TS
Tectonics and Structural Geology

EGU

Introducing our new blog team!

Introducing our new blog team!

After three succesful first years of the Tectonics and Structural Geology blog, it is time to bring our platform to the next level! To provide you more frequent content over a wide range of topics, we invited some new people to join our team. We are still always on the lookout for new guest authors and/or team members, so let us know if you want to contribute! So, what will you be reading on our blog? We will continue the successful Minds over Methods and Geology in the City series, but we have some great new things coming up as well. Since our Meeting Plate Tectonics series is coming to an end, we plan on including new interviews with scientists from the TS field, that will hopefully continue you to inspire you. And we are very happy to have brought back to life our Features from the Field series, where we discuss common structures in the field in an accessible way. Curious to know about the other new content of the blog? Stay tuned!

So, who are those people behind the Tectonics and Structural Geology blog?

 

Elenora van Rijsingen

I am a postdoc in geophysics at École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France. In my research I focus on seismotectonics, using various methods to understand more about earthquakes in subduction zones. I am fascinated by nature, and especially the power of it. Thinking of what nature is capable of reminds me of how small us humans actually are, and helps me to put things in perspective. I have been part of the TS blog since the beginning, trying to create continuous content and to bring in new people. I love editing blog posts, such as the Minds over Methods blogs, interacting with other scientists about their work and learning many new things. I occasionally write blogs myself as well, such as the Mind Your Head series about mental health in academia, a topic I believe deserves more attention. Please contact me via e-mail if you have any questions or ideas about the blog.

 

David Fernández-Blanco

I’m an early career tectonicist that likes to mingle with other disciplines… and making lists. My big goal in life is to understand how the Earth’s vertical motions evolve in time. To answer this question, I do 3 things that I love. [1] Fieldwork, especially in islands and other areas where I might get burned and I have to hand-speak for anything I might need; [2] Mingle things around using bits and pieces from other disciplines, especially geomorphology, stratigraphy, geodynamics. [3] Take up the challenge of geo-communication and translate our geeky, scienc-y, sometimes complicated geo-knowledge to a more general audience. That’s maybe my favourite 3-item list! (I said I like lists, remember?). I also like music, movies, travelling and drinking with my friends, just like every Tom, Dick and Harry. I’m currently the ECS TS Representative, so get in contact via e-mail or reach me at @_GeoDa_ or visit my webpage. Rock on!

 

Derya Guerer

I am a Lecturer in Earth Sciences at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. My research evolves around tectonics and the evolution of Earth’s lithosphere at various spatio-temporal scales. I combine field-based observations (structural geology, stratigraphy) with laboratory analysis (U-Pb geochronology, paleomagnetism, micro-structural analyses) to build kinematic reconstructions and compare those to the structure of the underlying mantle imaged by seismic tomography. My current research projects focus on subduction-dominated records in the Tethyan region (with focus on Turkey, Iran and Ladakh Himalaya) and recently the SW Pacific realm. As part of the blog team I am happy to edit blogs, particularly for the ‘Minds over Methods’ series and also to occasionally contribute myself. In my free time, I enjoy the outdoors, travel, food and a good cup of coffee with friends. You can reach me via e-mail.

 

 

Anne Pluymakers

I am a post-doctoral researcher in the Rock Mechanics Lab at TU Delft, in the Netherlands. My work-related hobby is figuring out how rocks break, and how fluids affect fracture dynamics. My main rock of interest is limestone at the moment, but I also happily work on related topics, such as what do fractures in natural rocks look like, and imaging projects on fluid flow. I  mostly do laboratory work, and any associated microstructural investigations. But there are also the occasional field excursions, to not lose touch with geology. In the blogteam I am happy to edit blogs, and also to occasionally contribute myself. Outside of work, I love sitting in the sun with a decent cup of coffee and a good book, or to organize dinners for my friends. You can reach me via e-mail.

 
Samuele Papeschi

I have recently gained my PhD at the University of Florence (Italy) and -before that- I graduated in geology at the University of Pisa. My research is focused on understanding deformation of rocks, investigated in the field and in the lab. I combine classic structural geology techniques, like field surveying, with powerful analytical tools such as electron back scatter diffraction and electron microprobe. I like to share everything from what I am researching to observations from the field. I believe, indeed, that research is not done if it’s not shared! I also run one of the most useless geoscience facebook pages: Geology is the Way. The field is my natural habitat and I will share snapshots from it in the ‘Features from the Field’ series, hoping that you will enjoy looking at it through my eyes. You can reach me via e-mail.

 

Hannah Davies

I am a PhD student at Lisbon University, Portugal. Using numerical models and GPlates, I am investigating the link between plate tectonics and tides in the deep future and past. It was recently discovered that tides change over geological time scales as ocean basins change shape due to plate tectonics. As an editor and writer of the TS blog I want to bring this newly discovered link between tides and tectonics to an audience which may not have heard of it yet. When I am not doing real science, I am devouring science fiction. I spend a good amount of my free time in coffee shops reading. When I don’t read, I like to explore Lisbon. It is a very old place with a lot of history from the past two millennia so there is always somewhere interesting to find. You can reach me via e-mail.

 

Silvia Brizzi

I am a postdoctoral researcher in the Natural and Experimental Tectonic group at the University of Parma, Italy. My research is aimed at understanding the relationship between geodynamic parameters and the seismogenic behaviour of the subduction megathrust. More specifically, by combining observational and analog modelling approaches, I try to understand if specific (geodynamic) conditions can favour the occurrence of very large earthquakes in subduction zones. At present, I am working (really hard!) to measure and calibrate the rheological properties of innovative materials with complex rheologies to better mimic Earth’s behavior in the lab (yes, The Sassy Scientist, I am actually spending months on this!!). I am really excited to be part of the blog team as an editor. I will also be in charge of sharing our activities on Twitter. In my spare time, I love to read books and binge-watching TV series. Oh, and I also love aperitivo with friends. You can reach me via e-mail.