G
Geodesy

Earth observation

Geodesy 101 Literature

Blackboard with the Geodesy 101 short course title

During this year’s EGU General Assembly (GA) we held the first Geodesy 101 Short Course, where we gave an introduction to satellite gravimetry, GNSS processing and geodetic reference frames. We want to thank all of you who attended in-person or virtually, and made the short course a great experience! Please provide us feedback, if you have attended the short course here. At the GA, we were only ab ...[Read More]

The comprehensive Geodetic Information Portal of GGOS

The comprehensive Geodetic Information Portal of GGOS

The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) is a collaborative contribution of the global geodesy community to the observation and monitoring of the Earth System. Geodesy is the science of determining the shape of the Earth, its gravity field, and its rotation as functions of time. Essential to reaching this goal are stable and consistent geodetic ...[Read More]

Geodesists on Tour: GNSS measurements in East Africa

Geodesists on Tour: GNSS measurements in East Africa

  Africa hosts the world’s most extensive subaerial rift system on Earth known as the East African Rift System (EARS). It stretches over 5000 km from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden intersection in the north to the Southwest Indian Spreading Ridge south of South Africa. East-West, the EARS spans the eastern border of the Democratic Republic of Congo across to eastern Madagascar over 3000 km. The ...[Read More]

Around the world with Professor Vening Meinesz onboard the submarine K-XVIII: Exploration of the Solid Earth

Around the world with Professor Vening Meinesz onboard the submarine K-XVIII: Exploration of the Solid Earth

  On 14th of November 1934, the Dutch travelled to the harbor of Den Helder situated in the north of the Netherlands to catch a glimpse of the departure of Hr. Ms. K-XVII: A submarine of the Royal Dutch Navy setting sail on a trip around the world. Onboard was a unique traveler and with his non-typical height of 2 meters tall, he towered above the average submarine sailor. Professor Vening Me ...[Read More]