TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Hannah Davies

Hannah Davies is currently a Posdoctoral researcher at GFZ Potsdam, Germany. Her research is focused on modelling million year time scale landscape evolution and its relationship to other components of the Earth system

The ECS TS team, and their activities between GAs

The ECS TS team, and their activities between GAs

As member of the EGU Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) Early Career Scientist (ECS) Representative team, and with the outlook of the first hybrid EGU General Assembly (GA), I take the opportunity to highlight some of the activities and news of the ECS TS team. The ECS TS team has been very active all year round between last year’s #vEGU21 and the upcoming #EGU22 General Assembly. The activitie ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: Dikes and Sills

dyke and sill in Dalradian quartzite

Volcanoes are everywhere along plate margins and on hot spots on the planet’s surface. Just in the past 2 years, we have witnessed enormous explosive eruptions such as that of the Hunga Tonga volcano which released an amount of energy equivalent to hundreds of atomic bombs, and massive lava flows, as at the Cumbre Vieja at La Palma, which was estimated to have a total volume of 80 million cubic me ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: Sheath Folds

Features from the Field: Sheath Folds

Shear zones are areas of intense deformation that localize the movement of one block of the crust with respect to another. In previous posts, we have seen that shear zones contain some very deformed rocks called mylonites, lineations that tell us the direction of movement, and useful kinematic indicators, such as S-C fabrics, that allow geologists to understand which way the rocks moved. However, ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: Stretching Lineations

Features from the Field: Stretching Lineations

Deep beneath our feet, deformation of rocks at high temperature produces impressive structures such as shear zones, that localize the movement of two volumes of rock with respect to one another. Shear zones are strongly deformed bands with strongly foliated structures (i.e., with rocks that look like a pile of leaves) and kinematic indicators, such as S-C fabrics, that tell us geologists which way ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: S-C fabrics

Features from the Field: S-C fabrics

As we have seen in previous Features from the field posts, structural fabrics are both informative and spectacular. But many structural geologists will list a shear zone fabric, such as mylonite, as their favourite! As Samuele, Hannah and I wrote in a previous post, shear zones are regions of intense deformation where rocks have accommodated an extremely high amount of strain and that strain has b ...[Read More]

The ECS TS team, or what happens between GAs

The ECS TS team, or what happens between GAs

As the EGU Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) Early Career Scientist (ECS) Representative, and with the outlook of a second virtual general assembly, I take the opportunity to: (i) provide in two following blogposts, some general guidelines and advice to EGU TS attendees, presenters, and conveners, as recently informed by several blog posts in the EGU-Wide blogs, and (ii) highlight some of the ...[Read More]

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

The San Andreas Fault in California, the Alpine Fault in New Zealand, or the Main Frontal Thrust in the Himalayas are some of the most famous and largest fault zones that accommodate the relative displacement between two adjacent crustal blocks. Such faults, however, represent only the shallower expression of something much bigger: a crustal shear zone. In the first 10 kilometers or so of the crus ...[Read More]

Mind your Head: Taking care of yourself during the Corona-virus crisis – Part 2

Mind your Head: Taking care of yourself during the Corona-virus crisis – Part 2

It has been many months since the first lockdown, in some countries about a year, in other countries perhaps eight months. A continuing learning curve, with many ups and downs. Now the end is slowly appearing on the horizon, with promises of vaccines, and several countries making definite plans on when and how to vaccinate. Still – it will take at least 6 months, quite possibly more, until it is o ...[Read More]

#ShareEGU20: An online EGU General assembly?

#ShareEGU20: An online EGU General assembly?

In mid-March it was decided that the EGU conference in Vienna was to be cancelled, with an alternative proposed, the online GA. Being the first EGU general assembly to be held online, many people are doubtful about many aspects, such as how the conference will be organised and conducted. EGU has been providing answers to questions on their page and on Geolog, and we thought we would provide some h ...[Read More]

Beyond Tectonics: Building fictional worlds to better understand our own

Beyond Tectonics: Building fictional worlds to better understand our own

In this edition of “Beyond Tectonics” Ben Blackledge and Hannah Davies talk about worldbuilding and how it can be applied to the discipline of tectonics and tides. Ben Blackledge recently completed his MSc in Bangor and will soon be beginning a PhD in Bristol University.   Let’s begin with a question. Are the tides always the same on every planet? Because of the force of gravity, ...[Read More]