GeoLog

Olivia Trani

Olivia Trani is the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union. She is responsible for the management of the Union's social media presence and the EGU blogs, where she writes regularly for the EGU's official blog, GeoLog. She is also the point of contact for early career scientists (ECS) at the EGU Office. Olivia has a MS in Science Journalism from Boston University and her work has appeared on WBUR-FM, Inside Science News Service, and the American Geophysical Union. Olivia tweets at @oliviatrani.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

Imaggeo on Mondays: Refuge in a cloudscape

The action of glaciers combined with the structure of the rock to form this little platform, probably once a small lake enclosed between a moraine at the mountain side and the ice in the valley.

Now it has become a green haven in the mountain landscape, a perfect place for an alp. In the Alps, stratus clouds opening up on autumn mornings often create gorgeous light display.

That day, some of the first light landed on this exact spot, while the mountain shadows still covered the valley bottom.

Description by Julien Seguinot, as it first appeared on imaggeo.egu.eu

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Introducing EGU’s new Communications Officer!

Introducing EGU’s new Communications Officer!

Meet the newest member of EGU’s communications team, Olivia Trani! Olivia joined the EGU office in February and since then has been managing GeoLog and the EGU blog network, running our social media channels, and developing EGU networking activities for early career scientists.

Hello from the EGU Executive Office! I have been working as the new EGU Communications Officer for the past few months (you may have seen me at the 2018 General Assembly), but I would like to take the time to officially introduce myself.

I am originally from the United States where I completed my bachelor’s in Biology and Environmental Science at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. As an undergraduate, I had many great research experiences, such as studying crabs and terrapins by canoe in the swamps of Virginia, hunting for American chestnuts in Maine’s hardwood forests, and examining microscopic fungi in the lab.

I then obtained a master’s in Science Journalism from Boston University, and following graduation, I had the opportunity to intern as a science writer for both Inside Science and the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Washington D.C.

A couple of months ago, I jumped over the Atlantic to join the EGU office team in Munich, and since then I have been managing EGU’s network of blogs and social media channels as well as organising initiatives for early career scientists. I also organised events geared towards science communication and early career scientists at the 2018 General Assembly. To do all this, I’ve been working closely with the EGU Media and Communications Manager, Bárbara Ferreira, and the EGU’s dedicated team of early career scientist representatives. I am very excited to continue sharing science here at the EGU office and collaborate with the EGU community!

Feel free to contact me at networking@egu.eu if you have any questions about EGU’s communication outlets or our early career scientist network. I look forward to hearing from you!

What’s on in Vienna this weekend

What’s on in Vienna this weekend

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few hours left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Relax with Vienna’s best coffee

You can’t visit Vienna without going for a coffee and a slice of Sacher torte in one of the city’s fine coffee establishments. Try Cafe Hawelka, once a hub of Viennese artists, or Cafe Central, the legendary literati cafe.

Explore architectural wonders

Immerse yourself in Vienna’s architectural heritage with a visit to Wien Museum Karlzplatz, where you will find an exhibition of Otto Wagner’s architectural works. Follow the exhibition with a walking tour of the city to see these wonders for yourself.

Wien Museum Karlsplatz (Credit: Kbsen, Wikimedia Commons)

Get into the jungle

Step outside of the city and explore the Lobau, a national park fondly known as ‘Vienna’s jungle’. Catch a boat straight from the old city and travel in style.

Gardens, palaces and plants fairs

Enjoy the Viennese spring sunshine in the botanical gardens this weekend and while you’re there drop in on Raritätenbörse, Vienna’s exotic plant fair in the Botanical Garden of the University of Vienna. For anyone looking for a botanical souvenir of EGU, there promises to be a big range of exotic plants on sale.  For the less green-fingered, why not head to the Belvedere Palace next door and explore some of the spectacular art on display.

Design markets in the Museum Quartier

For anyone interested in design, there is an international design market (WAMP) outside the Museum Quartier on Saturday. It promises to showcase the best of local and eastern European design, accompanied by tasty street food and a lively atmosphere.

Superfly birthday night

For anyone wanting to party, Superfly radio (a Viennese radio station) is holding a 8-floor extravaganza at the Ottakringer Brauerei to celebrate its 10 year birthday, boasting international acts and all-night music. Hip Hop, Disco, Soul, Electronic beats and breaks, House and Latin music are just some of the genres on offer for those who fancy letting their hair down on Friday evening.

Strauss and Mozart Concert at the Kursalon

In the home country of Strauss and Mozart, any fans of classical music should head to the Kursalon concert hall for the traditional Viennese experience. There are concerts every evening this weekend. For those who want to treat themselves, why not book a ‘Concert and Dinner ticket’ and enjoy a gala dinner before the show in the Kursalon’s Restaurant Johann.

Schönbrunn Palace

If rooms of Baroque glory are your thing, then Schönbrunn Palace is the place to go. At the end of the seventeenth century Emperor Leopold I commissioned the architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, who had received his training in Rome, to design an imperial hunting lodge for his son, Crown Prince Joseph, later to become Emperor Joseph I. The park at Schönbrunn Palace, complete with maze, vineyard and orangery, extends for 1.2 km from east to west and approximately one kilometre from north to south. Together with the palace, it was placed on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1996.

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Competition 2018!

The selection committee received over 600 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants at the 2018 General Assembly have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  of the conference and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to 2018’s fantastic photographers!

 

Foehn clouds in Patagonia,’ by Christoph Mayr (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A stationary cloud formed on the lee side of Mount Fitzroy. It evolved from a lenticular cloud (Altocumulus lenticularis) and turned into a funnel-shaped cloud during sunset when the photo was taken.

 

Jebel Bayda (White Mountain),’ by Luigi Vigliotti (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). An aerial view of the Jebel Bayda, a white volcano created by silica-rich lava (comendite) in the Khaybar region. The flank of the volcano was shaped by rain in the region during the first half of the Holocene.

 

Remains of a former ocean floor,’ by Jana Eichel (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). These limestone boulders characterise the landscape of Castle Hill Basin in New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The Pacific Plate collided with the Australian Plate during the Kaikoura Orogeny 25 million years ago, giving birth not only to the Southern Alps but also lifting up thick limestone beds formed in shallow ocean water.

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.