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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo On Monday: Lahar in the jungle, Mexico

Imaggeo On Monday: Lahar in the jungle, Mexico

Volcán de Colima currently is the most active volcano in Mexico where many rain-induced lahars occur every year. La Lumbre ravine is the ephemeral channel that drains the west-southwestern slopes of the volcano. In 2016, while Volcán de Colima experienced a prolonged explosive phase, several lahars were documented in this channel. One of them is shown in his picture, taken on August 13, 2016, du ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Blue Olivine in an unusual basalt

Imaggeo On Monday: Blue Olivine in an unusual basalt

Blue Olivine set in a matrix of pyroxene, magnetite and plagioclase in a basalt collected by the photographer, Bernardo Cesare, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, Israel. Polarized light photomicrograph. Crossed polarizers and red tint plate. Width c. 2.7 mm. Who may have been throwing this stone a couple millennia ago?   Description by Bernardo Cesare, after the description on imaggeo.egu.e ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Hedenbergite – Ilvaite skarn, Calamita, Island of Elba

Imaggeo On Monday: Hedenbergite – Ilvaite skarn, Calamita, Island of Elba

In this photo taken on the Isle of Elba in Italy you can see several radiating crystals of greenish Hedenbergite, inter-grown with blackish coloured Ilvaite in skarn bodies. Skarn is an unique formation that formed as a result of the interaction between geothermal fluids and the host rock. In this case the geothermal fluids come from the Late Miocene Porto Azzurro monzogranite, and Mesozoic marble ...[Read More]

Imaggeo On Monday: Emoji from meteorites; impact spherule

Imaggeo On Monday: Emoji from meteorites; impact spherule

This is a crossed polarized light photomicrograph of an impact spherule; a small mineralisation made when a meteorite hits the Earth and melts the rock at the point of impact, from Barberton Greenstone Belt, in South Africa. These spherules are the only remnants of Early Earth’s meteorite impact history, from between of 3.2 and 3.5 billion years ago. In this photo you can see the K-feldspar ...[Read More]