SSP
Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology
Chris Skinner

Chris Skinner

Chris Skinner is a numerical modeler at the University of Hull (UK) with experiences ranging from hydrometeorology to geomorphology. He is particularly interested in how sediment processes contribute to the evolution of flood risk. He is also a keen science communicator and leads the SeriousGeoGames Lab, which uses new and emerging technologies to share research. His fellowship funded by the University of Hull will draw on all these experiences to develop a novel modelling framework that forecasts sediment impact on flood risk and to share this information to communities at risk.

Congo Canyon: A Chat with Dr Steve Simmons

Congo Canyon: A Chat with Dr Steve Simmons

It is always an interesting period when the time comes around for me to write my blog for the SSP page. My research is predominantly in numerical modelling, which would be interesting if I was modelling awesome natural phenomena, but I don’t. I general assess the sensitivities of the numerical models to different sorts of uncertainty and whilst this is important work for understanding the outputs ...[Read More]

Slimy Landscapes 2: This time it’s Precambrian

Slimy Landscapes 2: This time it’s Precambrian

Slime is important to the developments of Earth’s landscapes – I have already explored this in a previous post where I learnt how Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS), a fancy phrase for a slime produced by organisms, can bind sediments together and making them resistant to erosion. This has impacts on the development of landscapes, from the types of bedforms forming below flows, the rate at w ...[Read More]

The Plastocene – Plastic in the sedimentary record

The Plastocene – Plastic in the sedimentary record

The University of Hull was privileged to host the annual British Science Festival in 2018. One of the key events was the Huxley Debate, which brings together world-leading experts to discuss a pressing issue facing society. The theme in Hull was “what do we do about ocean plastics?”. As part of the discussion, Professor Dan Parsons, Director of the Energy and Environment Institute, suggested that ...[Read More]

Slimy Landscapes

When we think about how our landscapes evolve and change we probably tend to go straight for the big stuff, things like the climate, tectonics or geology, and in my previous blog I looked at how rainfall contributes to changing the planet’s surface. However, it is not just the big stuff which controls these changes, smaller things do as well, for example changes in land cover (ie, from grasses to ...[Read More]