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Climate: Past, Present & Future
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What can the Cretaceous tell us about our climate?

What can the Cretaceous tell us about our climate?

The Cretaceous The Cretaceous period features a particularly interesting climatic episode in the Earth’s geological history. It follows the Jurassic Period, better known as the time the dinosaurs inhabited Earth and spanned the period between 145.5 and 65.5 million years ago. The Cretaceous is the last period of the Mesozoic Era, which ends with a well-known mass extinction event. At the end of th ...[Read More]

Levoglucosan, the witness of past fires

Levoglucosan, the witness of past fires

Name of proxy Levoglucosan Type of record Biomass burning Paleoenvironment Lake and marine sediments and ice cores Period of time investigated Present to approximately 130,000 years ago How does it work? Levoglucosan is a molecule that is exclusively formed during the combustion of vegetation at low-temperature. It is therefore considered to be a source-specific tracer for biomass burning. During ...[Read More]

Pollen, more than forests’ story-tellers

Pollen, more than forests’ story-tellers

Name of proxy Sporomorphs (pollen grains and fern spores) Type of record Biostratigraphy and Geochronology markers, Vegetation dynamics Paleoenvironment Terrestrial environment Period of time investigated Present to 360 million years How does it work? The sporomorphs (pollen grains and fern spores) are cells produced by plants involved in the reproduction. They are microscopic (less than a fifth o ...[Read More]

How to reconstruct past climates from water stable isotopes in Polar ice cores ?

How to reconstruct past climates from water stable isotopes in Polar ice cores ?

Ice cores are a favored archive to study past climates, because they provide a number of indications on the history of the climate and of the atmospheric composition. Among these, water stable isotopes are considered as a very reliable temperature proxy. Yet, their interpretation is sometimes more complicated than a simple one-to-one correspondence with local temperature and requires intercomparis ...[Read More]