GeoLog
Hazel Gibson

Hazel Gibson

Hazel Gibson is the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union. She is responsible for the management of the Union's social media presence and the EGU blogs, where she writes regularly for the EGU's official blog, GeoLog. She is also the point of contact for early career scientists (ECS) at the EGU Office. She has a PhD in Geoscience Communication and Cognition from the University of Plymouth in the UK. Hazel tweets @iamhazelgibson.

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during October!

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during October!

Each month we feature specific Divisions of EGU and during the monthly GeoRoundup we will be putting the journals that publish science from those Divisions at the top of the Highlights roundup. For October, the Divisions we are featuring are: Natural Hazards (NH), Hydrological Sciences (HS) and Seismology (SM). They are served by the journals: Geoscientific Model Development (GMD), Hydrology and E ...[Read More]

Earth Science Week 2020: Earth Materials in Our Lives – an A-Z!

Earth Science Week 2020: Earth Materials in Our Lives – an A-Z!

Since 1998 the American Geosciences Institute has been running an annual celebration of all things geoscience – Earth Science Week. From its inception, Earth Science Week has grown in popularity and is now celebrated across the planet. This year Earth Science Week will run from 11 to 17 October and the theme of the week is  “Earth Materials in Our Lives.” As the American Geoscien ...[Read More]

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during September!

GeoRoundup: the highlights of EGU Journals published during September!

Each month we feature specific Divisions of EGU and during the monthly GeoRoundup we will be putting the journals that publish science from those Divisions at the top of the Highlights roundup. For September, the Divisions we are featuring are: Energy, Resources and Environment (ERE) and Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology and Volcanology (GMPV). They are served by the journals: Geoscientific Mode ...[Read More]

Friedrich Mohs and the mineral scale of hardness

Friedrich Mohs and the mineral scale of hardness

One of the most famous identification methods in the study of mineralogy is the Mohs Scale of Hardness. A comparative scale, based on the hardness of each mineral, it is a way geoscientists can compare minerals to each other and organise them based upon an easily testable physical characteristic. Each level of hardness has a value, from 1 (the softest) to 10 (the hardest) and each number is associ ...[Read More]