EGU Blogs

215 search results for "women in science"

GeoLog

Who do you think most deserves the title of the Mother of Geology?

Who do you think most deserves the title of the Mother of Geology?

Much ink is spilled hailing the work of the early fathers of geology – and rightly so! James Hutton is the mind behind the theory of uniformitarianism, which underpins almost every aspect of geology and argues that processes operating at present operated in the same manner over geological time, while Sir Charles Lyell furthered the idea of geological time. William Smith, the coal miner and canal b ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: A sunrise over Kelimutu’s three-colour lakes

Imaggeo on Mondays: A sunrise over Kelimutu’s three-colour lakes

Volcanoes are undeniably home to some of the most beautiful landscapes on Earth. It doesn’t take much imagination to picture slopes of exceedingly fertile mineral rich soils, covered in lush vegetation; high peaks punching through cloud cover offering stunning vistas and bubbling pools of geothermally warmed waters were one can soak ones worries away. What about strikingly coloured crater lakes? Y ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

Meet the new ECS Reps!

At the last EGU general assembly, Matthew Agius has stepped down as main early career scientist (ECS) representative and a new team assembled around Laura Parisi has taken over! Gender equality is not maintained, instead we are very proud to announce a 4/2 women/men distribution. Let us take the opportunity to briefly introduce ourselves. We would also like this opportunity to again acknowledge th ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

Peer review: Single-, double-blind, or open discussion

Public, blind, or not so blind review process. Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajc1/

Within the scientific community, it is common practice that the peer-review process for a submitted article to a journal is kept anonymous. That is, only the journal Editor selects (and knows) who the referees are, usually three. This is also known as single-blind review. One of the main reason behind this custom is to allow the referees give genuine feedback, without fear of causing any personal ...[Read More]

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Cruising for mud: Sediments from the ocean floor as a climate indicator

Cruising for mud: Sediments from the ocean floor as a climate indicator

Going on a cruise for a month sounds tempting for most people and that is exactly how I spent one month of my summer. Instead of sunshine and 25 degrees, the temperature was closer to the freezing point on the thermometer and normal summer weather was replaced by milder weather conditions. The destination of the cruise was the western Nordic Sea and the east Greenland Margin. The ice2ice cruise wa ...[Read More]

ERE
Energy, Resources and the Environment

Funding opportunity for Early Career Researchers to attend GSA Baltimore

The Heritage Stone Task Group in southern Europe is a Task Group within the IUGS. In March, HSTG  had a proposal accepted as Project 637 of the International Geoscience Programme (IGCP 637). With this acceptance, IGCP 637 offered $US6,000 in 2015 to support conference participation. HSTG has decided that this funding should be used in 2015 to support attendance to our session in the GSA Baltimore ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

EGU15 Feature: Equipping to Educate, Educating for Empowerment

Education empowers communities and enables effective accountability between individuals, scientists, government, business and the charity sector. Geo-education is no exception, and while natural hazards education is only one area of this, it demonstrates well the importance of knowledge exchange. In this first blog, from the EGU Press Office, I explore this theme further, reflecting on the role of ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Guest Blog: Scarcity-Waste – The Syngenta Photography Award 2015

Guest Blog: Scarcity-Waste – The Syngenta Photography Award 2015

Luke Maxfield is an undergraduate student and GfGD Ambassador at Oxford University. Today he writes about a recent visit to a photography exhibition at Somerset House (London, UK) on the theme of Scarcity-Waste: Upon entering the Syngenta Photography Award exhibition visitors are greeted with one of those worrying statistics: “In the past 50 years, the world’s demand for natural resour ...[Read More]

VolcanicDegassing

The great eruption of Tambora, April 1815

April 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the great eruption of Tambora, on Sumbawa island, Indonesia. This eruption is the largest known explosive eruption for at least the past 500 years, and the most destructive in terms of lives lost, even though the precise scale of the eruption remains uncertain. The Tambora eruption is also one of the largest known natural perturbations to the climate syste ...[Read More]

Geology for Global Development

Friday Photo (127) – Slow Water Collection, Tanzania

Water Collection – Chato District, Tanzania Some of these women and children in Tanzania had been waiting at these small holes for 5 hours for enough water to seep through the ground to fill their buckets. Understanding enough geoscience to consider (i) changing groundwater levels at different times of the year and (ii) different geological material permeabilities, could have helped remove t ...[Read More]