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Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology
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Guilhem Douillet

Guilhem Amin Douillet works as a physical sedimentologist at the University of Bern (Switzerland). He is interested in currents and how they shape bedforms. He is currently studying bedforms created by pyroclastic density currents and tempestites from the swiss molasse basin. These main themes bring him to compare his field samples with other types of environments from turbidity currents, supercritical flows, wind driven transport and highly loaded rivers. He has been involved as a SSP sedimentology science officer since 2012, and was the SSP ECS representative from 2013 to 2016.

Architecture and sediments, heritage and future

As geoscientists in Europe, we should consider ourselves to be very lucky to have a rich architectural heritage. The first insights we gain about the geology of an area can be read in beautiful historic buildings. For centuries, construction and architecture have been driven by two constraints: adapt to the local environment, and use locally available materials. Heritage buildings thus represent v ...[Read More]

EGU goes greener, let’s go greener to EGU

For those in a rush, here is the conclusion already: EGU is doing great efforts to become more environmentally friendly, but the huge issue of any conference lies in one aspect: participants flying there… Could we, participants, rush into the train next year? I would not have realized all the evolutions of this year’s EGU2019 General Assembly if they had not been told to me. And that w ...[Read More]

Glacial grooves from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (Québec, Canada)

These impressive glacial grooves observed along the North Shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Québec, Canada) were carved into the crystalline bedrock by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The grooves mark the basement of a complex sedimentary system known as the Tadoussac Delta, lying at the mouth of the Saguenay Fjord and intimately tied to the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene deglaciation of the area. The ...[Read More]

EGU’s lost strata… what happens to conference carpets?

Being a stratigrapher or not, there’s one stratum you have all trod upon if you ever went to the General Assembly (GA), without probably noticing it. The uppermost unit of EGU’s GA floor, a ca. 5 mm thick layer with a soft rubbery texture and peculiar light-grey colour, outcropping over the whole poster halls: Carpet! Yes, the focus of this post is the carpet draping the GA’s floor wit ...[Read More]