BG
Biogeosciences

early career scientists

What more can we do as climate scientists to address climate change?

Earth-artist-impression

  Fig 1 — Artist impression of Earth (source: Unsplash, Elena Mozhvilo)   The much anticipated COP26 — even more so because of its postponement — is now already a few months behind us. There has been a lot of attention in the media, including on the BG blog. We have seen mixed reactions following the final statement at COP26: ranging from disappointment about lack of ambition to realism ...[Read More]

Meet Adina Paytan- Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal winner 2022

Dr Adina Paytan's research group in a field

We spoke to Dr. Adina Paytan, Research Scientist at the Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz and Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal winner for 2022. The Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal is awarded annually by the Biogeosciences division to those who make an exceptional contribution to biogeosciences. Can you tell us a bit about your background and how your career pr ...[Read More]

Meet Ana Bastos, the Outstanding Early Career Scientist awardee of the Biogeosciences Division!

Meet Ana Bastos, the Outstanding Early Career Scientist awardee of the Biogeosciences Division!

This year, Ana Bastos has received the Outstanding Early-career scientist award of the Biogeosciences Division. The BG team wants to truly congratulate them on this achievement! In this interview, we would like to know a bit more about their research and career, seeking inspiration for the young generation of biogeoscientists. Could you explain a bit about yourself and what made you choose a caree ...[Read More]

Biogeosciences in the blue zone- COP26.

COP26 plenary room

Our Editor, Ben Fisher, writes about his experience as an observer at COP26 and the representation of biogeosciences in the negotiation area.  I was extremely fortunate to have the opportunity attend the second week of COP26 as a delegate of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). Having been a rather last minute addition to the attendance list (I found out I’d got credentials ...[Read More]

From the forest to the ocean – get to know the new ECS representative team of the Biogeosciences division!

From the forest to the ocean – get to know the new ECS representative team of the Biogeosciences division!

The Biogeosciences division is among the most diverse in the EGU, from marine and terrestrial sciences to extraterrestrial studies and remote sensing applications. Therefore, there is a need of a team of ECS representatives covering a wide range of research interests and topics. Do you want to know them?     Elisabet Martínez-Sancho is a postdoctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Insti ...[Read More]

High-resolution biogeochemistry: Taking snapshots of past climate using mollusk shells

High-resolution biogeochemistry: Taking snapshots of past climate using mollusk shells

This is a solicited blogpost written by Niels de Winter. Now that the effects of rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions are starting to affect our everyday lives, accurate reconstructions of past climates become more and more relevant. These reconstructions help us to improve climate models used to project future global warming scenarios which in turn inform policy makers. The further we look back in ...[Read More]

Dating mineral phases in geological remnants of early life

Dating mineral phases in geological remnants of early life

This is a solicited blogpost written by Sebastian Viehmann. The Mesoarchean Strelley Pool Formation in the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) hosts one of the oldest geological remnants of life on Earth. These silicified stromatolitic carbonates show diverse morphologies and formed on a shallow marine carbonate platform 3.35 billion years ago (Ga; Figures 1 and 2). After a long-standing debate abo ...[Read More]

Phosphorus-cycle perturbations and environmental disturbances 380–360 million years ago

Phosphorus-cycle perturbations and environmental disturbances 380–360 million years ago

This is a solicited blogpost written by Lawrence Percival, who will also present his work on the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 as part of session SSP2.1 of the upcoming EGU GA.   The increasing concern regarding 21st climate change and environmental disturbance has led to a renewed focus on similar episodes of global crisis through Earth’s history. During the Late Devonian Period, 380–360 million ye ...[Read More]

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Investigation of methane emissions in marine systems

Ever wondered how we can measure methane emssions from the seafloor ? And ever wanted to steer a mini submarine remotely operating vehicle (ROV)? Well here´s your chance! Have look at this blog post on analyzing methane emissions using ROVs and you´re ready to embark!    The goal is to determine when the gas leak started and how the fluid flow systems work. With our research, we can contribut ...[Read More]

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

What´s in your fieldbag? Part 1: measuring freshwater carbon fluxes in the Artic

This bag belongs to Joshua Dean, Postdoc, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Field Work location Far Eastern Siberian Arctic: Kytalyk Nature Reserve. Duration of field work 2 weeks plus 3 days travel either side. Items in the bag Detecto Pak-Infrared (DP-IR) gas analyser [borrowed from colleagues, protect at all costs] EGM4 CO2 gas analyser [borrowed from another department, protect at all costs] water ...[Read More]