GeoLog

GeoCinema Online: Trials and tribulations of field work.

Field work is not without its trials and tribulations, getting there, for instance can be an adventure in itself. Once you arrive you can expect long days, sandwiches for lunch and frustration at losing your way or equipment not working as you expect it to. Despite all of that, one of the primary draws of the geosciences is being able to spend time in the great outdoors. In the fourth instalment of GeoCinema there is something for everyone as we track scientist living in Antarctica, undergraduates trying to map a 15km2  area in Greenland and a PhD student who spends her time high up in the tree canopy. Grab a drink and get comfortable, the show is about to begin.

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica

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A short music video contains sequences of science in action which captures a little of how it feels to travel to and work in Antarctica.

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station

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Living in Antarctica is no mean feat, especially whilst attempting to carry out lengthy field seasons, in fact, to some it might seem utter madness. However, the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Research Station, a new facility to support world-leading science by offering living quarters as well as research facilities, has been built on the icy landscape.

An Undergraduate Mapping Project
This educational film follows 4 Oxford University undergraduates as they complete their mapping projects and describes the methodology used and experiences gained on the trip. It includes footage from Greenland, photographs and animated diagrams, making geology accessible to people with little knowledge of the subject. The main goal of the film is to inspire secondary school students to undertake fieldwork and study Earth Sciences.

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Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy.

Published research with its detailed graphs, elaborate methodologies and analysis doesn’t provide a means to showcase all the work that goes on behind the scenes. In this film a researcher showcases the first two years of her PhD, spent up high in the canopy of the Amazon rainforest.

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Have you missed any of the series so far? Catch up with space science here or learn about carbon capture and storage instead.

Stay tuned to the blog for more films!

Credits

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica: Linda Capper, http://youtu.be/8CmKwXXPkgg

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station: Linda Capper, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDIi7rP_WBA

An Undergraduate Mapping Project: Eleni Wood, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd5H-14WLzA

Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy: Cecilia Chavana-Bryant, http://vimeo.com/46676651.

Laura Roberts Artal is the Outreach and Dissemination Manager at The Water Innovation Hub (University of Sheffield). Laura also volunteers as the Associate Director of Communications for Geology for Global Development. She has also held a role in industry as Marketing Manager for PDS Ava (part of PDS Group). Laura was the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union from the summer of 2014 to the end of 2017. Laura is a geologist by training and holds a PhD in palaeomagnetism from the University of Liverpool. She tweets at @LauRob85.


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