GeoLog
Chloe Hill

Chloe Hill

Chloe Hill is the Policy Officer at the European Geosciences Union. Chloe graduated with a Masters in Environmental Governance from at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität of Freiburg. Before starting with the EGU, Chloe worked with action-orientated research and policy processes in both Europe and Asia. Chloe tweets at @Chl0e_Hill

Imaggeo Photo Competition finalists 2019 – who will you vote for?

Imaggeo Photo Competition finalists 2019 – who will you vote for?

This year’s Photo Competition judging panel received more than 600 photo submissions, covering fields across the geosciences. The fantastic finalist photos are below and they are being exhibited in Hall X2 (basement, Brown Level) of the Austria Center Vienna – see for yourself!

Do you have a favourite? Vote for it! There is a voting terminal (also in Hall X2), just next to the exhibit. Voting closes by Thursday 11 April and the winners will be announced online on Friday!

Time flows as the climate is changing. Credit: Kasia Tokarska (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A long-exposure look at Brúarfoss waterfall in Iceland.

 

Aurora show on the road. Credit: Junbin Zhao (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Busy drivers pass by without noticing the beautiful northern lights’ show overhead.

Pulp ……eruption! Credit: Valerio Acocella (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A close-up of a vent erupting blobs of blood-red basaltic magma during the Mt. Etna 2001 eruption, one of the most important of this volcano in the last century. This eruption marked a new cycle in the recent life of Etna and is also associated with flank instability threatening the lower inhabited eastern slope.

 

Temporary pond within ice fall of Fox Glacier. Credit: Stefan Winkler (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A temporary pond of meltwater on the surface of Fox Glacier, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Due to the fast movement and the rough surface, there is not an established supraglacial or englacial meltwater system resulting in temporary ponds forming and subsequently draining during over several weeks to a few months.

 

43°29’S 147°08’E – Meet me at the lighthouse. Credit: Vytas Huth (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Light pollution is an environmental hazard we often overlook. When I had the chance to view the Southern Hemisphere’s night sky with only the Antarctic Ocean in front of me, I realised how much we have already lost in the Northern Hemisphere and Europe. It almost seems as if the night is becoming extinct.

 

Something sticks out. Credit: Sophie von Fromm (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). While the windblown sand buries everything beneath, a lonely stick remains standing. Such sand storms occur quite frequently at the Gobabeb Training and Research Centre in the Namib Desert.

 

Coloured canyon curves. Credit: Nikita Churilin (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The morning sunlight is reflecting in the grains of sand in the Lower Antelope Canyon and paint the canyon in unusual colours.

 

Humans’ route in harmony with nature. Credit: Anatolii Chernov (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Carpathian Mountains in Western Ukraine are a nice place to learn about structural geology and for relaxation. It is a pleasure to observe beautiful corners of the Earth, where people try to respect and cherish natural beauty.

 

Message from the deep. Credit: Katja Bigge (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). Stromboli volcano, the original example of Strombolian activity defined by small regular eruptions.

 

A frozen time capsule. Credit: Florian Konrad (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Schwarzmooskogel-Höhlensystem is located in the Totes Gebirge in Austria and consists of 17 individual caves with a total length of about 140km. Inside, it felt like time did not pass or just passed really slowly. The shapes that the ice had sculptured were endless and took our breath away.

The EGU General Assembly will take place from 07 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For the full session programme and more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

GeoPolicy: Science for Policy at the 2019 General Assembly!

GeoPolicy: Science for Policy at the 2019 General Assembly!

The EGU General Assembly is the largest geoscience meeting in Europe. Not only does it have a diverse array of sessions that you can attend within your own area of expertise but there are also thousands of sessions that will be outside of your research field, as well as sessions on topics that can be applied to a wide range of scientific divisions, jobs and industries – such as science for policy

The line-up for the 2019 EGU General Assembly includes Short Courses, Disciplinary Sessions, Townhall Meetings, Interdisciplinary Sessions and Union-wide Sessions that focus on various aspects of science-policy. Even if you’re just a bit curious about science for policy, it’s definitely worth adding a couple of the policy related sessions outlined below into your #EGU19 schedule!

Science and Society (SCS)

Science and Society is the new union-wide session format that provides a space to host scientific forums dedicated to connecting with high-level institutions and engaging the public and policymakers.

  • Plan-S: Should scientific publishers be forced to go Open Access: With support from the European Commission and European Research Council, plan S demands that research supported by participating funders must be published in Open Access journals by January 1, 2020. This session will debate the questions surrounding the implementation of the plan and its consequences.
  • Past and future tipping points and large climate transitions in Earth history: This session will discuss the advances in modeling forces triggering and amplifying Earth’s climate and carbon cycle. Given that Earth’s climate is currently experiencing an unprecedented transition under anthropogenic pressure, understanding the mechanisms behind the scene is vital and can help steer policy.

Short Courses (SC)

Disciplinary Sessions

Please keep in mind, that this isn’t an exhaustive list! There are a lot of other sessions at the EGU that can either be directly linked with science for policy or that include research relevant for policymakers. You can find more policy-related sessions on the EGU General Assembly Programme (which you can access online and via the EGU2019 mobile app) and through the General Assembly special sessions page. This page tags sessions under the categories of policy, diversity, media, early career scientists and public engagement so that GA participants with an interest in these topics can find relevant sessions quickly. If you think a session or event within one of these categories is missing, please email the EGU Media and Communications Manager at media@egu.eu with a link to the session, and the category where it should be listed and why.

If you have any further questions or comments regarding the EGU General Assembly’s policy activities, feel free to get in touch via email or come and meet me and the rest of the EGU office in person at the EGU Booth on Friday April 12, 10:15–10:45.