SM
Seismology

Seismology

AGU … are your presentations ready?

Many European Earth and space scientists who attend the annual American Geophysical Union Fall meeting are probably glued to their computers right now finishing off their oral or poster presentations. It amazes me how – from personal experience – it is always at the very last week (or day) that some scientific breakthrough is made. But that is just the beginning.

AGU registration

AGU registration

For Europeans attending AGU it could be a ‘stressful‘ experience. After the sigh of relief that you have something interesting to present you need to have a look at the abstract you had submitted months ago and see how you will combine what you had written back then with what you have just discovered, make (nice) figures, and put everything together. All has to be done in time to go for a few rounds of festive drinks with your peers who you would not see until mid-January the next year, buy some season gifts for loved ones, close-off your luggage, grab your passport, and head to the airport all set for the long-haul, twelve-hour flight! Once there you need to adjust to the time difference and wait until the time of your 15 minutes show-case.

Traveling back could be a nightmare if mother nature decides to throw a blanket of snow on the northern hemisphere. Getting stuck in the US is the last thing on everyone’s mind but it is a possible nightmare! Starting right from finding an alternative flight, sleeping at the airport because nearby hotels are fully booked, and hoping your return flight is not diverted mid-flight due to an airport closure back home.

If you may think that all this is an exaggeration, that was a personal experience account. Nonetheless it is worth all the adventure; sharing your work with the community and catching up with friends and colleagues from the US. AGU is a great experience and participation is recommended as much as is the EGU General Assembly.

Safe flights to all of those going to AGU !

Movember seismologists

Movember is the new November when men grow and proudly show their defining moustaches. Have you grown your moustache? I have done so for the last month as evident in the introductory vid. Now, that I am close to return to my smooth-shaven chin and upper lips, I was wondering which famous seismologists had nice fluffy moustaches. I headed on to Googling some portraits. Here is what I came across:

Robert Mallet

Robert Mallet

Robert Mallett: Ireland’s ‘father of seismology’

John Milne

John Milne

John Milne: Famous for inventing the horizontal pendulum seismograph.

It seems that having a moustache was the trend a century ago, irrespective of the shape and style; from “Handlebar” to “Horseshoe”, “Imperial” and “Mexican” (check out wikipedia). Look at this Meeting of world seismologists at the California Institute of Technology, Seismological Laboratory in 1929.

Meeting of world seismologists at the California Institute of Technology, Seismological Laboratory in 1929.

Meeting of world seismologists at the California Institute of Technology, Seismological Laboratory in 1929.

Andria Mohorovicic

Andria Mohorovicic

My favourite Mo Bro is none other than Andrija Mohoroviči, known for the Mohorovičić discontinuity and is considered a founder of modern seismology. That’s right, if you want to portray yourself as a modern seismologist he is your moustache model man.

29th November: EGU deadline for Support Applications

Are you planning on attending and presenting your work at the next EGU in 2014? Do you know you might benefit from financial support that may include a waiver of the registration fee, a refund of the Abstract Processing Charge, and support for travel expenditures? You can find all the information here: http://www.egu.eu/young-scientists/financial-support.

If you think you are entitled for such support don’t be shy to apply. But, in order to be eligible you should submit an abstract for an oral or poster presentation, on which you are first author, by 29th November 2013! Programme groups and session are online; these are the proposed seismology sessions: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/sessionprogramme/SM

The first post

Hi all,

Matthew

Welcome to the European Geosciences Union young seismologist blog – Seismoblog. This is a new website dedicated to the young researchers within the EGU Seismology Division. It is my honour to be the Young Scientist Representative within this division for the next couple of months. Following discussions with the President of the Seismology Division, Charlotte Krawczyk, we have decided to set up this blog to promote the talents of young seismologist and to serve as a gateway for students to communicate with the division.

I would like to introduce myself briefly. I am Matthew Agius, 31 years old, and hail from the island of Malta. I have just finished my Ph.D. studies I undertook at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. My studies there focused about the structure and dynamics of the lithosphere beneath Tibet using seismic surface-wave analysis.

Till next post, take care.Have a look at the different sections available on this website and please consider registering.

Matthew