Geology for Global Development

GfGD General

GfGD Network of Professionals

Geology for Global Development (GfGD) is a registered charity, working to mobilise and reshape the geoscience community to help deliver the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

To support this mission, a network of professionals is being established, aiming to promote GfGD’s vision and objectives, facilitate knowledge sharing and catalyse discussion around geoscience-for-development themes, and support geoscientists in the network to help deliver the SDGs. This group will ensure stronger connections between GfGD and professionals from the public and private sector, research and NGOs, whilst providing additional support to those currently involved in GfGD (predominantly university students).

Professional geoscientists are often placed in a unique position at the interface between government, society and industry. The collective experience, knowledge and insights of professionals has huge potential to make a real and constructive contribution to sustainable development. Furthermore, their engagement can help to inspire and equip early career geoscientists to contribute to sustainable development objectives.

Examples of the types of activity that we would like the GfGD Network of Professionals to partake in, include:

  • Empowering early career geoscientists, mentoring them through the first phases of their career, encouraging knowledge sharing and ideas generation;
  • Communication between GfGD university groups and those employed in different sectors, demonstrating and promoting the positive contributions to sustainable development that can be made throughout diverse geoscience careers;
  • Offering presentations to colleagues, universities and local groups to both promote the work of GfGD and to share stories of geoscientists contributing to sustainable development;
  • Contributing to GfGD international projects, by liaising with partner organisations and project stakeholders, offering a professional perspective;
  • Supporting the work of GfGD through engaging in fundraising;
  • Contributing professional experiences to the GfGD blog, newsletters, conferences and workshops to reach a wider audience; and
  • Distributing relevant conferences, talks, training opportunities, jobs and other opportunities to the wider GfGD network.

To register your interest please complete this form, or contact Allie Mitchell with questions.

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Event Report: UN Science, Technology and Innovation Forum 2019

In May 2019, we led an international delegation of early-career Earth scientists to the UN Forum on Science, Technology, and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals.

Download our full event report here.

The annual UN Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) aims to facilitate interactions, networks and partnerships to identify and examine needs and gaps in technologies, scientific cooperation, innovation and capacity-building to support the SDGs. The forum is attended by member states (official national representatives), civil society, the private sector, the scientific community, and United Nations entities (e.g., UNESCO, UN Water).

The 2019 Forum theme was ‘science, technology and innovation for ensuring inclusiveness and equality’, exploring SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (tackling climate change), and 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).

Through engaging, we hoped to increase the visibility of the Earth science community in sustainable development discussions, championing the importance of understanding the natural environment, enhancing public understanding of Earth systems and resources, and building strong professional communities of Earth and environmental scientists. We did this by coordinating and leading an international delegation of early-career Earth scientists, working in diverse contexts (e.g., Central Asia and Latin America). Together we helped to draft formal interventions delivered during plenary sessions, and organised a side event on Earth and Environmental Science Education for Sustainable Development.

We are grateful to the International Union of Geological Sciences and IUGS/UNESCO International Geoscience Programme Project 685 for their support.

 

GfGD Annual Report 2018

Our 2018 Annual Report highlights our achievements last year, how these link with our strategy, and presents an overview of our finances.

We had many exciting opportunities in 2018 to influence the global sustainable development agenda and represent geoscience in places where it otherwise would not have been included. For example, we contributed a commissioned paper to the 2nd International Commission on Education for Sustainable Development Practice Report outlining how geoscience graduates can be integrated into sustainability programmes. We also attended the 3rd UN Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs at the UN Headquarters in New York, advocating for the importance of geoscience in dialogue about cities, energy, water, and responsible production and consumption.

Our 6th Annual Conference focused on water and sustainable development and was opened by Lord Ian Duncan, the UK Government Minister for Scotland and Northern Ireland. Building on this theme, we launched a new international programme, partnering with The Eleanor Foundation to evaluate the sustainability of water programmes in Tanzania. We generated a small surplus in 2018, allowing us to commit to this new project.

We published a briefing note with other UK partners to demonstrate how geoscience is critical to the SDGs, and continued to invest in our network of University Groups around the UK that collectively engage hundreds of geoscience students through talks, humanitarian and development mapathons, conference visits and fundraising activities.

Download our 2018 Annual Report to read more.
You can access all of our Annual Reports on our website.

Water and Sustainable Development – 6th GfGD Annual Conference Event Report

Water and Sustainable Development – 6th GfGD Annual Conference Event Report

Understanding, managing and protecting water resources is critical to the delivery of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (e.g., education, water and sanitation, healthy oceans, zero hunger, good health, gender equality, energy, industry, and biodiversity). Increasing urbanisation, industrialisation, and climate change, however, are increasing pressure on water supplies and reducing water quality. Our 6th Annual Conference explored the role of geoscientists in managing conflicting demands for water, ensuring that the needs of the poorest are met while enhancing the health of ecosystems. We recently published a full event report online, and here we share some of the highlights.

Our Annual Conference is a highlight for many involved in the work of Geology for Global Development, bringing together people from across the UK and beyond to explore how geoscientists can contribute to sustainable development. This year approximately 120 attendees gathered at the Geological Society of London to talk about all things water, Sustainable Development Goals and geoscience.

The conference was opened by Lord Duncan of Springbank (UK Government Minister for Scotland and Northern Ireland, and a fellow geoscientist). Lord Duncan gave a passionate description of the important links between politics, geology and sustainable development. Another distinguished guest was Benedicto Hosea, visiting the UK from Tanzania and working closely with the Tanzania Development Trust. Benedicto gave us an insight into water resources in Tanzania, and the realities of implementing projects and taking practical action to improve water provision.

Our keynote lecture was delivered by Professor Bob Kalin from the University of Strathclyde, who gave us an overview of the interactions between water, geoscience and human impacts – and why it is important that geoscientists engage in the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals. You can find a recording of a similar talk Professor Kalin presented at a TedX event.

The first panel discussion of the day focused on management, with insight from industry, academia and the Overseas Development Institute. We discussed the challenges involved in listening to and considering many stakeholders, the management of transnational aquifers and how best to enforce policy – then attempted to come with some solutions to these challenges. Our event report includes links to key reading suggested by our panellists.

Water contamination is a significant environmental issue in many countries at all stages of development.  We heard about research into salinization and arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh. Mike Webster, head of WasteAid (check them out here) gave a different perspective on water contamination, talking about the work the charity has done in improving solid waste collection, thereby improving drainage and water quality.

Probably the most hectic, yet fun part of the conference was the UN style activity – we split up into groups representing different stakeholders and came up with a research and innovation statement relating to water and the SDGs.

We were also joined by The Eleanor Foundation, a charity working in Tanzania to provide access to safe, clean water provision to communities through pump installation and education programmes. It was so inspiring to hear about a charity that has undertaken effective work in ensuring the sustainable supply of water to communities, and made a real difference in improving lives – it is estimated that the Eleanor Foundation has improved access to water to over 250,000 people. In 2019, GfGD will be supporting the work of The Eleanor Foundation, helping to deliver SDG 6 in Tanzania. We will be using surplus income from our conference, together with other funds, to facilitate an evaluation of The Eleanor Foundation’s water programme. This will generate recommendations for The Eleanor Foundation team to ensure long-term impact and sustainability.

In true GSL conference style, we finished the conference with a reception in the library, giving us all the chance to chat about the conference and meet people sharing an interest in geoscience and development (of course admiring William Smith’s geological map!). I think it would be fair to say that a fun and interesting day was had by all, and I left feeling excited by the number of geoscientists I met that all share enthusiasm for the role that geoscientists have in helping to achieve the SDGs.

The 7th GfGD Annual Conference will be on Friday 15th November 2019, hosted again by the Geological Society of London. Please do save the date, and we hope to see you there!

Laura Hunt is a member of the GfGD Executive Team, and a PhD Student at the University of Nottingham and the British Geological Survey.