HS
Hydrological Sciences

Featured Catchment

Featured catchment series: The Rio Vauz catchment – long-term hydrologic observations in the Dolomites

Featured catchment series: The Rio Vauz catchment – long-term hydrologic observations in the Dolomites

Dolomitic landscapes are characterized by vertical rock cliffs and soil-mantled hillslopes originated from glacial or colluvial deposits, which hide a complex subsurface aquifer due to the permeability of the dolomitic rocks. To improve the understanding of the hydrological functioning of such complex hydrogeological systems, the hydrology group of the Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture ...[Read More]

Featured catchment series: Disentangling the ecohydrology of a tropical hotspot!

Featured catchment series: Disentangling the ecohydrology of a tropical hotspot!

Zhurucay Ecohydrological Observatory: Critical zone observations at the top of the Andes! A natural laboratory of tropical alpine ecohydrology Tropical alpine ecosystems, known as the Páramo, extend to high elevations (3,000-5,000 m a.s.l.) mainly through the northern Andes of South America from Venezuela to northern Peru. Given their geographical location and elevation, Páramo areas are exposed t ...[Read More]

Featured catchment series: The North is not forgotten!

Featured catchment series: The North is not forgotten!

This is the first post of “Featured Catchment”, a series of posts in the HS Blog that present experimental catchments across Europe and beyond. Here, the authors of the posts will explain the main characteristics (e.g., climate, geology, topography, land use) of their catchments, why hydrologic research is important in their study areas, describe the applied methodologies (field instrumentation an ...[Read More]