BG
Biogeosciences

Biogeosciences

Welcome back to EGU’s Biogeosciences Division Blog!

Welcome back to EGU’s Biogeosciences Division Blog!

After a brief hiatus, the blog will be restarting under the joint editorship of Hana Jurikova, Alexandra Rodler, and Joshua Dean.   Hana is a is a postdoctoral researcher at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences – Helmholtz Centre Potsdam in Germany. Her research primarily involves the application and development of novel isotopic techniques to gain insights into climatic and environ ...[Read More]

Welcome to EGU 2018!

Dear all BG members, welcome to EGU 2018! Remember our annual BG Division meeting that will be held on Thursday, April 12, 12:15-13:15 in Room L2. Enclosed the Agenda. This year, the Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal of our Division is awarded to Antje Boetius. All invited at the Medal Lecture on Tuesday, April 10, 14:00–15:00 in Room C See you all this evening for the ice breaker at the Opening ...[Read More]

abstract submission

We are sorry to hear that people are experiencing difficulties submitting their last-minute #EGU18 abstracts & paying the APCs. If this is the case for you, you will be able to submit your abstract later today

Understanding the role of microbes in cold seep habitats

Understanding the role of microbes in cold seep habitats

A cold seep is an area of the ocean seafloor where hydrogen sulfide, methane and other hydrocarbon-rich fluid seepage occurs. These parts of the ocean floor still remain a large mystery for scientists, in particular for the occurence of hydrothermal vents. In between these vents, microbes live that play a role in the local and global carbon budget. However their exact role remains largerly unknown ...[Read More]

Identification of past methane emission altering the foraminiferal tests by secondary overgrowth of calcium carbonate.

Identification of past methane emission altering the foraminiferal tests by secondary overgrowth of calcium carbonate.

Ever heard about foraminifera? These tiny benthic (living at the seafloor) marine organisms are common in oceans across the globe and can be used to accurately give relative dates to sedimentary rocks. But we can also use them to identify past methane emissions from the seabed by studing their test or shell!   The measurements were done on foraminifera called Cassidulina neoteretis , which is a ty ...[Read More]

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Ever wondered how we can measure methane emssions from the seafloor ? And ever wanted to steer a mini submarine remotely operating vehicle (ROV)? Well here´s your chance! Have look at this blog post on analyzing methane emissions using ROVs and you´re ready to embark!    The goal is to determine when the gas leak started and how the fluid flow systems work. With our research, we can contribut ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–high resolution δ18O record from bivalves

Coffee break biogeosciences–high resolution δ18O record from bivalves

Much like trees, clam shells have growth rings. The chemistry of these rings can be used as a proxy for ocean chemistry. Recently, an international team of scientists used the growth rings found in shells of Arctica islandica to produce an annual absolutely dated marine δ18O record for the last millennium which was published in Nature Communications. The record represents the first fine scale arch ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences–in situ sub-millimeter scale resolution imaging of benthic environments

Coffee break biogeosciences–in situ sub-millimeter scale resolution imaging of benthic environments

Coral reefs and other benthic marine ecosystems play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycles of our oceans. However, laboratory based study of these environments ranges from being difficult to actually impossible. In order to look at the microscopic-scale processes that occur in the benthic environment a team of scientists developed the Benthic Underwater Microscope (BUM). The device, w ...[Read More]

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

This bag belongs to Joshua Dean, Postdoc, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Field Work location Far Eastern Siberian Arctic: Kytalyk Nature Reserve. Duration of field work 2 weeks plus 3 days travel either side. Items in the bag Detecto Pak-Infrared (DP-IR) gas analyser [borrowed from colleagues, protect at all costs] EGM4 CO2 gas analyser [borrowed from another department, protect at all costs] water ...[Read More]

Coffee break biogeosciences – climate change affects mountain plant’s sex ratios

Coffee break biogeosciences – climate change affects mountain plant’s sex ratios

As climate change progresses, widespread changes in phenotypes in many plant populations are bing observed by scientists around the world. For instance in alpine areas, dominant plant species on lower altitude are shifting towards higher altitude as they adapt to increasing temperatures, thereby competing with high-altitude native plant species. In a recent study by Petry et al. (2016) it was show ...[Read More]