Geology for Global Development
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Dr Joel C. Gill

Joel is the Founder/Director of Geology for Global Development (@Geo_Dev) an organisation working to support geologists to make a sustainable contribution to the fight against global poverty. He is an interdisciplinary researcher, with a PhD in geography (natural hazards), and research interests in multi-hazard frameworks, disaster risk reduction, rural water projects, and sustainable development. This work has taken him to Chile, China, Guatemala, India, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda. Joel is currently based at the British Geological Survey, and tweets at @JoelCGill.

New Paper: Interconnected Geoscience for International Development

A new paper published in Episodes: The Journal of International Geoscience highlights the importance of geoscience in tackling complex development challenges, and the need for new approaches to overcome barriers preventing greater application of geoscience within development. ‘Interconnected geoscience for international development‘, written by Professor Michael Petterson of Auckland University of Technology (New Zealand) sets out a conceptual model that combines geoscience expertise with an understanding of developmental situations, conditions, and context. 

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction require geoscientists from across all sectors and sub-disciplines to get involved, improve access to their science, and participate in effective and respectful capacity building and knowledge exchange (read more here). In this new article, Petterson (2019) reflects on his experiences as a geoscientist working in two sharply contrasting development contexts (the Solomon Islands and Afghanistan) to synthesise key learning. With one funding cycle starting as another comes to an end, taking time to reflect on and share lessons learned is sadly not always typical. As the SDGs and a renewed focus on science-for-development provide geoscientists with greater opportunities to engage in international development, this reflection is of great importance.

 

One factor discussed by Petterson (2019) is the importance of both understanding and valuing situational context (including local world views), and using this to enrich the design and implementation of projects. Another is the importance of inclusivity, building strong networks and actively including local wisdom. While good technical geoscience knowledge and skills are greatly needed in development programmes, these must be complement by a suite of other skills (often missing from the traditional education of geoscientists). Recognising this, and helping geoscientists to build these skills, is central to the work of Geology for Global Development.

Petterson (2019) notes: “Developmental setting/conditions are the foundation: these will guide how the geoscience is to be optimally applied. Projects are devised with development goals in mind and outputs/services tailored to meet the needs of policy makers and practitioners. Local affected communities must be at the heart of project outcome design. An interconnected approach places importance on issues such as inclusivity, environment and local focus, indigenous and non-conformist world-views, valuing and incorporating traditional knowledge, the possibilities of citizen-science and geoscientist-community connections/relations. The interconnected approach adopts the equal and respectful inclusive approach from the earliest stages of programme conception and development. Interconnected geoscience approaches, provide a conceptual model for the possibilities of science + social science + community + local world views, to feed into policy and communal acceptance of policy. An interconnected geoscience approach stands a better chance of addressing complex, regional and global development issues, including planetary health and global climate change. The approach improves the probability of practitioners using research results, and researchers undertaking research that addresses the highest level needs of development.”

Read the whole article (open access) here.

GfGD Network of Professionals

Geology for Global Development (GfGD) is a registered charity, working to mobilise and reshape the geoscience community to help deliver the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

To support this mission, a network of professionals is being established, aiming to promote GfGD’s vision and objectives, facilitate knowledge sharing and catalyse discussion around geoscience-for-development themes, and support geoscientists in the network to help deliver the SDGs. This group will ensure stronger connections between GfGD and professionals from the public and private sector, research and NGOs, whilst providing additional support to those currently involved in GfGD (predominantly university students).

Professional geoscientists are often placed in a unique position at the interface between government, society and industry. The collective experience, knowledge and insights of professionals has huge potential to make a real and constructive contribution to sustainable development. Furthermore, their engagement can help to inspire and equip early career geoscientists to contribute to sustainable development objectives.

Examples of the types of activity that we would like the GfGD Network of Professionals to partake in, include:

  • Empowering early career geoscientists, mentoring them through the first phases of their career, encouraging knowledge sharing and ideas generation;
  • Communication between GfGD university groups and those employed in different sectors, demonstrating and promoting the positive contributions to sustainable development that can be made throughout diverse geoscience careers;
  • Offering presentations to colleagues, universities and local groups to both promote the work of GfGD and to share stories of geoscientists contributing to sustainable development;
  • Contributing to GfGD international projects, by liaising with partner organisations and project stakeholders, offering a professional perspective;
  • Supporting the work of GfGD through engaging in fundraising;
  • Contributing professional experiences to the GfGD blog, newsletters, conferences and workshops to reach a wider audience; and
  • Distributing relevant conferences, talks, training opportunities, jobs and other opportunities to the wider GfGD network.

To register your interest please complete this form, or contact Allie Mitchell with questions.

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Event Report: UN Science, Technology and Innovation Forum 2019

In May 2019, we led an international delegation of early-career Earth scientists to the UN Forum on Science, Technology, and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals.

Download our full event report here.

The annual UN Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) aims to facilitate interactions, networks and partnerships to identify and examine needs and gaps in technologies, scientific cooperation, innovation and capacity-building to support the SDGs. The forum is attended by member states (official national representatives), civil society, the private sector, the scientific community, and United Nations entities (e.g., UNESCO, UN Water).

The 2019 Forum theme was ‘science, technology and innovation for ensuring inclusiveness and equality’, exploring SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (tackling climate change), and 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).

Through engaging, we hoped to increase the visibility of the Earth science community in sustainable development discussions, championing the importance of understanding the natural environment, enhancing public understanding of Earth systems and resources, and building strong professional communities of Earth and environmental scientists. We did this by coordinating and leading an international delegation of early-career Earth scientists, working in diverse contexts (e.g., Central Asia and Latin America). Together we helped to draft formal interventions delivered during plenary sessions, and organised a side event on Earth and Environmental Science Education for Sustainable Development.

We are grateful to the International Union of Geological Sciences and IUGS/UNESCO International Geoscience Programme Project 685 for their support.

 

GfGD Annual Report 2018

Our 2018 Annual Report highlights our achievements last year, how these link with our strategy, and presents an overview of our finances.

We had many exciting opportunities in 2018 to influence the global sustainable development agenda and represent geoscience in places where it otherwise would not have been included. For example, we contributed a commissioned paper to the 2nd International Commission on Education for Sustainable Development Practice Report outlining how geoscience graduates can be integrated into sustainability programmes. We also attended the 3rd UN Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs at the UN Headquarters in New York, advocating for the importance of geoscience in dialogue about cities, energy, water, and responsible production and consumption.

Our 6th Annual Conference focused on water and sustainable development and was opened by Lord Ian Duncan, the UK Government Minister for Scotland and Northern Ireland. Building on this theme, we launched a new international programme, partnering with The Eleanor Foundation to evaluate the sustainability of water programmes in Tanzania. We generated a small surplus in 2018, allowing us to commit to this new project.

We published a briefing note with other UK partners to demonstrate how geoscience is critical to the SDGs, and continued to invest in our network of University Groups around the UK that collectively engage hundreds of geoscience students through talks, humanitarian and development mapathons, conference visits and fundraising activities.

Download our 2018 Annual Report to read more.
You can access all of our Annual Reports on our website.