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Join us at the EGU 2019 General Assembly: Call for abstracts is now open!

Join us at the EGU 2019 General Assembly: Call for abstracts is now open!

From now, up until 10 January 2019, you can submit your abstract for the upcoming EGU General Assembly (EGU 2019).

In addition to established scientists, PhD students and other early career researchers are welcome to submit abstracts to present their research at the conference. Further, the EGU encourages undergraduate and master students to submit abstracts on their dissertations or final-year projects.

The EGU recognises that there are many outstanding students who would benefit from attending and presenting at the General Assembly and, therefore, provides a discounted registration rate to this group. Interested undergraduates can apply to present a poster, talk or PICO presentation on research undertaken in a laboratory setting, on a mapping or field project they’ve been involved in during their degrees, or any other research project of relevance.

Browse through the EGU 2019 sessions. Clicking on ‘Please select’ will allow you to search for sessions by programme groups and submit your abstract to the relevant session either as plain text, LaTeX, or a MS Word document. Further guidelines on how to submit an abstract are available on the EGU 2019 website.

An innovative presentation format – Presenting Interactive Content, better known as PICO – has been implemented at the General Assembly since 2013. PICO sessions bring together the advantages of both oral and poster sessions, allowing authors to present the essence of their work and follow it up with interactive discussion. Please note that some sessions are ‘PICO only’ sessions, meaning you cannot select oral/poster preference. If you are submitting to a PICO only session be sure to check out our PICO guide, for tips on how to prepare your presentation.

The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is 10 January 2019, 13:00 CET. If you would like to apply for financial support, called the Roland Schlich travel support, to attend the 2019 General Assembly, please submit an application no later than 1 December 2018. We’ll be providing further information about how to apply for travel grants and how they are awarded in a forthcoming post.

EGU 2019 will take place from 7 to 12 April 2019 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2019 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU19 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

NB: We strongly recommend booking accommodation for the 2019 General Assembly as soon as possible. The Vienna City Marathon (40,000 participants) will take place on Sunday, resulting in many hotels being fully booked the night before.

Giving back to the city: First EGU Public Lecture at the General Assembly 2018 in Vienna

Giving back to the city: First EGU Public Lecture at the General Assembly 2018 in Vienna

The inaugural EGU Public Lecture, titled ‘After Paris: Are we getting the climate crisis under control?’, took place last April at the 2018 General Assembly in the Natural History Museum of Vienna.

In this first public lecture, Stefan Rahmstorf, a climate scientist at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, took the audience on a fascinating journey through the climate system, discussed its impact around the world, and addressed whether the Paris Agreement will mitigate the risks of Earth’s changing climate. Claudia Volosciuk from the World Meteorological Organization reports on the lecture.

Our pale blue dot

Rahmstorf started by taking a look at the small and fragile planet Earth from space, explaining the ways in which Earth receives and radiates energy, including an animation showing the history of greenhouse gas emissions.

He then went into more detail, showing for example the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and how its increase in the atmosphere is human-caused. The lecture covered multiple geoscientific disciplines and highlighted their connections to each other: from coral reefs to the cryosphere, the oceans to the atmosphere, and hurricanes to deserts.

Studying Earth’s climate

Stefan Rahmstorf explaining the ways in which Earth receives and radiates energy, and the impacts of the additional carbon dioxide that is emitted to the atmosphere. Credit: Hischam Momen / Natural History Museum of Vienna

The audience also gained insight into the various methods that geoscientists use to study different aspects and time scales of the Earth system.

For example, scientists estimate potential future climate outcomes, by employing climate models to analyse the Earth system’s response to different greenhouse gases emission rates, also known as climate scenarios.

To reconstruct Earth’s past climate, researchers have used natural archives (like ice cores or tree rings), and written records. These observations and reconstructions reveal that the hottest summer in Europe since 1500 took place in 2010, followed by 2003, 2002, 2006 and 2007. “I believe that you don’t need to ask a statistician if you want to know whether this is just chance, it’s clear that this is a systematic effect,”* emphasised Rahmstorf.

The Paris Agreement

Referring to the presentation’s title, Rahmstorf highlighted the great success of ratifying the Paris climate accord to limit global temperature rise to well below two degrees above pre-industrial levels, but he  argued that it came 20 years too late. If the agreement had been reached earlier, there would have been more time for countries to curb carbon emission rates and transition to a carbon-free economy, explained Rahmstorf.

He also cautioned that the agreement isn’t a perfect solution as it still implies a substantial warming. For instance, if we met the Paris agreement’s global temperature rise goal, Rahmstorf noted that the average temperature over land would be higher than the global average, as the oceans do not warm as strongly as land masses. Reaching the Paris agreement goals would still create conditions beyond what Earth has experienced for hundreds of thousands of years.

Rahmstorf suggested mechanisms that policy makers could adopt to increase the speed of emission reduction, which is not yet sufficient to reach the Paris agreement goals. These include establishing a minimum price to emit carbon dioxide and ending subsidies for fossil fuels, which are currently still higher than renewable energy subsidies.

He also warned that the longer we wait to decarbonise our economy, the faster we will have to reduce our emission levels in the future. “The famous climate scenarios are called scenarios and not forecasts,” Rahmstorf explained, “Humankind has the choice whether it wants to emit a lot or a little CO2.”*

EGU and Vienna

The General Assembly has been held in Vienna for more than a decade and the EGU has a very good relationship with the city, according to EGU President Jonathan Bamber. “We thought it is about time that we try an experiment and give something back to the city,” said Bamber, “to share with you our enthusiasm and excitement about the science we do.”

Stefan Rahmstorf (left), Jonathan Bamber (center), and Christian Koeberl (right) at the 2018 EGU Public Lecture. Credit: Hischam Momen / Natural History Museum of Vienna

The director general of the Natural History Museum of Vienna, Christian Koeberl, highly appreciated the Union’s decision to conduct the public lecture at the museum, as the institution has a variety of geoscientific activities, including preserving collections and carrying out research projects.

“Today’s topic is one that interests and affects us all, namely climate. Climate is obviously something that is strongly connected with our understanding of the Earth, but also with our interaction as humans with the Earth,”* Koeberl remarked. The event was at full capacity, attended by an audience spanning all age groups, suggesting that Koeberl’s sentiment was widely shared.

By Claudia Volosciuk, World Meteorological Organization

*Quotation is a translation from the German original

General Assembly 2018 – Highlights

General Assembly 2018 – Highlights

It’s been about two weeks since the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna. The conference this year was a great success with 4,776 oral, 11,128 poster, and 1,419 PICO presentations. There were 666 unique scientific sessions, complimented by 68 short courses and 294 side events, making for an interesting and diverse programme.

The conference brought together 15,075 scientists from 106 countries, 53% of which were under the age of 35 years. Keeping abreast of everything that was going on throughout the week was made easier due to the distribution of 15,000 copies of EGU Today, and a keen media presence reporting on scientific sessions. Thousands of visits to the webstreams, as well as GeoLog, meant those at the conference and those who couldn’t make it could stayed tuned to the best of the conference! We thank all of you very much for your attendance and active contribution to the conference.

Help us make the General Assembly next year (7–12 April 2019, Vienna, Austria) even better by filling out the feedback questionnaire. It only takes a few minutes, but hurry, it closes on Sunday June 3rd!

To reminisce about a productive week, why not watch this video of the best bits of the conference?

This year, the General Assembly was for the first time documented by EGU’s very own artists in residence. Sam Illingworth, Science Communication Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (UK), and Matthew Partridge, Senior Research Fellow at Southampton University (UK), produced engaging poems and cartoons to share their conference experiences and communicate science. Why not reflect on the General Assembly through a more artistic lens? You can find all their work on EGU’s GeoLog.

Coffee Haiku by Matthew Partridge and Sam Illingworth

What’s on in Vienna this weekend

What’s on in Vienna this weekend

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few hours left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Relax with Vienna’s best coffee

You can’t visit Vienna without going for a coffee and a slice of Sacher torte in one of the city’s fine coffee establishments. Try Cafe Hawelka, once a hub of Viennese artists, or Cafe Central, the legendary literati cafe.

Explore architectural wonders

Immerse yourself in Vienna’s architectural heritage with a visit to Wien Museum Karlzplatz, where you will find an exhibition of Otto Wagner’s architectural works. Follow the exhibition with a walking tour of the city to see these wonders for yourself.

Wien Museum Karlsplatz (Credit: Kbsen, Wikimedia Commons)

Get into the jungle

Step outside of the city and explore the Lobau, a national park fondly known as ‘Vienna’s jungle’. Catch a boat straight from the old city and travel in style.

Gardens, palaces and plants fairs

Enjoy the Viennese spring sunshine in the botanical gardens this weekend and while you’re there drop in on Raritätenbörse, Vienna’s exotic plant fair in the Botanical Garden of the University of Vienna. For anyone looking for a botanical souvenir of EGU, there promises to be a big range of exotic plants on sale.  For the less green-fingered, why not head to the Belvedere Palace next door and explore some of the spectacular art on display.

Design markets in the Museum Quartier

For anyone interested in design, there is an international design market (WAMP) outside the Museum Quartier on Saturday. It promises to showcase the best of local and eastern European design, accompanied by tasty street food and a lively atmosphere.

Superfly birthday night

For anyone wanting to party, Superfly radio (a Viennese radio station) is holding a 8-floor extravaganza at the Ottakringer Brauerei to celebrate its 10 year birthday, boasting international acts and all-night music. Hip Hop, Disco, Soul, Electronic beats and breaks, House and Latin music are just some of the genres on offer for those who fancy letting their hair down on Friday evening.

Strauss and Mozart Concert at the Kursalon

In the home country of Strauss and Mozart, any fans of classical music should head to the Kursalon concert hall for the traditional Viennese experience. There are concerts every evening this weekend. For those who want to treat themselves, why not book a ‘Concert and Dinner ticket’ and enjoy a gala dinner before the show in the Kursalon’s Restaurant Johann.

Schönbrunn Palace

If rooms of Baroque glory are your thing, then Schönbrunn Palace is the place to go. At the end of the seventeenth century Emperor Leopold I commissioned the architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, who had received his training in Rome, to design an imperial hunting lodge for his son, Crown Prince Joseph, later to become Emperor Joseph I. The park at Schönbrunn Palace, complete with maze, vineyard and orangery, extends for 1.2 km from east to west and approximately one kilometre from north to south. Together with the palace, it was placed on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1996.