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This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer to pitch your idea.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Rocks weather, soil takes form

Imaggeo on Mondays: Rocks weather, soil takes form

This image depicts the soil formation, that is weathering of rock. Soil is actually formed by weathering of rock by physical, chemical and biological methods. This image depicts physical and biological weathering. Physical weathering by the action of temperature and biological weathering by the growth of some species of grass through the cracks. Image clicked from Trivandrum district of Kerala, In ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: Subsurface meteorolgy in Iceland

Imaggeo on Mondays: Subsurface meteorolgy in Iceland

With a total length of about 2 km, the Surdsellir lava cave is part of the Hallmundarhraun lava field in western Iceland. The caves ceiling is partly broken in, forming entrances and windows towards the earths surface. On this day of typically Icelandic weather, meteorological conditions changed quickly between sun, clouds, rain and wind. While walking through the cave during a rain shower, the su ...[Read More]

Geosciences Column: Taking a Breath of the Wild – are geoscientists more effective than non-geoscientists in determining whether video game world landscapes are realistic?

Geosciences Column: Taking a Breath of the Wild – are geoscientists more effective than non-geoscientists in determining whether video game world landscapes are realistic?

For years, geoscientists have been both fascinated and perplexed by the beautiful (yet often inaccurate) landscapes present in several video games. But are people with a geoscientific education better at telling ‘fake’ natural features from real ones? Rolf Hut, an assistant professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, and his colleagues sought to answer this question in a new st ...[Read More]

Imaggeo on Mondays: The glacier surviving climate change

Imaggeo on Mondays: The glacier surviving climate change

Human impacts on the climate are nowadays clearly discernible, and the changes to our climate that previously happened in geologic time scales are currently happening during the span of a human lifetime. Our planet is warming and temperature today is now more than 1°C higher than it was in the pre-industrial world and rises by about 0.15-0.2°C on average each decade. The dramatic effects of this r ...[Read More]