BG
Biogeosciences

Biogeosciences

Keeping a lookout at the edge of the world

Keeping a lookout at the edge of the world

  Few places in the world conjure up images of remoteness and harshness like Far Eastern Siberia. Yet, it’s places like these where our science is needed most. Arctic soils hold vast amount of carbon, protected in thick layers of permafrost, but these stores are becoming more and more vulnerable as temperatures in the Arctic warm, and are set to warm faster than anywhere else on the planet. R ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–Urban bees found to feed on flowers

Coffee break biogeosciences–Urban bees found to feed on flowers

Honey bees, a highly important pollinator, have suffered a number of declines and population collapses in recent years. The growth of urban centers has contributed to a loss of foraging habitat and an introduction of new food sources. A recent study conducted across the rural-urban boundary of Raleigh, North Carolina, USA examined the feeding sources of urban and rural honey bees using δ13C measur ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences – New coral reef at Amazon river mouth discovered

Coffee break biogeosciences – New coral reef at Amazon river mouth discovered

At the Amazon river mouth, a huge 9,300 sq km coral reef system has been found below the muddy waters off the mouth of the river Amazon. As corals mostly thrive in clear, sunlit, salt water, and the waters near the mouth of the Amazon are some of the muddiest in the world, the discovery of this almost 2000 km long reef leaves scientists puzzled about the potential extent of coral reefs worldwide. ...[Read More]

General assembly 2016: our session picks

General assembly 2016: our session picks

Whether you’re an experienced attendee of the EGU GA, or this is your first time there are always things to look out for, it is always worth attending your division’s division meeting, one of the great debates, and keep an eye out for short courses which may be of interest to you. Here are the recommendations from the Biogeosciences Blogging team: The BG division meeting is Thursday from 12:15-13: ...[Read More]

Digging up bones for science – looking into 48 million years old blood vessel-like structures

Digging up bones for science – looking into 48 million years old blood vessel-like structures

The Messel Pit is a worldwide famous fossil site recognized by UNESCO as a World Natural Heritage Site because of the exceptional preservation, as well as the diversity of its fossils from the early-middle Eocene (~48 Ma). The Messel Pit, located in an old Quarry in Germany near Frankfurt am Main , includes fossils from vertebrates (turtles, crocodiles, mammals, birds, lizards, among others), inve ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences – using truffle dogs for science!

Coffee break biogeosciences –  using truffle dogs for science!

Coffee break biogeosciences, your bi-weekly biogeoscience cake to accompany your coffee… Do you remember your last scientific conference? Did you also find the scientific coffee break discussion as interesting as the scientific talks? If yes, these short blog posts will allow you to keep the interesting coffee break discussions going as we´ll give you on a bi-weekly basis your scientific bio ...[Read More]

Sky-scraping Biogeoscience at 325m above the Amazonian rainforest

Sky-scraping Biogeoscience at 325m above the Amazonian rainforest

“The outcome of this project will help us to understand the Amazonian forest system before we all destroy it completely” The Amazon Rainforest in South America represents the Earth´s largest rainforest, housing at least 10% of the world´s known biodiversity and consisting of more than 350 billion individual trees. Besides its large diversity in floral and faunal species, the Amazonian ...[Read More]

Insights into the ocean crust and deep biosphere – ECORD Summer School 2015

Insights into the ocean crust and deep biosphere – ECORD Summer School 2015

Summer time as an early career geochemist can mean many things, to some it is vacation time, to others it is field season, and yet for others it is time to enroll in a summer school. ECORD, the European Consortium for Ocean Drilling, offers at least one summer school a year. If you work with foraminifera you may be familiar with the Urbino Summer School in Paleoclimatology, sorry to disappoint, bu ...[Read More]

The Panamanian Isthmus is not entirely guilty after all!

The Panamanian Isthmus is not entirely guilty after all!

  “According to new research, the land bridge connecting Central and South America rose more than 10 million years earlier than originally thought”   Traditionally, closure of the Panama Isthmus has been deemed responsible for the co-occurrence of two major events: The large Pleistocene glaciations and the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). Existing evidence indicating a ca ...[Read More]

Welcome to the multi-faceted world of biogeosciences

Welcome to the multi-faceted world of biogeosciences

“From marine micro-organisms to mountain ecosystems” Welcome to the official blog of the Biogeosciences (BG) Division of the European Geoscience Union! This blog is run by biogeoscience enthusiasts with very different backgrounds, ranging from plantecophysiology over geology to geomicrobiology. Therefore we think that the variety of posts, will make this blog interesting for all intere ...[Read More]