GeoLog

Outreach

Introducing EGU’s new Communications Officer!

Introducing EGU’s new Communications Officer!

Meet the newest member of EGU’s communications team, Olivia Trani! Olivia joined the EGU office in February and since then has been managing GeoLog and the EGU blog network, running our social media channels, and developing EGU networking activities for early career scientists.

Hello from the EGU Executive Office! I have been working as the new EGU Communications Officer for the past few months (you may have seen me at the 2018 General Assembly), but I would like to take the time to officially introduce myself.

I am originally from the United States where I completed my bachelor’s in Biology and Environmental Science at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. As an undergraduate, I had many great research experiences, such as studying crabs and terrapins by canoe in the swamps of Virginia, hunting for American chestnuts in Maine’s hardwood forests, and examining microscopic fungi in the lab.

I then obtained a master’s in Science Journalism from Boston University, and following graduation, I had the opportunity to intern as a science writer for both Inside Science and the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Washington D.C.

A couple of months ago, I jumped over the Atlantic to join the EGU office team in Munich, and since then I have been managing EGU’s network of blogs and social media channels as well as organising initiatives for early career scientists. I also organised events geared towards science communication and early career scientists at the 2018 General Assembly. To do all this, I’ve been working closely with the EGU Media and Communications Manager, Bárbara Ferreira, and the EGU’s dedicated team of early career scientist representatives. I am very excited to continue sharing science here at the EGU office and collaborate with the EGU community!

Feel free to contact me at networking@egu.eu if you have any questions about EGU’s communication outlets or our early career scientist network. I look forward to hearing from you!

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Competition 2018!

The selection committee received over 600 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants at the 2018 General Assembly have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  of the conference and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to 2018’s fantastic photographers!

 

Foehn clouds in Patagonia,’ by Christoph Mayr (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A stationary cloud formed on the lee side of Mount Fitzroy. It evolved from a lenticular cloud (Altocumulus lenticularis) and turned into a funnel-shaped cloud during sunset when the photo was taken.

 

Jebel Bayda (White Mountain),’ by Luigi Vigliotti (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). An aerial view of the Jebel Bayda, a white volcano created by silica-rich lava (comendite) in the Khaybar region. The flank of the volcano was shaped by rain in the region during the first half of the Holocene.

 

Remains of a former ocean floor,’ by Jana Eichel (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). These limestone boulders characterise the landscape of Castle Hill Basin in New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The Pacific Plate collided with the Australian Plate during the Kaikoura Orogeny 25 million years ago, giving birth not only to the Southern Alps but also lifting up thick limestone beds formed in shallow ocean water.

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Short courses at EGU 2018

Short courses at EGU 2018

At this year’s General Assembly there are loads of short courses to choose from for broadening your expertise. You can supercharge your scientific skills, broaden your base in science communication and pick up tips on how to boost your career – be it in academia or outside. There is also a course aimed at making your time at the conference easier – be sure to take part, especially if it is your first time! And, if you do attend the short courses, don’t forget to share your experience with other conference participants on social media using the dedicated hashtag: #EGU18SC. Here’s a small selection of what’s in store at EGU 2018:

Supercharge your science – new techniques and dealing with data

Tips and tricks to boost your career

Being able to secure your own funding for research is key to a successful academic career and will give you important skills applicable to industry jobs too, so why not check out these three grant writing courses?

A selection of short courses focused on career development and improving your chances of landing your dream job. (Photo by Nick Youngson, distributed via Blue Diamond Gallery)

Additionally, you can also improve the chances of landing your dream job by attending these career development sessions.

You can also gain very useful insight from those who have done it before, so why not take part in your Division’s ‘Meet the masters’ session? Here you’ll be able to meet experts in the field who can give you tips on how to get the most out of your career.

Science communication skills

With a growing emphasis on engaging the public with science and research, we have many workshops designed to develop your communication skills.

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 8 to 13 April. Check out the full session programme, for a complete list of short courses available, on the General Assembly website.