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Matthew Agius

Matthew Agius is a recent PhD graduate from the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies in Ireland and is now doing research at the University of Southampton (National Oceanography Centre). His research focuses on the dynamics of the lithosphere beneath Tibet, the Central Mediterranean, and the Pacific Ocean. Matthew’s role as a young scientist representative is to promote the efforts done by young researchers and to engage in discussions that concern seismology students. You can reach Matthew via e-mail at matthew.agius@soton.ac.uk.

EGU Abstract Submission Season

EGU Abstract Submission Season

A new season just started – EGU 2017 abstract submission season! (http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/sessionprogramme). Since the 20th of October you can submit your abstracts to one or more of the many seismology sessions. Believe it or not but we counted 75 sessions that are related to seismology. Wow! We are all very excited to scroll through the programme and daydream about the talks we will hear and posters we will see in April next year.

We all know that in general abstract submission is sometimes more of a last minute thing, but being a bit earlier this time might have some advantages. Firstly, you can enjoy the time before and after Christmas without any abstract writing stress. And secondly, which might be even better, you can apply for financial support for the conference if you submit by the 1st of Dec (http://egu2017.eu/financial_support.html). Whatever you plan on doing, submitting early or at the last second, it is a good idea to already have a look now at the programme to get an idea what EGU has to offer in 2017.

Reading all 75 session abstracts might take a while, so better hurry and get a head start on the session discovery. This is especially true if your abstract fits into more than one session. The SM sessions are divided into 10 different groups:

  • SM1 – General seismology sessions
  • SM2 – Earthquake sources
  • SM3 – Engineering seismology & probabilistic seismic hazard
  • SM4 – Seismic imaging across scales (from near-surface to global scale, including methodological developments)
  • SM5 – Seismic instrumentation & infrastructure
  • SM6 – Deformation, faulting, and earthquake processes (including. seismotectonics, geodynamics, earthquake source physics)
  • SM7 – Computational & theoretical seismology
  • SM8 – Crustal fluids & seismic activity (including. induced & triggered seismicity, volcano seismology)
  • SM9 – Real-time seismology & early warning
  • SM10 – Co-organized sessions

Now it’s your turn! Scroll through the programme, be amazed and submit your contribution!


This post has been edited by Kathrin Spieker, Lucia Gualtieri, Laura Ermert and Matthew Agius.

Recent activities of the Seismology Division Early Career Scientists representative(s)

Recent activities of the Seismology Division Early Career Scientists representative(s)

In this blog post we highlight the work that has been done by the Early Career Scientists representatives of the Seismology Division in the last two years.  In recent years the European Geosciences Union has embarked on a mission to reach out for its numerous ‘younger’ members by giving awards to outstanding young scientists and the setting up of Early Career Scientists (ECS) representatives.

The division representative’s role is to engage in discussions that concern students and early career scientists.

A poster about the work done has been presented at this years EGU.

A new team of representatives have been set up during this years General Assembly, but more about the new team will published in an upcoming post.


Seismology Division ECS on social media pages

The Seismology Division (SM) has had its own official ECS representative since 2014. In an effort to reach out to early stage researchers, this blog has been set up in November 2013. Since then over 100 posts have been written featuring subjects such as earthquake lights, L’Aquila earthquake court case, writing scientific articles, publication reviewing process, seismic hum, among many others. Some of the posts are written by guest writers. Over the months the pages proved to be popular, with hundreds of views every week and an increased number of followers.

This page, the SM Division blog, has a regular viewership from around the globe.

Visitors are from across globe.

This page, the SM Division blog, has a regular viewership from around the globe.

Visitors accessing the blog over the last years.

A Facebook page was set up in February 2014, and has since registered over 700 followers. Unlike the blog, Facebook content is more dynamic and rapid, making it an ideal platform to share immediate news, interesting websites, conferences, etc.

Analytics show that the social pages have hundreds of viewers/followers. In some cases the outreach of an
individual post has exceeded 1,000 people. The quality and content of the online pages is getting better
and better, and the audience is expected to soar in the coming months. Seismologists, especially early career ones, are invited to submit their own posts.

The SM Division Facebook page. The page has a constant increase in popularity. More than 670 people like the page. However, some posts have reached an outreach in excess of 1,000 people.

The SM Division Facebook page.

The SM Division Facebook page. The page has a constant increase in popularity. More than 670 people like the page. However, some posts have reached an outreach in excess of 1,000 people.

Some posts have had an outreach in excess of 1,000 people.

The SM Division Facebook page. The page has a constant increase in popularity. More than 670 people like the page. However, some posts have reached an outreach in excess of 1,000 people.

The page has a constant increase in popularity. More than 670 people like the page.

A visibility survey

In order to tailor the content on our social media output, an online survey was carried out with our readers to establish what are the main interests of our followers. Statics show interesting trends. This insight can help us improve the content on these pages.

Survery-ECS

Survery-why_follow

Survery-education

Survery-would

Survery-attend

Impact of the ECS representatives

Apart from the outreach work, the ECS representative role is to engage in discussions that concern students and early career scientists. Several meetings between all the division representatives are held throughout the year to discuss ideas and Union-wide issues. One important impact ECS representatives have had
on EGU is the increased number of short courses and workshops run by ECS during the annual
General Assembly. Another important contribution of ECS representatives was redefining ‘Young
Scientist’ (YS) to ‘Early Career Scientist’, which avoids discrimination due to age. Another milestone is that the head ECS representative now has a non-voting seat on the EGU council. Recently it was ensure that the EGU website is gender neutral, with special attention to the wording of the website. Thanks to these structures the EGU is a bottom-up-organisation, in which its members are represented by their respective scientific divisions, committees and council. 

The full poster is available here:
Agius_et_al_EGU_2016_Recent_activities_of_the_Seismology_Division_Early_Career_Representatives_[Low_Quality]

Seismology social evening at EGU

EGU GA 2016 Seismology social evening

Wondering how to spend your Wednesday night in Wien during the General Assembly?

Wishing to network with your peers, both Early Career Scientists (ECS) and more experiences seismologists, in a informal setting?

Then, come along to the Social Event of the Seismology Division organised by the ECS-representatives team!

See you on Wednesday night, from 8pm, at Bermuda Brau!

Announcement: Seismology Workshop at EGU General Assembly

Title: The Art of Science

Time: Thursday, April 21, 2016; 13:30 – 15:00 

Location: EGU conference center, Room -2.61 or -2.85 (in the basement)

Description: This is a workshop for professionals wishing to perfect the practical skills needed for a successful research career. In the workshop we will choose topics from the following list: choosing a research portfolio; making a workplan; mentoring and being mentored; using the scientific literature; oral and written communication; publishing papers; writing proposals; managing time effectively; and planning a career and applying for jobs in research and industry. This course is aimed at junior researchers and their mentors in all fields of science and engineering.

Roel_Guided3_2015Bio-sketch: Roel Snieder holds the Keck Foundation Endowed Chair of Basic  Exploration Science at the Colorado School of Mines. Roel received in 1984 a Masters degree in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University, and in 1987 a Ph.D. in seismology from Utrecht University. In 1993 he was appointed as professor of seismology at Utrecht University. Roel served  on the editorial boards of Geophysical Journal International, Inverse Problems, Reviews of Geophysics, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and the European Journal of Physics. In 2000 he was elected as Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He is author of the textbooks  “A Guided Tour of Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences”and “The Art of Being a Scientist” that are published by Cambridge University Press.  In 2011 he was elected as Honorary Member of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and in 2014 he received a research award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. From 2000-2014 he was a firefighter in Genesee Fire Rescue where he served for two years as Fire Chief. In 2016, Roel receives the Beno Gutenberg Medal of the European Geosciences Union, for outstanding contributions to seismology.