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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo On Monday: Watercolors- Nature’s talent

Imaggeo On Monday: Watercolors- Nature’s talent

The photo was taken from the International Space Station (ISS), approx. 400 km above the Earth, in the educational project administered by NASA: Sally Ride EarthKAM, Mission 59, November 2017. The image was requested by a team of students from my college, coordinated by me. Even though we weren’t there, on ISS, to trigger the camera, all the locations in which the photographs were taken are ...[Read More]

The benefits of online writing retreats in these weird times

The benefits of online writing retreats in these weird times

The world shut down due to COVID-19, but PhDs did not. During these unfamiliar times, most PhD students have found themselves working from home trying more than ever to write as much as possible.  Over the past few of months, I have led several online writing retreats in collaboration with doctoral research schools and universities in Norway. They seem to have been very successful to help PhD’s wi ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Geoscientific selfie at the Dead Sea

Imaggeo On Monday: Geoscientific selfie at the Dead Sea

This is an aerial image taken from a balloon at around 150m height, at the eastern shoreline of the Dead Sea. Such “selfies” are scientifically valuable, providing important data that help researchers to analyze the morphology of the retreating lake and investigate associated hazards like sinkholes, subsidence and landslides. The older shorelines, visible as lines on the shore stand fo ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Mondays: The valley along the fault

Imaggeo On Mondays: The valley along the fault

The Idrija fault is a an active fault crossing Slovenia for more than 100 km in a NW-SE direction and is responsible for several important geological features in the country. Among them, we can mention the former-active mercury mine of Idrija which has registered as a Unesco World Heritage site since 2012.   Another example that demonstrates the impact of this fault is it’s effect on th ...[Read More]