NP
Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences
Davide Faranda

Davide Faranda

I’m researcher in physics at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). My main interests are devoted to the construction of a statistical mechanical and dynamical systems framework for the study of atmospheric motions. In particular, my works aim at the characterization of the metastable states of the atmospheric circulation with simple mathematical and statistical tools, and the characterization of rare atmospheric events, such as storms, heatwaves and cold spells. In my research, I collaborate both with mathematicians and physicists working on the characterization of highly turbulent flows, adapting the techniques used in that field to climate science.

Four reasons for still observing cold spells despite the undeniable global climate change

Four reasons for still observing cold spells despite the undeniable global climate change

The winter of 2020-2021 has been characterized by various cold waves affecting – at different times – Western and Eastern Europe and North America.  The most striking pictures show Madrid covered by up to 40 cm of fresh snow, frozen Thames near London and Canal St Martin in Paris, heavy snow in Amsterdam and even on the Eolian Islands, just offshore Sicily. At first this seems contradi ...[Read More]

The never-ending 2020 hurricane season

The never-ending 2020 hurricane season

Iota, this is the name of the last category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean. Iota is a non-name because normally hurricanes are named by NOAA starting from A to Z but when the alphabet is over, they are just identified from a letter of the Greek alphabet. Iota is a special cyclone not just because its name implies that the hurricane season is particularly rich in storms but also because of its e ...[Read More]

Can we connect the exceptional floods in France and Italy associated with the storm Alex to climate change?

The first days of October were marked by an extreme weather event: storm Alex, a cyclone of Atlantic origin, caused massive showers and thunderstorms over Provence, the Alps, Piedmont and Liguria. In these regions, numerous historical records of precipitation were broken causing the flooding of several streams and rivers in which many people lost their lives. Economic damage was also significant a ...[Read More]

Is climate change making the weather more extreme?

Is climate change making the weather more extreme?

Denver, Sept. 06: it is midday and Jonathan and Maria are sunbathing at City Park. They feel uncomfortable as the temperature has already reached 36°C. While they decide to go back home, their favoured weather app displays an unbelievable snowstorm watch for Tuesday Sept. 08. The forecast turns out to be rather accurate as all Colorado experiences one of the earliest snowstorms on record in Septem ...[Read More]