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Biogeosciences

Biogeosciences

Understanding the role of microbes in cold seep habitats

Understanding the role of microbes in cold seep habitats

A cold seep is an area of the ocean seafloor where hydrogen sulfide, methane and other hydrocarbon-rich fluid seepage occurs. These parts of the ocean floor still remain a large mystery for scientists, in particular for the occurence of hydrothermal vents. In between these vents, microbes live that play a role in the local and global carbon budget. However their exact role remains largerly unknown ...[Read More]

Identification of past methane emission altering the foraminiferal tests by secondary overgrowth of calcium carbonate.

Identification of past methane emission altering the foraminiferal tests by secondary overgrowth of calcium carbonate.

Ever heard about foraminifera? These tiny benthic (living at the seafloor) marine organisms are common in oceans across the globe and can be used to accurately give relative dates to sedimentary rocks. But we can also use them to identify past methane emissions from the seabed by studing their test or shell!   The measurements were done on foraminifera called Cassidulina neoteretis , which is a ty ...[Read More]

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Ever wondered how we can measure methane emssions from the seafloor ? And ever wanted to steer a mini submarine remotely operating vehicle (ROV)? Well here´s your chance! Have look at this blog post on analyzing methane emissions using ROVs and you´re ready to embark!    The goal is to determine when the gas leak started and how the fluid flow systems work. With our research, we can contribut ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–high resolution δ18O record from bivalves

Coffee break biogeosciences–high resolution δ18O record from bivalves

Much like trees, clam shells have growth rings. The chemistry of these rings can be used as a proxy for ocean chemistry. Recently, an international team of scientists used the growth rings found in shells of Arctica islandica to produce an annual absolutely dated marine δ18O record for the last millennium which was published in Nature Communications. The record represents the first fine scale arch ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–in situ sub-millimeter scale resolution imaging of benthic environments

Coffee break biogeosciences–in situ sub-millimeter scale resolution imaging of benthic environments

Coral reefs and other benthic marine ecosystems play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycles of our oceans. However, laboratory based study of these environments ranges from being difficult to actually impossible. In order to look at the microscopic-scale processes that occur in the benthic environment a team of scientists developed the Benthic Underwater Microscope (BUM). The device, w ...[Read More]

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

This bag belongs to Joshua Dean, Postdoc, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Field Work location Far Eastern Siberian Arctic: Kytalyk Nature Reserve. Duration of field work 2 weeks plus 3 days travel either side. Items in the bag Detecto Pak-Infrared (DP-IR) gas analyser [borrowed from colleagues, protect at all costs] EGM4 CO2 gas analyser [borrowed from another department, protect at all costs] water ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences – climate change affects mountain plant’s sex ratios

Coffee break biogeosciences – climate change affects mountain plant’s sex ratios

As climate change progresses, widespread changes in phenotypes in many plant populations are bing observed by scientists around the world. For instance in alpine areas, dominant plant species on lower altitude are shifting towards higher altitude as they adapt to increasing temperatures, thereby competing with high-altitude native plant species. In a recent study by Petry et al. (2016) it was show ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–The oldest known fossilized active root meristem

Coffee break biogeosciences–The oldest known fossilized active root meristem

Meristems are groups of undifferentiated cells found in growth zones of plants. Active meristem zones have a different cellular organization than inactive zones, and up until recently no fossilized active root meristem had been found. A team of scientists recently found and described the fossilized remains of an actively growing root meristem dating from the Carboniferous. The fossil, named Radix ...[Read More]

Keeping a lookout at the edge of the world

Keeping a lookout at the edge of the world

  Few places in the world conjure up images of remoteness and harshness like Far Eastern Siberia. Yet, it’s places like these where our science is needed most. Arctic soils hold vast amount of carbon, protected in thick layers of permafrost, but these stores are becoming more and more vulnerable as temperatures in the Arctic warm, and are set to warm faster than anywhere else on the planet. R ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–Urban bees found to feed on flowers

Coffee break biogeosciences–Urban bees found to feed on flowers

Honey bees, a highly important pollinator, have suffered a number of declines and population collapses in recent years. The growth of urban centers has contributed to a loss of foraging habitat and an introduction of new food sources. A recent study conducted across the rural-urban boundary of Raleigh, North Carolina, USA examined the feeding sources of urban and rural honey bees using δ13C measur ...[Read More]