EGU Blogs

Highlights

CR
Cryospheric Sciences

Cruising for mud: Sediments from the ocean floor as a climate indicator

Cruising for mud: Sediments from the ocean floor as a climate indicator

Going on a cruise for a month sounds tempting for most people and that is exactly how I spent one month of my summer. Instead of sunshine and 25 degrees, the temperature was closer to the freezing point on the thermometer and normal summer weather was replaced by milder weather conditions. The destination of the cruise was the western Nordic Sea and the east Greenland Margin. The ice2ice cruise wa ...[Read More]

GeoLog

GeoTalk: Wouter Berghuijs, Union Level Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Wouter Berghuijs, Union Level Early Career Scientist Representative

The EGU offers a platform for early career scientists (ECS) to become involved in interdisciplinary research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, through sessions, social events and short courses at the annual General Assembly in April. One of the ways of ensuring that the voice of the Union’s ECS membership is heard is via the division early career scientist representatives. Feedback gathe ...[Read More]

SM
Seismology

To b, not to b, or to b with Voronoi?

To b, not to b, or to b with Voronoi?

The b-value is that parameter of the Gutenberg-Richter relation which controls the ratio of small to large earthquakes. Intriguing temporal and spatial variations of the b-value have been reported in recent years, for example sudden b-value changes at active fault zones. Are such sharp spatial b-value variations merely a result of crude undersampling? To address this unsettling question, a recentl ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Geosciences Column: What made the comet sing?

Geosciences Column: What made the comet sing?

Late last year the Rosetta’s Plasma Consortium (RPC) announced that Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft has been studying since August 2014, was singing into space. Now, in a paper published today in the EGU’s open access journal Annales Geophysicae, the RPC team reveals more details about 67P’s song, including why the comet was singing. The sounds ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Velociraptor in the Zagros Mountains

Imaggeo on Mondays: Velociraptor in the Zagros Mountains

How many times have you turned your head up to the sky and spotted familiar shapes in the clouds? Viewing structures from afar can reveal interesting, common and, sometimes, funny patterns. Satellite images are often used to map geological terrains. They offer a bird’s eye view of the planet and the opportunity to see broad scale structures, the scale of which would be impossible to grasp from the ...[Read More]

GeoLog

A guide to convening a session at the EGU General Assembly – Part I

A guide to convening a session at the EGU General Assembly – Part I

Convening a session at a conference can seem daunting, especially if you are an early career research and a first-time convener. That’s why we’ve put together this two part series to outline the main steps of the process. With the call for sessions for the 2016 EGU General Assembly open until 18 September 2015, now is the perfect time to give it a go! The key ingredients are an idea for a session, ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Mesopotamia, the ancient land between rivers

Imaggeo on Mondays: Mesopotamia, the ancient land between rivers

Mesopotamia, an area rich in history and considered as the cradle of civilisation, with the first populations establishing themselves in the region some 6000 years ago,lies between two great rivers: the Euphrates and the Tigris. The ancient territory spans areas of modern-day Iraq, Kuwait, the northeastern section of Syria and small sections of southeastern Turkey and southwestern Iran. The histor ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Geosciences Column: The calamity of eruptions, or an eruption of benefits?

Geosciences Column: The calamity of eruptions, or an eruption of benefits?

So here is a question: why would anyone want to live in the vicinity of an active volcano? The risks are well known, with hazards arising from lava flows, lahars, ash falls, debris avalanches, and pyroclastic density currents, with many often having deadly consequences. But despite the danger, more than half a billion people live in the direct vicinity of volcanoes. Could it be that communities pr ...[Read More]

GeoLog

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis. If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: The warming

Imaggeo on Mondays: The warming

Events of meteorological significance, such as thunderstorms, hurricanes, cyclones, jet streams and global-scale circulations can be described by a general term: atmospheric dynamics. When it comes to it, atmospheric dynamics deals with nothing more than air, which, in truth, is very difficult to directly observe, (with the exception of clouds and precipitation). This makes the study of atmospheri ...[Read More]