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EGU Guest blogger

This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

WomenInHydrology – a new initiative to connect female hydrologists worldwide

WomenInHydrology – a new initiative to connect female hydrologists worldwide

Geographical location of the WomenInHydrology members by their workplace, stand: 31.03.2020 What is WomenInHydrology about? WomenInHydrology is a Google Group mailing list created to encourage and foster the active participation of female hydrologists in the hydrological community. While the information content is not intended to be only women-oriented, the mailing list is dedicated specifically t ...[Read More]

On modelers and modeling

On modelers and modeling

Several studies were conducted and are ongoing where we investigate modelers, modeling decisions and modeling perceptions. Below I discuss the rationale and a summary of the (preliminary) results. Simulation models, conceptualizations of processes into a system of mathematical equations (hereafter simply referred to as models), are frequently used tools in the hydrological sciences. The literature ...[Read More]

Sharing is caring: Models for all, presenting eWaterCycle II

Sharing is caring: Models for all, presenting eWaterCycle II

The photos above were found by doing a google image search for ‘hydrologist’. Apparently our image is that of scientists that get to be outside a lot. We all know that the knowledge we gain from fieldwork gets codified in hydrological models which can be written in all sort of programming languages. “I wonder what this analysis would look like using that other groups hydrological model ...[Read More]

Featured catchment series: The San Carlos Catchment in northeast Costa Rica, a multi-scale hydrological observatory to leapfrog data scarcity in the tropics

Featured catchment series: The San Carlos Catchment in northeast Costa Rica, a multi-scale hydrological observatory to leapfrog data scarcity in the tropics

Tropical ecosystems are of major hydrological importance for regional and global climate systems and are characterized by greater energy inputs, higher rate of change and dynamics compared to other hydroclimatic regions. Nowadays, the anthropogenic influence in the climate crisis exerts enormous pressure on tropical hydrological systems. This growing pressure affects water quality and quantity, wh ...[Read More]