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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Featured Catchment: The Weierbach – Yet another temperate forested headwater?

Featured Catchment: The Weierbach – Yet another temperate forested headwater?

Slate bedrock, an often overlooked system At first sight, the Weierbach catchment may seem unspectacular. It is indeed a small (42 ha) forested headwater catchment, located at mid-latitude in a low mountain range (450-500 m a.s.l.). However, when you take a closer look, and particularly below the surface, the Weierbach is a truly exciting eco-hydrological system. Located in the Luxembourgish Arden ...[Read More]

Amilcare Porporato (2020 John Dalton Medallist) on agile models for complex systems in the environmental sciences

Amilcare Porporato (2020 John Dalton Medallist) on agile models for complex systems in the environmental sciences

The EGU 2020 John Dalton Medal of the EGU Division on Hydrological Sciences was awarded to Amilcare Porporato for his contributions to the field of ecohydrology and for developing new theories for the analysis of soil-plant-atmosphere systems across scales. Given the online EGU 2020 GA, the medal lecture is postponed to 2021. In April, Amilcare wrote the post below to the HS community. I’m very ha ...[Read More]

A university class with a somewhat different approach

A university class with a somewhat different approach

We all know it: the heart of many Master level courses is the term paper, a scientific essay drawn from the students’ work during the semester. It is a way of teaching students not only the content, but also the methodology of scientific work.  And to keep them occupied during the semester break, of course. But last semester one of our courses took a slightly different approach. After writing a pr ...[Read More]

Hydrological tipping points: Can we tip the bucket?

Hydrological tipping points: Can we tip the bucket?

We live in a time of unprecedented pressure on water resources. The combination of drivers, such as human water use and land use, climate change by greenhouse gases and the human modification of other components of the Earth system coupled to the water cycle, may be pushing water resources beyond levels of sustainability at all spatial scales (Gleeson et al., 2020; Zipper et al., 2020). A particul ...[Read More]