G
Geodesy

gravity

Want to really understand sea-level rise? Bring in the geodesists!

Want to really understand sea-level rise? Bring in the geodesists!

  A remarkably large number of papers and proposals have sentences like “this study is critical to better project future sea-level rise” in their introduction. Most times this is just marketing to trick reviewers and program managers into believing the work is important. On the other hand, geodetic papers and proposals have some compelling reasons to use this statement: a lot of geodetic tech ...[Read More]

Geodesists on Tour: On the left side of the road for getting the g

Geodesists on Tour: On the left side of the road for getting the g

Getting the small g (the absolute gravity value) outdoors has always been some sort of a challenge. But, in the early 2000s the possibility to measure gravity has changed by the arrival of the first A10 absolute gravimeters. They to a large extent revolutionized the approach of performing gravity measurements in the open field and with that improved the approach to design and measure national grav ...[Read More]

Geodesists on Tour: Gravity measurements on Antarctica

Geodesists on Tour: Gravity measurements on Antarctica

  Antarctica is well known for its large ice sheet, covering 98% of the continent. A large part of the ice sheet is losing mass leading to vertical and horizontal movements of the crust as well as changes of the gravitational attraction. To observe these changes in gravity with the highest accuracy, it is necessary to visit Antarctica and measure gravity on a regular basis. Since the late 198 ...[Read More]