GD
Geodynamics

edited by Lucía Pérez-Díaz

Lucía is a technical specialist in geodynamics at Halliburton, UK, and an associate researcher at the University of Oxford. Her current research revolves around understanding the feedbacks between mantle activity, plate-scale processes and surface observations and developing improved quantitative plate modelling techniques. She is part of the GD blog team as editor. Lucía tweets under @DrPerezDiaz.

Carbon in the cloud

Carbon in the cloud

If I asked you about what your carbon footprint is, your mind might jump to the food choices you make when at the supermarket, or how many conferences you fly to when you could get a train (well, not now, but you know, back in ye olden days). In this week’s post, Eoghan Totten, a PhD student at the University of Oxford, discusses the potential “hidden” impacts on your contributio ...[Read More]

Thinking inside the (sand)box

Thinking inside the (sand)box

Ahhh analogue models… Those beautiful little (or not so little) worlds inside a box, captivatingly beautiful, impossibly detailed… (sorry, getting carried away, am I?). This week, Alex Hughes gives us the insider’s report on what actually goes on in analogue modelling labs when the “Experiment running, do not disturb!!” sign is on the door. Analogue models have been a ...[Read More]

What can we learn from geodynamic failure?

Artwork reading

In this week’s post, Mohamed Gouiza discusses the challenges of living under constant stress, paralysed by the possibility of failure and self-perceived inevitability of impending breakup. Continental rifting, of course! Oh… did you think I was talking about life as a researcher? Under tensile stress, the lithosphere stretches, the asthenosphere rises, the crust fails, and rifts form. During this ...[Read More]