EGU Blogs

Highlights

GD
Geodynamics

EGU GA 2020 call-for-sessions deadline

EGU GA 2020 call-for-sessions deadline

The deadline for session (and short course!) proposals for EGU 2020 is tomorrow on September 5, 2019! So, if you have a great idea for a session or a short course you still have a little bit of time to write a smashing proposal, find a nice co-convener and submit it to ensure that you will be able to access the convener’s party next year without a fuss. Why not share your knowledge on correct code ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Call for new EGU network blogs!

Call for new EGU network blogs!

Here is your chance to join the EGU blog network! Since 2013, the Union’s network blogs have enjoyed thought-provoking and engaging contributions on a range of topics: from the workings of the inner Earth and palaeontology, through to geomorphology and air quality. The network aims to foster a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: how short-term storms can impact our landscapes

Imaggeo on Mondays: how short-term storms can impact our landscapes

In the Sierra de Aconquija, a mountain range in the southern Central Andes of Argentina, strong storms often come and go at a moment’s notice, but they can have a long-lasting impact on the Earth’s surface. The thunderstorm cell featured in this photo formed in less than half an hour, giving all those nearby only a few minutes to take cover. Mitch D’Arcy, a geomorphologist and postdoctoral researc ...[Read More]

NH
Natural Hazards

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

Where science and communication meet: the editorial world of scientific journals.

The ultimate scope of scientists is to publish their research advancement and share it with the scientific community and civil society. Researchers, whether coming from academia or research institutes, publish their results in peer-reviewed journals, that are usually highly technical and often incomprehensible to anyone except the major experts in the field. In some subjects is inevitable given th ...[Read More]

TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

Features from the field: Foliation

Features from the field: Foliation

Have you ever walked on a mountain trail, passing past outcrops of rocks and noticed that many rocks appear to be split along a well-defined orientation? If you have, you might have seen one of the most important structures in metamorphic rocks – called foliation. The term ‘foliation’ derives from the Latin folium, meaning ‘leaf’. A rock with a foliation looks like a pile of R ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

The Sassy Scientist – Science Sweethearts I

The Sassy Scientist – Science Sweethearts I

Every week, The Sassy Scientist answers a question on geodynamics, related topics, academic life, the universe or anything in between with a healthy dose of sarcasm. Do you have a question for The Sassy Scientist? Submit your question here. Apollo and Artemis ask: What is your opinion on workplace romances? This week’s question just gives me lots of inspiration. This question (in slightly differen ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Conversations on a century of geoscience in Europe: Part 1

Conversations on a century of geoscience in Europe: Part 1

When you think about the last century of geoscience, what comes to mind? Perhaps Alfred Wegener’s theory of continental drift? Or Inge Lehmann’s discovery of Earth’s solid inner core? Over the last 100 years, geoscientists have made incredible contributions to our understanding of the Earth, the solar system, and beyond. The science community has explored uncharted territory, challenged previously ...[Read More]

GD
Geodynamics

Ada Lovelace Workshop 2019

Ada Lovelace Workshop 2019

This week (August 25 to August 30), the Ada Lovelace Workshop on Numerical Modelling and Lithosphere Dynamics takes place at La Certosa di Pontignano near Siena, Italy.  And the workshop started… how should I put it… electrifying. Literally, because the WIFI device got struck by a lightning bolt and therefore there is (at the time of writing) no internet connection. Can you imagine what this ...[Read More]

HS
Hydrological Sciences

All models are wrong but…

All models are wrong but…

“All models are wrong but some are useful” is a quote you probably have heard if you work in the field of computational hydrology – or ‘hydroinformatics’ – the science (or craft?) of building computer models of hydrological systems. The idea is that, even if these models cannot (by definition!) be a 1:1 representation of reality, their erroneous predictions can still be useful to support decision- ...[Read More]