GeoLog

photography

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Competition 2018!

The selection committee received over 600 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants at the 2018 General Assembly have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  of the conference and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to 2018’s fantastic photographers!

 

Foehn clouds in Patagonia,’ by Christoph Mayr (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A stationary cloud formed on the lee side of Mount Fitzroy. It evolved from a lenticular cloud (Altocumulus lenticularis) and turned into a funnel-shaped cloud during sunset when the photo was taken.

 

Jebel Bayda (White Mountain),’ by Luigi Vigliotti (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). An aerial view of the Jebel Bayda, a white volcano created by silica-rich lava (comendite) in the Khaybar region. The flank of the volcano was shaped by rain in the region during the first half of the Holocene.

 

Remains of a former ocean floor,’ by Jana Eichel (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). These limestone boulders characterise the landscape of Castle Hill Basin in New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The Pacific Plate collided with the Australian Plate during the Kaikoura Orogeny 25 million years ago, giving birth not only to the Southern Alps but also lifting up thick limestone beds formed in shallow ocean water.

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Photo Competition finalists 2018 – who will you vote for?

The selection committee received over 600 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Competition, covering fields across the geosciences. The fantastic finalist photos are below and they are being exhibited in Hall X2 (basement, Brown Level) of the Austria Center Vienna – see for yourself!

Do you have a favourite? Vote for it! There is a voting terminal (also in Hall X2), just next to the exhibit. The results will be announced on Friday 13 April during the lunch break (at 12:15).

Remains of a former ocean floor.’ Credit: Jana Eichel (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). These limestone boulders characterise the landscape of Castle Hill Basin in New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The Pacific Plate collided with the Australian Plate during the Kaikoura Orogeny 25 million years ago, giving birth not only to the Southern Alps but also lifting up thick limestone beds formed in shallow ocean water.

 

Foehn clouds in Patagonia.’ Credit: Christoph Mayr (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A stationary cloud formed on the lee side of Mount Fitzroy. It evolved from a lenticular cloud (Altocumulus lenticularis) and turned into a funnel-shaped cloud during sunset when the photo was taken.

 

Jebel Bayda (White Mountain).’ Credit: Luigi Vigliotti (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). An aerial view of the Jebel Bayda, a white volcano created by silica-rich lava (comendite) in the Khaybar region. The flank of the volcano was shaped by rain in the region during the first half of the Holocene.

 

Mother-of-pearl cloud.’ Credit: Thomas Kuhn (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). These clouds are a special type of polar stratospheric clouds that only occur during the polar winter. The tiny ice crystals that form in these clouds must be uniform in size so that diffraction can create their shining colours.

 

Patagonian rainforest.’ Credit: Carsten W. Mueller (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The magic light in the Patagonian rain forest is dominated by Southern beech (Nothofagus). The high precipitation in Southern Patagonia sustains biodiverse rainforests on peaty soils.

 

The beauty of shells.’ Credit: Rene Hoffmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A thin section of a belemnite (Gonioteuthis, Upper Cretaceous, NW-Germany) under crossed polarizers. Belemnites are the backbone of Jurassic-Cretaceous reconstruction as they able to determine former seawater properties, such as temperature.

 

50 shades of grey.’ Credit: Paolo Paron (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The dry sandy river bed of the Limpopo River. This picture was taken at the end of January, in the middle of the rainy season, and shows the devastating effects of the prolonged drought. The surrounding floodplain that is used extensively by farmers would normally be inundated.

 

Pinnacles in Nambug National Park at sunset.’ Credit: Stefan Doerr (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The spectacular pinnacle karst in Western Australia. This landscape contains thousands of pinnacles up to 5 m high and 2 m wide. The pinnacles have formed in the Pleistocene Tamala Limestone, which comprises cyclic sequences of aeolian calcarenite, calcrete / microbialite and palaeosol.

 

Closer look at the deglaciation history of Lago Belgrano.’ Credit: Monika Mendelova (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). The Lago Belgrano valley was once occupied by a glacier, which drained part of the Patagonian Ice Sheet. The retreating glacier allowed a large palaeo-lake to form, a predecessor of modern Lago Belgrano. Spot the shoreline!

 

Poetry of water shaped formations.’ Credit: Raphael Knevels (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). This karst cave was discovered in 2005 and named Paradise Cave because of its exceptionally beautiful stalactites and stalagmites. The cave is located in the Phong Nha-Kẻ Bàng National Park, Vietnam.

 

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 8 to 13 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website and follow the Assembly’s online conversation on Twitter at #EGU18.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Tasman Lake Down Under 

Imaggeo on Mondays: Tasman Lake Down Under 

The Tasman Glacier Terminal Lake, seen in this photograph, lies in the Aoraki Mount Cook National Park in New Zealand’s south island. The photographer, Martina Ulvrova, stated she “finally got to see the largest glacier in New Zealand after several days of heavy rain, during which the landscape was bathing in mist”.

The Tasman Glacier is 23 km long and is surrounded by a terminal proglacial lake with floating icebergs. The lake was only formed in the 1970s by the melting of the Tasman Glacier. Today the lake is 7 km long and growing faster than ever with its length that is increasing by approximately 180 m per year on average!

This continual lake growth is largely due to the receding glacier which has been retreating since the 1970s and has shrunk by approximately 6 km over the past fifty years. Blocks of ice regularly break-off the flowing glacier and float peacefully on the lake. One can see only the tips of these enormous icebergs with about 90% of the iceberg mass hidden below the surface of the water.

In 2011, after a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, 40 million tonne chunk of ice broke away from the Tasman glacier and plunged into the lake. The collapse of the gigantic block caused a local tsunami with waves as high as three meters bouncing from side to side across the lake for thirty minutes. Scientists expect the Tasman glacier to continue shrinking considerably and warn that it is likely to eventually disappear. Global warming has hit this secret paradise and predictions are alarming.

By Martina Ulvrova

If you pre-register for the 2018 General Assembly (Vienna, 08–13 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 15 January until 15 February, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submittheir photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

EGU Photo Contest 2018: Now open for submissions!

EGU Photo Contest 2018: Now open for submissions!

If you are pre-registered for the 2018 General Assembly (Vienna, 8 – 13 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly!

The ninth annual EGU photo competition opens on 15 January. Up until 15 February, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences.

Shortlisted photos will be exhibited at the conference, together with the winning moving image, which will be selected by a panel of judges. General Assembly participants can vote for their favourite photos and the winning images will be announced on the last day of the meeting.

If you submit your images to the photo competition, they will also be included in the EGU’s open access photo database, Imaggeo. You retain full rights of use for any photos submitted to the database as they are licensed and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons license.

You will need to register on Imaggeo so that the organisers can appropriately process your photos. For more information, please check the EGU Photo Contest page on Imaggeo.

Previous winning photographs can be seen on the 20102011, 2012,  2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 winners’ pages.

In the meantime, get shooting!

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.