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EGU Guest blogger

This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo On Monday: Graduate life – keep going, don’t give up

Imaggeo On Monday: Graduate life – keep going, don’t give up

The Algarve barrier island system in southern Portugal: the land is sinking due to deltaic sediment compaction and urbanization, and the sea water level is rising due to global warming. Photo by Makan A. Karegar, description as shown on imaggeo.egu.eu.   Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Observation of the Stars

Imaggeo On Monday: Observation of the Stars

TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) is located at an altitude of 2500 m, on the top of Bakirlitepe mountain in Saklikent region of the city of Antalya which is located on the Mediterranian coast of Turkey. Besides research and training activities, TUG feels the responsibility of creating awareness in astronomy and space sciences. In this context, TUG regularly organizes a yearly star fest at Saklik ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Welcome aboard Planet Earth

Imaggeo On Monday: Welcome aboard Planet Earth

The large suspended globe in the foreground and a suspended pathway in the background. The composition gives an impression that the museum visitors are entering into the Earth, perhaps even boarding an Earthly spaceship. Photo taken at Miraikan – the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo, Japan. At the moment the photo was taken the projection shows a satellite image of ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Rock flour in suspension in Lake Louise

Imaggeo On Monday: Rock flour in suspension in Lake Louise

The waters of Lake Lousie in the Canadian Rockies are cold and fresh, supplied direct from the glaciers nestled in the mountains, but as the water from the glacier melts it carries with it tiny particles of rock dust that are also transported into the lake. As you can see in this image, the particulate rock matter, held in suspension in the lake, creates this beautiful pale turquoise colour, that ...[Read More]