G
Geodesy

edited by Öykü Koç

Öykü is a PhD student at Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Her research focus is the static and time-variable gravity field recovery from satellite data and also local gravity field modelling. She is working on mitigation of temporal aliasing for future gravity mission concepts with quantum technologies. Tweets as @callmeboyk, posts as @oykukoc.bsky.social

Bits and Bites of Geodesy – Satellite radar altimetry: How do we know that sea level is rising?

Bits and Bites of Geodesy – Satellite radar altimetry: How do we know that sea level is rising?

In a previous post, Thomas Frederikse briefly explained how geodesy is used to observe sea level change. In this part of Bits & Bites, Bene delves deeper into the topic. Rising sea levels are one of the consequences of climate change that already impacts people in low-lying coastal regions, and the future prospects are not exactly encouraging as well. We know that rising sea levels are caused ...[Read More]

Expanding the picture: What does a geodesist look like?

Expanding the picture: What does a geodesist look like?

Think of a geodesist. What names come up in you? What do they look like? Do they have glasses? Is their hair short or long, grey or blonde? What’s their country of origin? Can you imagine them wearing a dress? And how come so many of them run marathons? I’m joking, but hopefully you get the picture. Geodesists, especially the ones in power positions, are not the most diverse bunch of people. Since ...[Read More]

High resolution terrestrial water storage changes from combination of GRACE and models

High resolution terrestrial water storage changes from combination of GRACE and models

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission (2002-2017) consisted of two satellites at ~500 km altitude separated by 200 km, following each other in the same orbit. The distance between the two GRACE satellites changes because of the gravitational pull of the masses beneath the satellites. As such, mass changes at or near the Earth’s surface caused variations in the dista ...[Read More]

Reshaping Earth: GIA and its far-reaching effects

Reshaping Earth: GIA and its far-reaching effects

As the Geodesy blog team (we are growing, horaay!), we wanted to create a space for researchers to talk about their work/papers in a more simplified language. For the first post in this series, we said “Wouldn’t it be cool if we learn more about Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) models?” then we realised that we first need to uncover what GIA is. So, we passed the pen to Holger, Rebekka and Yuche ...[Read More]