GM
Geomorphology

Geomorphology

Getting to know the GM presidency candidates: #2 Jens Turowski

During the EGU Election Autumn 2017, all EGU members are asked to give their vote for the next EGU Union President, General Secretary and the Division Presidents until 30 November 2017. The Geomorphology division is in the luxurious situation of having three candidates for division presidency, all of which gathered experience as active members of the EGU GM division structure.

In order to get to know the candidates a little better, the early career representatives of the GM division (Annegret Larsen and Micha Dietze) have asked the candidates a few questions from a ECS perspective. Below, we post the answers given by candidate #2, Jens Turowski.

Candidate #2

Name: Jens Martin Turowski

Webpage: http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/section/geomorphology/staff/profil/jens-turowski/

Twitter: @JMTurowski

ECS: What is your field of research (three points maximum)

Jens Turowski: I strive to develop and improve conceptual and mathematical models of physical processes acting at the Earth’s surface using high-quality field data. My previous research has focused on mountain channels (bedload transport, fluvial bedrock erosion, channel morphology, role of organic matter), but I have been / I am also working on debris flows, rockfall-dominated landscapes and rocky coastlines. One of my special interest is the development and improvement of field techniques.

Why do you want to run for president?

One of the great things about geomorphology is that it is highly interdisciplinary. The division president has the privilege to directly liaise with the many divisions that thematically overlap with GM. I hope that I can build stronger ties to other disciplines that benefit both the geomorphology community and other disciplines.

What is the first thing you will change once elected president?

I believe that many of the services that the GM division currently offers run quite well and do not need major changes. I would like to improve the division web site to make it a better (-used) resource for the community and there are aspects of the OSPP competition that I am not happy about. Big challenges for the division lie in the connections to other scientific organizations that also represent geomorphology and with other divisions within EGU.

What is your view on the role of early career scientists within the EGU GM division?

Scientific organizations like the EGU often provide the first opportunities for young scientist to obtain leadership experience. Organizing sessions for the EGU General Assembly was my first step to getting involved in community service and into building a professional network beyond my immediate collaborators. I believe that both the GM division will profit from the involvement of young scientists and vice versa. I hope that I can include many young scientists in the GM program committee over the next few years.

I also see the EGU, and in particular the GM division, as a means to provide support to young scientists, for example by providing training opportunities. The EGU supports young scientist’s workshops and training schools that have benefitted me and hopefully many others. The OSPP poster competition is a valuable tool to highlight excellent research and help talented young scientists at the start of their career.

Last but not least: a network of peers in a similar situation, both professionally and personally, can help through difficult situations during a doctorate or post-doctoral studies and can open opportunities for research.

How will you safeguard diversity and inclusiveness within the EGU GM division?

Diversity and inclusiveness become more and more important, both within science and outside. I believe the GM division or the EGU as a whole can take action in two main areas: 1) providing a secure environment for research and communication, and 2) highlighting role models. I can think of several actions for point 1). For example, I would like to explore a kind of secure app with the EGU – if someone is in a threatening situation or faces harassment, let’s say during a poster discussion, support can be called via an app and a dedicated person comes along to help to diffuse the situation. Concerning role models, in the past we have for example strived to solicit female speakers in the ‘Meet the Master’ workshop. These efforts should be intensified.

Getting to know the GM presidency candidates: #1 Dan Parsons

During the EGU Election Autumn 2017, all EGU members are asked to give their vote for the next EGU Union President, General Secretary and the Division Presidents until 30 November 2017. The Geomorphology division is in the luxurious situation of having three candidates for division presidency, all of which gathered experience as active members of the EGU GM division structure.

In order to get to know the candidates a little better, the early career representatives of the GM division (Annegret Larsen and Micha Dietze) have asked the candidates a few questions from a ECS perspective. Below, we post the answers given by candidate #1, Dan Parsons.

Candidate #1

Name: Dan Parsons

Webpage: http://www.hull.ac.uk/Faculties/staff-profiles/Professor-Daniel-Parsons.aspx

Twitter: @bedform

ECS: What is your field of research (three poitns maximum)

Dan Parsons: Geomorphology, Sediment transport, Morphodynamics

Why do you want to run for president?

I am thoroughly enjoying my time as a Division Science Officer within EGU and helping to set the objectives and direction of the GM and SSP divisions, and contributing to the shape of the EGU General Assembly each April over the past few years. I have also enjoyed being part of the ESurf team of associate editors – seeing the journal grow and evolve within the community has been very rewarding.

GM interfaces and interacts with almost all Divisions within EGU, with a high number of co-organized sessions across the general meeting being a visible outcome – this creates challenges but also significant opportunities. Sustaining the volume, breadth and quality of contributions to the GA within GM, taking advantage of other opportunities to bring people together in smaller meetings with leveraged EGU support (e.g. Galileo Meetings) – and thus confirming EGU in a position at the forefront of geomorphological science globally, is what I would like to ensure over the coming years as Division President. However, we need to also safeguard that the General Assembly does not become too bland and that smaller cutting-edge interdisciplinary areas are not lost in a growing meeting – retaining this distinctness is key and something I am passionate about.

Overall, I have benefited enormously from the networking opportunities EGU has created for me early in my career and I would like to serve, you the community, and give something back to the through my energy and leadership experience in the role of Division President.

What is the first thing you will change once elected president?

The Presidency of the GM division is an exciting challenge and is a position I would be honoured to serve. My aims in role would be to ensure that we continue to now evolve a new and open strategy around maintaining GM distinctiveness within broader EGU interactions, safeguarding a focus on serving Early Career Researchers and retain and build on an open and transparent leadership of the community.

In essence I feel that we need a strategy on what we want the GM division to look like in 5 years from now as EGU continues to evolve – and as such we need to decide as a community what actions we need to shape this strategy and direction.

This is something I would look to build and develop community consensus around in the role as President-elect so that we have a clearer decision base and response pathway. Additionally, and as part of developing this strategy I think there is a need to enhance our communications across the division. This has been much improved over the past few years, but we can do more. As such I would look to instil a more regular communication bulletin across GM and look to utilise a range of platforms, such as the use of notifications and social media, in delivering this enhanced communication.

What is your view on the role of early career scientists within the EGU GM division?

ECR’s are the engine of the division and EGU more generally. The General Assembly is, in my mind, to a large degree, an ECR meeting. As such the strategic direction of the General Assembly, the Division and the EGU more generally needs to be driven by the needs and desires of the ECR community. I am proud of the number of sessions organised and led by ECR’s within GM at the EGU GA – this is something I have championed in my Science Officer role over the past few years. The networking and profile building opportunities that the EGU GA offers is a valuable outcome of EGU as a whole. Embedding ECR’s and fora into the evolution of an enhanced GM strategy and decision base will be a key outcome should I be elected. We have made good advances in facilitating the building of an active, diverse and welcoming ECR community – one that we are rightly proud of as a broader community. We need to cherish and build on this to ensure that we have an environment that serves the ECR community and the symbiotic relationship between the ECR community and EGU as a whole thrives.

How will you safeguard diversity and inclusiveness within the EGU GM division?

Although great strides have been made, I think there needs to be enhanced openness around the issues of diversity and inclusivity at EGU and within the GM Division. Progress is best achieved through improved visibility of our gender and other diversity imbalances – and exposing such biases and discussing them openly is critical to making headway on such issues. This includes open discussion and enhanced communication, around the membership, of committees and award nomination statistics and the way in which we organise calls for positions and nominations, such that an improved balance, more in keeping with our membership’s diversity, can be achieved. This cannot be achieved overnight but the development of the enhanced strategy discussed above, which has these issues forefront within and embedded into the vision, are major steps to achieving parity across the division and EGU more generally.

Time to travel – the ERASMUS program turns 30 this year

Time to travel – the ERASMUS program turns 30 this year

The mobility program of the European Union, named after Erasmus of Rotterdam who studied in different places all over Europe, turns 30 this year. I wanted to take this opportunity to promote this great possibility for gathering international experience and getting insights into the teaching and research skills of our European colleagues.

During the Erasmus UAV course on the outskirts of Vienna, July 2017 (credit: Bloethe & Kraushaar)

The ERASMUS program, named ERASMUS+ since 2014, is most famous for providing scholarships for students, and that is what this backronym originally stands for: European region action scheme for the mobility of university students (ERASMUS). But over the years, the program has been growing, since 1997 also funding the mobility of University staff between institutions. Since then, roughly half a million staff exchanges were funded. Every European University that takes part in the ERASMUS program has bilateral agreements for the mutual exchange of students and staff. And the big advantage of the ERASMUS staff exchange program is that it is very easy to organize: Find out which institution your university has an agreement with, contact a colleague there, sign a mobility agreement and plan your trip. The financial support is really well calculated: Depending on which country you are visiting you will receive a dayly lump sum of 100-160 Euro for living expenses and of course travel costs depending on distance (e.g. 500-2000km = 275 Euro).

Our department at Bonn University for example has 34 partner institutions all over Europe, and with ERASMUS+ there is also the possibility to expand these collaborations to non-EU countries worldwide. This year, we received Tomas Galia from the University of Ostrava (Czech Republic) here in Bonn to share his research findings on woody debris in mountain channels in the Carpathian Mountains and I went to the University of Vienna (Austria) to give a field course on UAV applications in geomorphology together with Sabine Kraushaar. So, take advantage of this opportunity and get to know other departments and offer joint courses with your colleagues and maybe also advance other projects during that shared time.

Check out the possibilities at: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/opportunities/staff-teaching_en

 

Stormy Geomorphology

Stormy Geomorphology

 – written by James Tempest (University of Cambridge), Larissa A. Naylor (University of Glasgow), Tom Spencer and Iris Möller (University of Cambridge) –

Extreme storm and flood events are occurring with increasing frequency and intensity across the globe causing significant geomorphic change throughout many landscapes often with detrimental impacts on local populations.

Boat washed onto shore following major storm surge in N. Norfolk, U.K. (credits: James Tempest)

In 2014 an international meeting hosted by the Royal Geographical Society and British Society for Geomorphology brought together world-leading experts in this field to showcase the fundamental role geomorphology plays in the age of extremes. The outcomes of the meeting were published in a special issue of Earth Surface Processes and Landforms which included a State of Science paper on this topic (see below). These papers highlighted how geomorphic contributions can enhance our ability to predict, measure and manage the landscape to be more resilient to effects of extreme events.

Predicting extreme hydrological events are an important area of research but such forecasts are often limited by the short length of current river flow records which only extend to the mid 20th Century. Palaeogeomorphology studies resolve such issues by reconstructing historical flood events thereby extending the flood record further back in time to capture these extreme events. Such records not only improve the forecasting of extreme events by providing models with much needed additional data but also allow us to interpret the interactions between geomorphic dynamics, human impacts and changes in climate regimes.

Extreme events witnessed over recent years have raised awareness of policy-makers and practitioners about the important role that geomorphology can play in both managing the landscape and human impacts to these extreme events. Geomorphic processes can both mediate and increase the geomorphological impacts of extreme events, influencing societal risk. This includes determining the resilience and recovery of landscapes, such as barrier islands, to extreme events that may offer some form of natural flood defence. In addition, geomorphological science is now regularly used to deliver nature-based management approaches, such as the creation of coastal wetlands. Such approaches are delivering more sustainable forms of flood and storm defence that are effective in reducing damage and destruction brought about by extreme events.

Sea-defence repair and re-distribution of sediments at Chesil Beach, U.K. following 2014 storms (credits: James Tempest)

Geomorphological science is undoubtedly improving our understanding of flood risk through extreme events yet it is still under-appreciated and under-utilised by the engineering community and policy-makers. Future climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction strategies must consider geomorphology as an important component in determining and managing the response of landscapes in order to protect human assets in an age of extreme flood and storm events.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/esp.4065/abstract

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/esp.4062/abstract

 

 – written by James Tempest (University of Cambridge), Larissa A. Naylor (University of Glasgow), Tom Spencer and Iris Möller (University of Cambridge) –