TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Field Geology

TS Must-Read – Armijo et al. (1986) Quaternary extension in southern Tibet: field observations and tectonic implications

TS Must-Read – Armijo et al. (1986) Quaternary extension in southern Tibet: field observations and tectonic implications

This contribution is a very detailed field report of the Sino-French expedition in eastern Tibet that took place in 1980-1982. Armijo and coauthors accurately analyse the different tectonic styles present in the north and south of the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture Zone, frequently defined as the “chord” joining the eastern and western syntaxes of the Himalayan orogen (Fig. 1). North of the chord, strike-s ...[Read More]

Josefa Cuevas de Sansores (24-02-1920 – 2010) – Mexico’s first woman geological engineer

Josefa Cuevas de Sansores (24-02-1920 – 2010) – Mexico’s first woman geological engineer

Josefa Cuevas Sansores was born on the 24th of March, 1920 to Andrea Aguilar Argüello. Andrea was a professor herself and graduated in 1929 specializing in ‘Instrucción Primaria Inferior y Superior’. She used the knowledge she had gained during her studies to found several kindergartens in Yucatán, one still carrying her name). Josefa had three older sisters, two of which became school teachers, w ...[Read More]

Janet Vida Watson (1 September 1923 – 29 March 1985): The woman who could translate the story of Precambrian rocks into a crystal-clear message

Janet Vida Watson (1 September 1923 – 29 March 1985): The woman who could translate the story of Precambrian rocks into a crystal-clear message

On a late summer day in September 1923, Janet Vida Watson was born. With a father working in palaeontology and a mother who did research in embryology until her marriage, Janet grew up with science all around her. She went to South Hampstead High School, known for its science teaching and continued her education in General Science at Reading University. She graduated in biology and geology in 1943 ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

The San Andreas Fault in California, the Alpine Fault in New Zealand, or the Main Frontal Thrust in the Himalayas are some of the most famous and largest fault zones that accommodate the relative displacement between two adjacent crustal blocks. Such faults, however, represent only the shallower expression of something much bigger: a crustal shear zone. In the first 10 kilometers or so of the crus ...[Read More]

#OnTheRocks – Because Earth is just beautiful!

#OnTheRocks – Because Earth is just beautiful!

From the time the first Kodak camera in 1888 went on sale we can say with confidence a geologist somewhere was trying to capture field photographs. We love to capture the beauty of the field and every geologist has a story to tell. The EGU would like to connect these stories globally in our new #OnTheRocks series. #OnTheRocks will produce a compilation of geological photographs on different scales ...[Read More]

Beyond Tectonics: Fishing for Continents in the Furious Fifties and Roaring Forties

Beyond Tectonics: Fishing for Continents in the Furious Fifties and Roaring Forties

This edition of “Beyond Tectonics” is brought to you by Dr. Derya Gürer and Luca Magri. Derya is a Lecturer in Earth Sciences at The University of Queensland in Brisbane, and Adjunct Lecturer at the University of Tasmania, and Luca is a PhD student at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia. In early 2020, they participated in a research voyage to one of the most remote places on the plane ...[Read More]

Chi Jishang (1917-1994): the diamond hunter who shaped her own future

Chi Jishang (1917-1994): the diamond hunter who shaped her own future

Chi Jishang was born on the 25th of June 1917 in the Anlu County in the Province of Hubei, central China, but she moved to Beijing when she was four years old. Because her family was poor and she had three older siblings, her parents did not allow her and her younger sibling to go to school at the age that they should go to school. As a child, Chi was bright and very curious. She would ask her sch ...[Read More]

The Makran accretionary wedge: an ideal natural laboratory to study accretionary processes.

The Makran accretionary wedge: an ideal natural laboratory to study accretionary processes.

How does an accretionary wedge form? For this edition of Minds over Methods, we have invited Jonas Ruh, lecturer in the Structural Geology and Tectonics group of the Geological Institute at the Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zürich, to tell us about the Makran accretionary wedge, one of the largest on Earth. He explains how the use of field observations and numerical modelling helped him to bet ...[Read More]

Features from the field: Ripple Marks

Features from the field: Ripple Marks

Earlier this year, Ian Kane, geologist at the University of Manchester, captured the iconic snapshot shown above. The picture reveals ripples, developed due to waves and currents in the sand of White Strand (near Killard, county Clare, Ireland) right next to Carboniferous sandstone that contains ‘petrified’ ripple marks! The image is powerful, because it shows the basic principle of geological act ...[Read More]

Features from the field: Foliation

Features from the field: Foliation

Have you ever walked on a mountain trail, passing past outcrops of rocks and noticed that many rocks appear to be split along a well-defined orientation? If you have, you might have seen one of the most important structures in metamorphic rocks – called foliation. The term ‘foliation’ derives from the Latin folium, meaning ‘leaf’. A rock with a foliation looks like a pile of R ...[Read More]