GD
Geodynamics

edited by Giridas Maiti

Giridas Maiti is a postdoctoral researcher at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. He is currently investigating the geodynamic causes for slab breakoff and tearing processes in the Alps and their impacts on the tectonics of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) using 3D numerical modeling. During his Ph.D., he worked on geodynamic modeling of the subduction-collision process in the spatiotemporal evolution of the Himalaya-Tibet mountain system. Giridas is part of the GD blog team as an editor. You can reach Giridas via email (giridas.maiti@kit.edu).

Arc and Intraplate Volcanism in Northeast Asia Since mid-Miocene: Numerical model studies

Arc and Intraplate Volcanism in Northeast Asia Since mid-Miocene: Numerical model studies

Northeast Asia may be one of the best natural laboratories to investigate both arc and intraplate volcanisms which have developed since the mid-Miocene. The arc volcanoes have occurred above the sinking young (Philippine) and old (Pacific) oceanic plates in Southwest and Northeast Japan subduction zones, respectively. The intraplate volcanoes across the Korean Peninsula and China have occurred abo ...[Read More]

Effects of decelerating India-Eurasia convergence on the crustal flow and topographic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau

Effects of decelerating India-Eurasia convergence on the crustal flow and topographic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau

The Tibetan Plateau is the most extensive elevated surface on the Earth, stretching ~1,000 km north to south and 3,200 km east to west, with a mean elevation of greater than 4.5 km and located north of the Indian subcontinent. The formation of this Plateau has profoundly influenced the variations and evolution of Asian climate, strengthening of the South-Asian Monsoon, development of the large Asi ...[Read More]