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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

The Seismica Initiative: towards a community-driven, Diamond Open Access journal for seismological research

The Seismica Initiative: towards a community-driven, Diamond Open Access journal for seismological research

It all started with a tweet from @NatureNews (the news team of Springer Nature): In general, academics welcome Open Access (OA) initiatives; however, this particular tweet has been met with stiff criticism. Unethical profit-seeking, financial gatekeeping, academic elitism, and straining scientific budgets were commonly raised concerns among the many retweets and replies. Unfortunately, these conce ...[Read More]

Geology Bites: Special Issue on Seismology

Geology Bites: Special Issue on Seismology

Geology Bites: Podcast conversations about geology with researchers making key contributions to our understanding of the Earth and the Solar System Since you are reading an EGU Blog, you must already know how remarkable the field of geology is. The subject matter stretches the imagination – with its almost cosmological timescales, processes operating on scales from the atomic to the continental, a ...[Read More]

Field work in winter in Iceland: The beautiful nature of Strokkur geyser

Field work in winter in Iceland: The beautiful nature of Strokkur geyser

I was fascinated and excited on my first trip to Iceland in August 2010; just a few months after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull that affected the air traffic across Europe for a few days. Besides these dangerous volcanoes, the Icelandic landscape is beautiful, rough, wide and impressive with elements such as water and ice interacting directly at some locations. Part of this trip was, of course, ...[Read More]

Thirty-nine days onboard the Langseth

Thirty-nine days onboard the Langseth

When you picture sailing on a ship, what do you imagine? Cool breezes, salt spray, glorious sunrises, the peaceful sounds of breaking waves and passing gulls’ cries? As it turns out, you can go for multiple days at sea without directly looking at, smelling, or hearing the ocean waves – at least, you can if you sail on a 71-meter-long marine seismic research vessel like the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. ...[Read More]