TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology
Anne Pluymakers

Anne Pluymakers

I am an assistent professor in the Rock Mechanics Lab at TU Delft, in the Netherlands. My work-related hobby is figuring out how rocks break, and how fluids affect fracture dynamics. My main rock of interest is limestone at the moment, but I also happily work on related topics, such as what do fractures in natural rocks look like, and imaging projects on fluid flow. I  mostly do laboratory work, and any associated microstructural investigations. But there are also the occasional field excursions, to not lose touch with geology. In the blogteam I am happy to edit blogs, and also to occasionally contribute myself. Outside of work, I love sitting in the sun with a decent cup of coffee and a good book, or to organize dinners for my friends. You can reach me via e-mail.

Mind your head: Overcoming Anxiety

Mind your head: Overcoming Anxiety

This Mind Your Head blog post is a follow-up from Jean Holloway’s talk during the online short course on mental health that aired during the last EGU General Assembly, where she discussed overcoming anxiety. Anxiety is excessive worry or fear, and is a normal part of life, until it becomes frequent or debilitating. This post is written by someone with lived experience as an academic who struggled ...[Read More]

Mind your head: The Imposter Syndrome

Mind your head: The Imposter Syndrome

This Mind Your Head blog post is a follow-up from one of the talks during the online short course on mental health that aired during the last EGU General Assembly. Imposter syndrome is about the feeling of being afraid to be found to be an imposter.  Note that I do not claim to be an expert; in the following, I simply list a few tricks that help me, and people I have talked to, to find their way i ...[Read More]

#ShareEGU20: An online EGU General assembly?

#ShareEGU20: An online EGU General assembly?

In mid-March it was decided that the EGU conference in Vienna was to be cancelled, with an alternative proposed, the online GA. Being the first EGU general assembly to be held online, many people are doubtful about many aspects, such as how the conference will be organised and conducted. EGU has been providing answers to questions on their page and on Geolog, and we thought we would provide some h ...[Read More]

Neutrons and X-rays: 3D and 4D imaging in geoscience

Neutrons and X-rays: 3D and 4D imaging in geoscience

Anne Pluymakers is an assistant professor at TU Delft, whose hobbies include experimental rock mechanics and fluid-rock interaction. She focuses on the effects of fluids on mechanical behaviour of rocks at representative in-situ temperature and pressure conditions, with a strong focus on hydrochemical fluid-rock interaction. Investigating the microstructure of the rock and how it is altered is cri ...[Read More]

Mind your head: Taking care of yourself during the Corona-virus crisis

Mind your head: Taking care of yourself during the Corona-virus crisis

By now more and more countries in Europe are hit by the Corona-virus, leading to increasingly strict measures and closures of many public places. We are being asked or obliged to work from home, to limit social contact by staying away from bars, restaurants, sports clubs, museums, theatres and all other places where gatherings of people take place. Simultaneously, we continue to receive worrying m ...[Read More]

Geothermal Energy and Structural Geology?

Geothermal Energy and Structural Geology?

Fieldwork is a necessity to expand the brain, to kick-start 3D thinking. Field studies with a specific application in mind have – until now – usually been geared towards hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, with the increasing use of the subsurface, for example for CO2 storage and geothermal energy, alternative field studies gain importance. Here, we will focus on geothermal energy, which is in ...[Read More]

The Netherlands: In search of the oldest rocks of a muddy country

The Netherlands: In search of the oldest rocks of a muddy country

Technically speaking, the Netherlands isn’t really a city, even though it is the most densely populated country in the European Union and one of the most densely populated countries in the world, with 488 people/km­2. It is a delta, and for many people geology is not the first thing that springs to mind when thinking about the flat countryside. Large parts of the country have been more often below ...[Read More]