics 101 (Figure 1) – First short course on numerical geodynamics at the EGU General Assembly! So it’s a must whether you are a geodynamicist, or you just want to understand why all those pretty pictures also make sense scientifically (Wed, afternoon)
  • GPlates – Try this hands-on tutorial with a popular open-source software for plate tectonic reconstructions (Thu, morning) 
  • Seismology for non-seismologists – Learning how to correctly interpret seismic data is an important skill for every solid-earth geodynamicist (Mon, afternoon)

For first time attendees:

  • How to navigate EGU: tips and tricks – Dedicated to first time attendees! If you fit the bill, make sure you wake up early on Monday morning for this introductory short course (Mon, morning) 

Learn to polish these professional skills:

  • Academic presentations – Having last minute nerves about your presentation? Get some tips and tricks to ace that talk! (Mon, afternoon)
  • How to convene a session at EGU’s General Assembly – Convening a session is regarded as an important duty in the scientific community that also gets you a free ticket to the conveners’ party on the Friday evening (Tue, afternoon)
  • How do you peer-review? – Something that nobody during your graduate studies will actually tell you, but you’re expected to know how to do.
  • Applying for Marie Sklodowska-Curie grants – Info session on the highly competitive individual fellowships that are definitely worth applying for, and are aimed at Early Career Scientists (Wed, lunch) 
  • ERC grants – More funding opportunities from the European Research Council (ERC) at all career levels (Thu, evening) 

Explore outside your bubble:

  • Academia is not the only route – Are you finishing your degree and not overly excited by an academic future? Try this short course on exploring career alternatives both inside and outside academia (Thu, afternoon) 
  • Unconscious bias – Become aware of the obstacles that some of your colleagues face every day, and that might prevent them from doing the best science (Tue, morning)

Learn how new technology can help your research:

  • Writing reproducible science – You know you’ve complained at least once that it’s difficult to reproduce the results of a certain paper. Now you can learn ways to improve the conduction and dissemination of your work! (Thu, afternoon)
  • Learning git – This is a life-saver skill that every scientist should have! No more n-versions of your theses, manuscripts or projects (Wed, morning)

Fun skills:

  1. Great debates – teams argue opposite views on a particular topic. Let’s see some science-worthy arguments there!

Don’t worry if you cannot (really) make it to the great debates. You can follow and join in the debates using the web-streaming service.

  1. Awards events – Come and celebrate the work of distinguished scientists! Tip: Medal lectures are particularly interesting across all geosciences fields! This year’s medal lectures specific to the GD division are:
  1. More events and sessions dedicated to professional and career development:
  • EarthArXiv – A general introduction to preprints and the new pre-print server for Earth Sciences, a concept that has been very successful across science disciplines (Mon, evening)
  • Industry career opportunities for early career scientists – The title is clear enough of what you can expect here: how to transition from academia to industry (Mon, evening) 
  • Promoting and supporting equality of opportunities in geosciences – If you care to promote an open, equal opportunities working environment (and you should!), this session promises some very interesting talks and posters on some common issues, solutions and initiatives (posters – Tue, morning, orals – Wed, afternoon) 
  • Meet the chief executive editor of Solid Earth – Thinking of submitting your next manuscript to an EGU journal, such as the Solid Earth? Learn tips and how the publishing process works by meeting the editor–in-chief of the journal (Mon, afternoon)
  • Games for Geoscience – Because it’s always more fun to work and play (orals and posters – Wed, afternoon) 
  1. Other ECS events – Get active and involved into the EGU ECS community with these events:
  • Meet the EGU ECS Representatives and EGU Communications Officer (Roelof Rietbroek, Stephanie Zihms, and Olivia Trani) – These are the people representing ECS at the union level and will be happy to chat with you about your EGU experience, or future plans for the ECS community! (Wed, afternoon)
  • EGU ECS Forum – Open-discussion session for all ECS. Lunch provided! (Thu, lunch)
  • Imaggeo photo competition – Announcing the winners of the photo competition. High-quality photos guaranteed! (Fri, lunch)
  1. Union wide events – Great events to network with medalists or other scientists over some food and drinks! Do not miss them!
  • Opening reception – Sun, 18:30–21:00
  • EGU Award Ceremony – Wed, 17:30–20:00
  • ECS Networking and Careers Reception – Mon, 19:00–20:30
  1. Geodynamics and ECS events
  • ECS GD informal lunch* – Meet in front of the conference center (look for “GD” stickers), to head to the food court in Kagran (2 subway stops away from the conference center). Looking forward to meeting many ECS and come up with more exciting projects for GD! (Note: this blog started taking shape at the ECS GD lunch last year) (Tue, 12:00-13:30)
  • ECS GD dinner* – Join us for a friendly dinner with fellow ECS Geodynamicists at Wieden Bräu – Waaggasse 5, 1040 Wien! (Wed, 19:30-22:00) If you would like to attend the ECS GD dinner on Wednesday, please fill out this form to keep track on the number of people: https://goo.gl/forms/v42iDyGHB0MvoBz13
  • GD/TS drinks* – No worries if you cannot make for the ECS GD dinner! We will continue with joint TS/GD drinks in Bermuda Bräu – Rabensteig 6, 1010 Wien! (Wed, after ECS GD dinner)
  • GD Division meeting – The division president, Paul Tackley, will show the latest updates regarding the GD division and will present the OSPP award winner from last year. Lunch provided! (Fri, lunch)

*All events are organized by the EGU GD ECS representative, and are open to GD division members and friends.

Just by writing this post, I’ve realized how many interesting events are going to happen next week! Hope you will be creative with your conference schedule and try some of these “hidden” events! Make sure you follow the EGU Blogs and social media, and the division specific events so that you make the most of your attendance at EGU General Assembly 2018. For GD division related news stay tuned for important updates on the EGU GD Facebook page and blog in the coming days. I wish you a great and productive EGU2018 week!

Poster presentation tips

Poster presentation tips

Being a scientist is more than just doing research and science. You also need to be able to communicate your findings to your peers and/or the general public (outreach). At conferences, you usually have two options for presenting your work: a talk or a poster (although at EGU, you also have the PICO sessions). A poster is often preferred if you would like to start a discussion and get lots of feedback on your work. So how do you ensure that people will come to your poster, stay to read it, and take the most important messages home? Charitra Jain, PhD student at ETH Zurich, Switzerland and winner of the Outstanding Student Poster Award at NetherMod 2017, gives some tips.

Charitra Jain

Some things I consider important while making posters:
• Break down the text in concise bullet points
• Use a non-white background to make your poster stand out among hundreds of posters
• Find the right balance between text and figures (depending on if you are planning to stay at your poster)
• Make sure your poster is easy to navigate
• Highlight the keywords
• Use 2-3 font sizes to represent hierarchy
• Think about “breathability”: don’t overcrowd your poster
• Demarcate different sections clearly
• Use perpetually-uniform color scales (also see this post by Fabio Crameri. I am trying to integrate these colour scales in my future plots/figures)
• Zoom 100% in on your poster on your screen and try to read it from 2 meters away to get an impression of what the poster will look like eventually

Besides tips from Charitra Jain, it is also useful to know what the jury deems important in a poster. Therefore, the list of criteria that Susanne Buiter presented at the Outstanding Student Poster Award Ceremony at NetherMod 2017 is reproduced here:

Poster design
• Clarity
• Aim and motivation
• Key findings
• Large figures
• Readable text
• More figures than text

Presentation and knowledge of the subject
• The story
• Figures supportive of the story
• Discussion/ability to answers questions

Charitra Jain’s winning poster at NetherMod 2017 on the generation of primordial continental crust (click to enlarge)